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Volume 11(3); September 2018
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Review Articles
The Relationship between Saccades and Locomotion
Anshul Srivastava, Omar F. Ahmad, Christopher Pham Pacia, Mark Hallett, Codrin Lungu
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):93-106.   Published online August 9, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18018
  • 11,697 View
  • 433 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Human locomotion involves a complex interplay among multiple brain regions and depends on constant feedback from the visual system. We summarize here the current understanding of the relationship among fixations, saccades, and gait as observed in studies sampling eye movements during locomotion, through a review of the literature and a synthesis of the relevant knowledge on the topic. A significant overlap in locomotor and saccadic neural circuitry exists that may support this relationship. Several animal studies have identified potential integration nodes between these overlapping circuitries. Behavioral studies that explored the relationship of saccadic and gait-related impairments in normal conditions and in various disease states are also discussed. Eye movements and locomotion share many underlying neural circuits, and further studies can leverage this interplay for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • What Happens in Your Brain When You Walk Down the Street? Implications of Architectural Proportions, Biophilia, and Fractal Geometry for Urban Science
    Aenne A. Brielmann, Nir H. Buras, Nikos A. Salingaros, Richard P. Taylor
    Urban Science.2022; 6(1): 3.     CrossRef
  • Decreased Saccadic Eye Movement Speed Correlates with Dynamic Balance in Older Adults
    Youngsook Bae
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(13): 7842.     CrossRef
  • Effects of different virtual reality technology driven dual-tasking paradigms on posture and saccadic eye movements in healthy older adults
    Yu Imaoka, Andri Flury, Laura Hauri, Eling D. de Bruin
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of eye movement exercise and diaphragmatic breathing with jogging in reducing migraine symptoms: A preliminary, randomized comparison trial
    Mohammad Dawood Rahimi, Pouriya Hassani, Mohammad Taghi Kheirkhah, Javad Salehi Fadardi
    Brain and Behavior.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Deep brain stimulation and eye movements
    Maja Klarendic, Diego Kaski
    European Journal of Neuroscience.2021; 53(7): 2344.     CrossRef
  • Antisaccade, a predictive marker for freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease and gait/gaze network connectivity
    Cécile Gallea, Benoit Wicki, Claire Ewenczyk, Sophie Rivaud-Péchoux, Lydia Yahia-Cherif, Pierre Pouget, Marie Vidailhet, Elodie Hainque
    Brain.2021; 144(2): 504.     CrossRef
  • Response Inhibition Deficits in Women with the FMR1 Premutation are Associated with Age and Fall Risk
    Carly Moser, Lyndsay Schmitt, Joseph Schmidt, Amanda Fairchild, Jessica Klusek
    Brain and Cognition.2021; 148: 105675.     CrossRef
  • Concomitant improvement in anti-saccade success rate and postural instability gait difficulty after rTMS treatment for Parkinson’s disease
    Ken-ichi Okada, Mizuki Takahira, Tomoo Mano, Taichi Uga, Kuni Konaka, Koichi Hosomi, Youichi Saitoh
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multitasking Compensatory Saccadic Training Program for Hemianopia Patients: A New Approach With 3-Dimensional Real-World Objects
    Laura Mena-Garcia, Jose C. Pastor-Jimeno, Miguel J. Maldonado, Maria B. Coco-Martin, Itziar Fernandez, Juan F. Arenillas
    Translational Vision Science & Technology.2021; 10(2): 3.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Binocular Vision in Avoiding Virtual Obstacles While Walking
    Jingbo Zhao, Robert S. Allison
    IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics.2021; 27(7): 3277.     CrossRef
  • Saccade and Fixation Eye Movements During Walking in People With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
    Ellen Lirani-Silva, Samuel Stuart, Lucy Parrington, Kody Campbell, Laurie King
    Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Clinical and Imaging Features of Multiple System Atrophy: Challenges for an Early and Clinically Definitive Diagnosis
Hirohisa Watanabe, Yuichi Riku, Kazuhiro Hara, Kazuya Kawabata, Tomohiko Nakamura, Mizuki Ito, Masaaki Hirayama, Mari Yoshida, Masahisa Katsuno, Gen Sobue
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):107-120.   Published online August 9, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18020
  • 14,022 View
  • 1,056 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is an adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Patients with MSA show various phenotypes during the course of their illness, including parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic failure, and pyramidal signs. Patients with MSA sometimes present with isolated autonomic failure or motor symptoms/ signs. The median duration from onset to the concomitant appearance of motor and autonomic symptoms is approximately 2 years but can range up to 14 years. As the presence of both motor and autonomic symptoms is essential for the current diagnostic criteria, early diagnosis is difficult when patients present with isolated autonomic failure or motor symptoms/signs. In contrast, patients with MSA may show severe autonomic failure and die before the presentation of motor symptoms/signs, which are currently required for the diagnosis of MSA. Recent studies have also revealed that patients with MSA may show nonsupporting features of MSA such as dementia, hallucinations, and vertical gaze palsy. To establish early diagnostic criteria and clinically definitive categorization for the successful development of disease-modifying therapy or symptomatic interventions for MSA, research should focus on the isolated phase and atypical symptoms to develop specific clinical, imaging, and fluid biomarkers that satisfy the requirements for objectivity, for semi- or quantitative measurements, and for uncomplicated, worldwide availability. Several novel techniques, such as automated compartmentalization of the brain into multiple parcels for the quantification of gray and white matter volumes on an individual basis and the visualization of α-synuclein and other candidate serum and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, may be promising for the early and clinically definitive diagnosis of MSA.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Neurodegenerative disorders affecting the autonomic nervous system: Pure autonomic failure and multiple system atrophy
    Yoshitaka Yamanaka, Nobuyuki Araki, Satoshi Kuwabara
    Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience.2022; 10(3): 115.     CrossRef
  • Glia Imaging Differentiates Multiple System Atrophy from Parkinson's Disease: A Positron Emission Tomography Study with [ 11 C ] PBR28 and Machine Learn
    Aurelija Jucaite, Zsolt Cselényi, William C. Kreisl, Eugenii A. Rabiner, Andrea Varrone, Richard E. Carson, Juha O. Rinne, Alicia Savage, Magnus Schou, Peter Johnström, Per Svenningsson, Olivier Rascol, Wassilios G. Meissner, Paolo Barone, Klaus Seppi, Ho
    Movement Disorders.2022; 37(1): 119.     CrossRef
  • Data-driven subtype classification of patients with early-stage multiple system atrophy
    Hui-Jun Yang, Han-Joon Kim, Yu Jin Jung, Dallah Yoo, Ji-Hyun Choi, Jin Hee Im, Beomseok Jeon
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 95: 92.     CrossRef
  • Clinicopathological correlates of pyramidal signs in multiple system atrophy
    Chi‐Ying R. Lin, Anisha Viswanathan, Tiffany X. Chen, Hiroshi Mitsumoto, Jean P. Vonsattel, Phyllis L. Faust, Sheng‐Han Kuo
    Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology.2022; 9(7): 988.     CrossRef
  • The “Black Straight-Line Sign” in the Putamen in Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: A Potential Diagnostic MRI Marker for Multiple System Atrophy
    Yiming Zheng, Xiwen Wang, Huajian Zhao, Yanyan Jiang, Ying Zhu, Jing Chen, Wei Sun, Zhaoxia Wang, Yunchuang Sun
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical Aspects of the Differential Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease and Parkinsonism
    Hae-Won Shin, Sang-Wook Hong, Young Chul Youn
    Journal of Clinical Neurology.2022; 18(3): 259.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Features and Neuroimaging Findings of Neuropil Antibody–Positive Idiopathic Sporadic Ataxia of Unknown Etiology
    Akira Takekoshi, Akio Kimura, Nobuaki Yoshikura, Isamu Yamakawa, Makoto Urushitani, Katsuya Nakamura, Kunihiro Yoshida, Takayoshi Shimohata
    The Cerebellum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the quality of life in patients with multiple system atrophy
    Hee Jin Chang, Han-Joon Kim, Kyung Ah Woo, Jung Hwan Shin, Ki-Young Jung
    Sleep and Breathing.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Management of balance problems in an elderly with multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C) and sick sinus syndrome
    Amber Eker, Pembe Hare Yıgıtoglu, Hamza Duygu, Ersin Tan
    Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2021; 69(3): 208.     CrossRef
  • Immunotherapies in Huntington's disease and α-Synucleinopathies
    Oluwaseun Fatoba, Yosuke Ohtake, Takahide Itokazu, Toshihide Yamashita
    Frontiers in Immunology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Dysfunctional Autonomic Function and “Dysfunctional” Fatigue in Drug Naïve Parkinson’s Disease
    Jong Hyeon Ahn, Minkyeong Kim, Jun Kyu Mun, Yoonsu Cho, Ji Sun Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Joong-Seok Kim, Jin Whan Cho
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2020; 10(2): 605.     CrossRef
  • Early autonomic and cognitive dysfunction in PD, DLB and MSA: blurring the boundaries between α-synucleinopathies
    Giovanni Palermo, Eleonora Del Prete, Ubaldo Bonuccelli, Roberto Ceravolo
    Journal of Neurology.2020; 267(12): 3444.     CrossRef
  • Changes of Amide Proton Transfer Imaging in Multiple System Atrophy Parkinsonism Type
    Shuhua Li, Piu Chan, Chunmei Li, Haibo Chen, Min Chen, Wen Su, Kai Li, Na Lu, Lu Yu, Defa Chu, Pu-Yeh Wu
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Frontline of Non-genetic Cerebellar Ataxia
    Nobuaki Yoshikura, Akio Kimura, Takayoshi Shimohata
    Nihon Naika Gakkai Zasshi.2020; 109(6): 1138.     CrossRef
  • Purva Rupeeyam of bhela indriya sthana-an explorative study
    Kshama Gupta, Prasad Mamidi
    International Journal of Complementary & Alternative Medicine.2020; 13(6): 228.     CrossRef
  • A case of multiple system atrophy
    Jing Guo, Fuying Liu, Tingting Liu, Xin Zhang, Yong Luo
    Journal of International Medical Research.2019; 47(11): 5839.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Individual Therapeutic Singing Program for Vocal Quality and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease
Eun Young Han, Ji Young Yun, Hyun Ju Chong, Kyoung-Gyu Choi
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):121-128.   Published online August 9, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17078
  • 10,078 View
  • 254 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) frequently experience depression associated with voice problems. Singing involves the use of similar muscles and the neural networks associated with vocal function and emotional response. The purpose of this study is to enhance vocal quality and depressive symptoms of patients with PD using individual singing program.
Methods
The Individual Therapeutic Singing Program for PD (ITSP-PD) was conducted by a certified music therapist. In total, nine PD patients with a subjective voice problem or depression participated in 6 sessions over 2 weeks. We measured the Maximum Phonation Time (MPT) via the Praat test, the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS).
Results
In total, 8 out of 9 patients completed all the sessions; 6 out of 8 patients participated in the follow-up test after 6 months. A statistically significant change in MPT (p = 0.011) was observed between the pre- and post-tests. The VHI (p = 0.035) and the GDS (p = 0.018) were significantly lower in the post-test. In the pre-, post-, and follow-up tests, the MPT (p = 0.030), V-RQOL (p = 0.008), and GDS (p = 0.009) were significantly changed.
Conclusion
The ITSP-PD based on neurological singing therapy for PD showed therapeutic possibility for vocal function and depression in patients with PD. Our findings suggest the need for a randomized study to examine the continuing positive effects of the ITSP-PD over a longer period of time.

Citations

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  • Group singing improves both physical and psychological wellbeing in people with and without chronic health conditions: A narrative review
    Quinn Campbell, Sally Bodkin-Allen, Nicola Swain
    Journal of Health Psychology.2022; 27(8): 1897.     CrossRef
  • Defining the Therapeutic Singing Voice: Further Examination of the Everyday Singing Practices of Music Therapists
    Martina C Bingham, Elizabeth K Schwartz, Anthony Meadows
    Music Therapy Perspectives.2022; 40(1): 3.     CrossRef
  • Music affects functional brain connectivity and is effective in the treatment of neurological disorders
    Luisa Speranza, Salvatore Pulcrano, Carla Perrone-Capano, Umberto di Porzio, Floriana Volpicelli
    Reviews in the Neurosciences.2022; 33(7): 789.     CrossRef
  • Acute effects of singing on cardiovascular biomarkers
    Kamila Somayaji, Mogen Frenkel, Luai Tabaza, Alexis Visotcky, Tanya Kruse Ruck, Ernest Kwesi Ofori, Michael E. Widlansky, Jacquelyn Kulinski
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Music Therapy and Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review from 2015–2020
    Manuel Joaquín Machado Sotomayor, Víctor Arufe-Giráldez, Gerardo Ruíz-Rico, Rubén Navarro-Patón
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(21): 11618.     CrossRef
  • The use of music as an arts-based method in migrant health research: a scoping review protocol
    Fran Garry, Sylvia Murphy Tighe, Anne MacFarlane, Helen Phelan
    HRB Open Research.2020; 3: 75.     CrossRef
  • Walking the thin white line – managing voice in the older adult
    Jacqui Allen, Anna Miles
    Speech, Language and Hearing.2019; 22(1): 25.     CrossRef
  • Music Therapy and Music-Based Interventions for Movement Disorders
    Kerry Devlin, Jumana T. Alshaikh, Alexander Pantelyat
    Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Transfer Dysphagia Due to Focal Dystonia
Priyanka Samal, Vinay Goyal, Govind K Makharia, Chandan J Das, Sankar Prasad Gorthi, Vishnu V Y, Mamta Bhushan Singh, M V Padma Srivastava
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):129-132.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17081
  • 5,419 View
  • 117 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
The inability to propel a bolus of food successfully from the posterior part of the oral cavity to the oropharynx is defined as transfer dysphagia. The present case series describes the varied presentation of transfer dysphagia due to focal dystonia and highlights the importance of early detection by following up on strong suspicions.
Methods
We describe seven cases of transfer dysphagia due to focal dystonia. Transfer dysphagia as a form of focal dystonia may appear as the sole presenting complaint or may present with other forms of focal dystonia.
Results
Four out of seven patients had pure transfer dysphagia and had previously been treated for functional dysphagia. A high index of suspicion, barium swallow including videofluoroscopy, associated dystonia in other parts of the body and response to drug therapy with trihexyphenidyl/tetrabenazine helped to confirm the diagnosis.
Conclusion
Awareness of these clinical presentations among neurologists and non-neurologists can facilitate an early diagnosis and prevent unnecessary investigations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • EXCESSIVE CRYING IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY AND COMMUNICATION DEFICITS
    Nagabhushana Rao Potharaju
    GLOBAL JOURNAL FOR RESEARCH ANALYSIS.2022; : 25.     CrossRef
  • Oro-Pharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease and Related Movement Disorders
    Miseon Kwon, Jae-Hong Lee
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2019; 12(3): 152.     CrossRef
Musculoskeletal Problems Affect the Quality of Life of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Young Eun Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Ji Young Yun, Woong-Woo Lee, Hui-Jun Yang, Jong-Min Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):133-138.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18022
  • 6,244 View
  • 132 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Musculoskeletal problems are more common in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) than in normal elderly, but the impact of musculoskeletal problems on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with PD is unknown.
Methods
Four hundred consecutive patients with PD were enrolled for the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems and HRQoL. HRQoL was assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, which comprised physical health and mental health.
Results
Of the total patients, 265 patients had musculoskeletal problems, and 135 patients did not have musculoskeletal problems. Patients with musculoskeletal problems reported lower levels of HRQoL in terms of physical health than did patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). In women, all components of physical health were lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, in men, only the bodily pain score of physical health was lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems. Mental health and physical health were negatively correlated with depression, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale I & II scores, and pain severity from musculoskeletal problems, in that order (p < 0.01 for all).
Conclusion
These results suggest that musculoskeletal problems in patients with PD affect HRQoL significantly, mainly in terms of physical health rather than mental health and especially in women rather than men. Musculoskeletal problems should not be overlooked in the care of patients with PD.

Citations

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  • Quality of life of older adults in two contrasting neighbourhoods in Accra, Ghana
    Dominic A. Alaazi, Devidas Menon, Tania Stafinski, Stephen Hodgins, Gian Jhangri
    Social Science & Medicine.2021; 270: 113659.     CrossRef
  • The Efficiency of Spa Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke Patients—Preliminary Reports
    Bogumiła Pniak, Justyna Leszczak, Jadwiga Kurczab, Aleksandra Krzemińska, Joanna Pięta, Agnieszka Plis, Ewelina Czenczek-Lewandowska, Agnieszka Guzik
    Brain Sciences.2021; 11(4): 501.     CrossRef
  • An overview of pain in Parkinson's disease
    Yi-Cheng Tai, Chin-Hsien Lin
    Clinical Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2020; 2: 1.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Perspectives of Parkinson's Disease for Ophthalmologists, Otorhinolaryngologists, Cardiologists, Dentists, Gastroenterologists, Urologists, Physiatrists, and Psychiatrists
    Ji-Hyun Choi, Jong-Min Kim, Hee Kyung Yang, Hyo-Jung Lee, Cheol Min Shin, Seong Jin Jeong, Won-Seok Kim, Ji Won Han, In-Young Yoon, Yoo Sung Song, Yun Jung Bae
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Parkinson's Disease Is Associated with Increased Complications, Readmission Rates, and Costs of Care after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Matched-Cohort Analysis
    Simon Katz, Kevin B. Marchand, Rushabh M. Vakharia, Hiba Anis, Nipun Sodhi, Nicolas S. Piuzzi, Michael A. Mont, Martin W. Roche
    The Journal of Hip Surgery.2020; 4(03): 149.     CrossRef
  • Chronic Pain Treatment Strategies in Parkinson’s Disease
    Amber Edinoff, Niro Sathivadivel, Timothy McBride, Allyson Parker, Chikezie Okeagu, Alan D. Kaye, Adam M. Kaye, Jessica S. Kaye, Rachel J. Kaye, Meeta M. Sheth, Omar Viswanath, Ivan Urits
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  • Sex-specific effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on pain in Parkinson’s disease
    Olga Khazen, Marisa DiMarzio, Kelsey Platanitis, Heather C. Grimaudo, Maria Hancu, Miriam M. Shao, Michael D. Staudt, Lucy Maguire, Vishad V. Sukul, Jennifer Durphy, Era K. Hanspal, Octavian Adam, Eric Molho, Julie G. Pilitsis
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  • Sex differences in the short-term and long-term effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease
    Ryul Kim, Dallah Yoo, Ji-Hyun Choi, Jung Hwan Shin, Sangmin Park, Han-Joon Kim, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2019; 68: 73.     CrossRef
Cognition, Olfaction and Uric Acid in Early de novo Parkinson’s Disease
Hwa Reung Lee, Joong Hyun Park, Sang Won Han, Jong Sam Baik
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):139-144.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18037
  • 5,427 View
  • 138 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Cognitive impairment is one of the nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and olfactory dysfunction is used as a marker to detect premotor stages of PD. Serum uric acid (sUA) levels have been found to be a risk factor for PD. Our objective in this study was to examine whether sUA levels are associated with cognitive changes and olfactory dysfunction in early de novo PD patients.
Methods
The study participants included 196 de novo PD patients. We assessed cognitive function by the Korean versions of the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and assessed olfactory function by the Korean version of the Sniffin’ Sticks test.
Results
The mean sUA level was 4.7 mg/dL and was significantly lower in women than in men. Cognitive scores were lower in women, suggesting that sUA levels were related to cognitive function. The olfactory functions were not related to sUA level but were clearly associated with cognitive scores. Olfactory threshold, odor discrimination, and odor identification were all significantly related to cognitive scores.
Conclusion
We conclude that lower sUA levels were associated with cognitive impairment, not olfactory dysfunction, in de novo PD patients. This finding suggests that UA is neuroprotective as an antioxidant in the cognitive function of PD patients.

Citations

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  • International consensus statement on allergy and rhinology: Olfaction
    Zara M. Patel, Eric H. Holbrook, Justin H. Turner, Nithin D. Adappa, Mark W. Albers, Aytug Altundag, Simone Appenzeller, Richard M. Costanzo, Ilona Croy, Greg E. Davis, Puya Dehgani‐Mobaraki, Richard L. Doty, Valerie B. Duffy, Bradley J. Goldstein, David
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    Paola Tirassa, Tommaso Schirinzi, Marcello Raspa, Massimo Ralli, Antonio Greco, Antonella Polimeni, Roberta Possenti, Nicola Biagio Mercuri, Cinzia Severini
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    Per Borghammer, Nathalie Van Den Berge, Teus van Laar
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Case Report
A Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Presenting as Parkinsonism
Ji-Hyun Choi, Jee-Young Lee, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):145-148.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18028
  • 4,669 View
  • 96 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The current body of literature contains 5 reports of myotonic dystrophy (DM) with parkinsonism: 4 reports of DM type 2 and 1 report of clinically suspected DM type 1. To date, there have been no genetically proven cases of DM type 1 with parkinsonism. Here, we report the first case of genetically proven DM type 1 and parkinsonism that developed ahead of muscle symptoms with bilateral putaminal, presynaptic dopaminergic deficits on imaging. A 54-year-old female patient presented with bradykinesia, axial and bilateral limb rigidity, stooped posture, and hypomimia, which did not respond to levodopa. At age 56, she developed neck flexion weakness. Examination showed bilateral facial weakness, percussion and grip myotonia, and electromyography confirmed myotonic discharges. A genetic study of DM type 1 showed a DMPK mutation. At age 58, gait freezing, postural instability, and frequent falling developed and did not respond to increasing doses of levodopa. At age 59, the patient died from asphyxia.
Letter to the editor
Chorea in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
Ai Huey Tan, Tsun Haw Toh, Soon Chai Low, Si Lei Fong, Kah Kian Chong, Kee Wei Lee, Khean Jin Goh, Shen-Yang Lim
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):149-151.   Published online August 9, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18017
  • 4,777 View
  • 146 Download
  • 3 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Atypical and early symptoms of sporadic Creutzfeldt – Jakob disease: case series and review of the literature
    Grammatiki Katsikaki, Ioannis E. Dagklis, Petros Angelopoulos, Dimitrios Ntantos, Angeliki Prevezianou, Sevasti Bostantjopoulou
    International Journal of Neuroscience.2021; 131(9): 927.     CrossRef
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    Daniel Martinez-Ramirez, Ruth H. Walker, Mayela Rodríguez-Violante, Emilia M. Gatto
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    Yoonah Park, Chan-Nyeong Lee
    Dementia and Neurocognitive Disorders.2019; 18(4): 152.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders