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Volume 12(1); January 2019
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Review Articles
Abnormal Eye Movements in Parkinsonism and Movement Disorders
Ileok Jung, Ji-Soo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):1-13.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18034
  • 12,313 View
  • 756 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abnormal eye movements are commonly observed in movement disorders. Ocular motility examination should include bedside evaluation and laboratory recording of ocular misalignment, involuntary eye movements, including nystagmus and saccadic intrusions/oscillations, triggered nystagmus, saccades, smooth pursuit (SP), and the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) mostly show hypometric saccades, especially for the selfpaced saccades, and impaired SP. Early vertical saccadic palsy is characteristic of progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson’s syndrome. Patients with cortico-basal syndrome typically show a delayed onset of saccades. Downbeat and gaze-evoked nystagmus and hypermetric saccades are characteristic ocular motor findings in ataxic disorders due to cerebellar dysfunction. In this review, we discuss various ocular motor findings in movement disorders, including PD and related disorders, ataxic syndromes, and hyperkinetic movement disorders. Systemic evaluation of the ocular motor functions may provide valuable information for early detection and monitoring of movement disorders, despite an overlap in the abnormal eye movements among different movement disorders.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Head-impulse tests aid in differentiation of multiple system atrophy from Parkinson’s disease
    Jae-Gyum Kim, Sung-Hwan Kim, Sun-Uk Lee, Chan-Nyoung Lee, Byung-Jo Kim, Ji-Soo Kim, Kun-Woo Park
    Journal of Neurology.2022; 269(6): 2972.     CrossRef
  • Overt Oculomotor Behavior Reveals Covert Temporal Predictions
    Alessandro Tavano, Sonja A. Kotz
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Eye tracking identifies biomarkers in α-synucleinopathies versus progressive supranuclear palsy
    Mahboubeh Habibi, Wolfgang H. Oertel, Brian J. White, Donald C. Brien, Brian C. Coe, Heidi C. Riek, Julia Perkins, Rachel Yep, Laurent Itti, Lars Timmermann, Christoph Best, Elisabeth Sittig, Annette Janzen, Douglas P. Munoz
    Journal of Neurology.2022; 269(9): 4920.     CrossRef
  • A Case of AOA2 With Compound Heterozygous SETX Mutations
    Hee Jin Chang, Ryul Kim, Minchae Kim, Jangsup Moon, Man Jin Kim, Han-Joon Kim
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(2): 178.     CrossRef
  • Reading Warm-Up, Reading Skill, and Reading Prosody When Reading the My Grandfather Passage: An Exploratory Study Born Out of the Motor Planning Theory of Prosody and Reading Prosody Research
    Frank Boutsen, Eunsun Park, Justin D. Dvorak
    Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.2022; 65(6): 2047.     CrossRef
  • Eye movement abnormalities in neurodegenerative langerhans cell histiocytosis
    Lila Autier, Bertrand Gaymard, Eléonore Bayen, Antoine Del Cul, Fleur Cohen-Aubart, Nadine Martin-Duverneuil, Julien Haroche, Karima Mokhtari, Sébastien Héritier, Jean Donadieu, Khê Hoang-Xuan, Ahmed Idbaih
    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(11): 6539.     CrossRef
  • Multiple step saccades in simply reactive saccades could serve as a complementary biomarker for the early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease
    Wenbo Ma, Min Li, Junru Wu, Zhihao Zhang, Fangfang Jia, Mingsha Zhang, Hagai Bergman, Xuemei Li, Zhipei Ling, Xin Xu
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of age and sex on the incidence of multiple step saccades and corrective saccades
    Wenbo Ma, Mingsha Zhang
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Oculomotor impairments in de novo Parkinson’s disease
    Meng-Xi Zhou, Qin Wang, Yin Lin, Qian Xu, Li Wu, Ya-Jing Chen, Yu-Han Jiang, Qing He, Lei Zhao, You-Rong Dong, Jian-Ren Liu, Wei Chen
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Smartphone video nystagmography using convolutional neural networks: ConVNG
    Maximilian U. Friedrich, Erich Schneider, Miriam Buerklein, Johannes Taeger, Johannes Hartig, Jens Volkmann, Robert Peach, Daniel Zeller
    Journal of Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Eye movement especially vertical oculomotor impairment as an aid to assess Parkinson’s disease
    JianYuan Zhang, Bin Zhang, QingGuo Ren, Qing Zhong, Ye Li, GuoTao Liu, XiaoTian Ma, CuiPing Zhao
    Neurological Sciences.2021; 42(6): 2337.     CrossRef
  • Abnormalities of smooth pursuit in Parkinson’s disease: A systematic review
    Karen Frei
    Clinical Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 4: 100085.     CrossRef
  • Central nystagmus in progressive supranuclear palsy: A neglected clinical feature?
    Maja Klarendic, Manja Hribar, Nina Bozanic Urbancic, Nina Zupancic, Milica G. Kramberger, Maja Trost, Saba Battelino, Diego Kaski, Maja Kojovic
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 84: 15.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of vertical eye movements in Parkinson’s disease and its potential for diagnosis
    Sajjad Farashi
    Applied Intelligence.2021; 51(11): 8260.     CrossRef
  • Abnormal eye movements in parkinsonism: a historical view
    Tereza Ko, Augusto Mädke Brenner, Nicholas Pili Monteiro, Mariana Severo Debastiani, Alberto Chitolina Nesello, Arlete Hilbig
    Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria.2021; 79(5): 457.     CrossRef
  • Morphological classification and changes in dementia (Review)
    Alexandra Tudor, Antonia Vasile, Simona Trifu, Mihai Cristea
    Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • BCAP31-related syndrome: The first de novo report
    Berardo Rinaldi, Evelien Van Hoof, Anniek Corveleyn, Annick Van Cauter, Thomy de Ravel
    European Journal of Medical Genetics.2020; 63(2): 103732.     CrossRef
  • Hypomania and saccadic changes in Parkinson’s disease: influence of D2 and D3 dopaminergic signalling
    Esther A. Pelzer, Barbara Dillenburger, Sophie Grundmann, Vladimir Iliaev, Sophie Aschenberg, Corina Melzer, Martin Hess, Gereon R. Fink, Carsten Eggers, Marc Tittgemeyer, Lars Timmermann
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Management of Visual Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Joseph Savitt, Rachid Aouchiche, Bastiaan R. Bloem, Patrik Brundin
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2020; 10(s1): S49.     CrossRef
  • Ocular motor manifestations of movement disorders
    Grace F. Crotty, Bart K. Chwalisz
    Current Opinion in Ophthalmology.2019; 30(6): 443.     CrossRef
Pseudobulbar Affect in Parkinsonian Disorders: A Review
Mathew Hakimi, Carine W. Maurer
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):14-21.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18051
  • 7,618 View
  • 259 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) is a neurological symptom of inappropriate and uncontrollable laughter or crying that occurs secondary to a variety of neurological conditions, including parkinsonian disorders. PBA is a socially and emotionally debilitating symptom that has been estimated to affect 3.6% to 42.5% of the population with Parkinson’s disease. While indexing measures and treatment options for PBA have been extensively studied in neurological conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, there has been considerably less attention given in the literature to PBA in parkinsonian disorders. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of PBA, its prevalence and impact on quality of life in parkinsonian disorders, and the treatment options currently available. Areas requiring further study, including the development of standardized, cross-culturally validated methods of symptom assessment, and evidence-based studies exploring the efficacy of current treatment options in parkinsonian disorders, are also highlighted.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Pseudobulbar affect in neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Fardin Nabizadeh, Mahsa Nikfarjam, Mobin Azami, Hossein Sharifkazemi, Fatemeh Sodeifian
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.2022; 100: 100.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between stress, anxiety, and depression levels and pseudobulbar affect in patients with multiple sclerosis
    Duygu Özer, Elvan Emine Ata, Gül Dikeç, Serkan Demir
    Contemporary Nurse.2022; 58(4): 317.     CrossRef
  • Pathological laughter and crying in multiple system atrophy with different subtypes: Frequency and related factors
    LingYu Zhang, Bei Cao, Qian-Qian Wei, RuWei Ou, Bi Zhao, Jing Yang, Ying Wu, HuiFang Shang
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2021; 283: 60.     CrossRef
  • Mood Disorders and Anxiety in Parkinson’s Disease: Current Concepts
    Hendrik Lintel, Timothy Corpuz, Saif-ur-Rahman Paracha, George T. Grossberg
    Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology.2021; 34(4): 280.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) in Parkinson’s Disease: An Underrecognized Patient Burden
    Ramsey Falconer, David Whitney, Hannah Walters, Sean Rogers
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Emerging Perspectives in the Diagnosis and Management of Depression and Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease
    Sweta Bhoopatiraju, George Grossberg
    Neurology.2021; 17(2): 97.     CrossRef
  • Progressive supranukleäre Blickparese?
    Manuel Fuentes-Casan
    NeuroTransmitter.2020; 31(6): 42.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in a patient with a history of traumatic brain injury, partial brain resection, and brainstem stroke: a case report
    Fletcher Graham Young, Diep Nguyen
    Journal of Medical Case Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Sensory Trick Frames: A New Device for Blepharospasm Patients
Daniele Lorenzano, Steven Tansley, Daniel G. Ezra
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):22-26.   Published online January 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18010
  • 6,935 View
  • 164 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
To determine whether the use of unique customized spectacles provided with modified side arms may be helpful in reducing benign essential blepharospasm (BEB) in patients describing periocular sensory tricks (ST).
Methods
A prospective descriptive study of patients with BEB with positive periocular or temporal region ST phenomenon response under the care of the Botox Clinic at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK. Nine consecutive patients with BEB describing ST were recruited, and the disease frequency and severity were assessed with the Jankovic Rating Scale (JRS) and the Blepharospasm Disability Index (BSDI) before and after the use of the sensory trick frames (STF).
Results
A reduction in the score was noted in both severity (p = 0.0115) and frequency patterns (p = 0.0117) in the JRS in patients using the STF. A significant reduction of the BSDI score was also observed (p = 0.0314).
Conclusion
All the patients selected and fitted with the STF had a reduction in spasms and related symptoms. This new device may be helpful in some selected BEB patients who previously responded positively to periocular pressure alleviating maneuvers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Variability of Movement Disorders: The Influence of Sensation, Action, Cognition, and Emotions
    Rok Berlot, John C. Rothwell, Kailash P. Bhatia, Maja Kojović
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(3): 581.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Upper Eyelid Surgery on Symptom Severity and Frequency in Benign Essential Blepharospasm
    Hannah Mary Timlin, Kailun Jiang, Daniel George Ezra
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2021; 14(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • Benign essential blepharospasm: epidemiology, clinical manifestations, pathophysiology, botulinum toxin therapy
    Z. A. Zalyalova
    Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Psychosomatics.2021; 13(1): 119.     CrossRef
  • Best Practices in the Clinical Management of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Syndrome: A Consensus Statement of the CurePSP Centers of Care
    Brent Bluett, Alexander Y. Pantelyat, Irene Litvan, Farwa Ali, Diana Apetauerova, Danny Bega, Lisa Bloom, James Bower, Adam L. Boxer, Marian L. Dale, Rohit Dhall, Antoine Duquette, Hubert H. Fernandez, Jori E. Fleisher, Murray Grossman, Michael Howell, Di
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ocular motor manifestations of movement disorders
    Grace F. Crotty, Bart K. Chwalisz
    Current Opinion in Ophthalmology.2019; 30(6): 443.     CrossRef
The ‘Hot Cross Bun’ Sign Is Not Always Multiple System Atrophy: Etiologies of 11 Cases
Christopher Way, David Pettersson, Amie Hiller
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):27-30.   Published online December 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18031
  • 6,758 View
  • 278 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
To clarify the specificity of the ‘hot cross bun’ sign (HCBS) for multiple system atrophy (MSA) in adult cerebellar ataxia or parkinsonism.
Methods
The radiologic information systems at an academic center and affiliated veterans’ hospital were queried using the keywords ‘hot cross bun,’ ‘pontocerebellar,’ ‘cruciate,’ ‘cruciform,’ ‘MSA,’ ‘multiple system atrophy,’ and ‘multisystem atrophy.’ Scans were reviewed by a neurologist and neuroradiologist to identify the HCBS. Subjects with the HCBS were reviewed by 2 neurologists to identify the most likely etiology of the patient’s neurologic symptoms.
Results
Eleven cases were identified. Etiologies included MSA (4 probable, 2 possible), hereditary cerebellar ataxia (3/11), probable dementia with Lewy bodies (1/11), and uncertain despite autopsy (1/11).
Conclusion
MSA was the most common etiology. However, 5 of the 11 patients did not have MSA. The most common alternate etiology was an undefined hereditary cerebellar ataxia (3/11).

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mapping cortical disease-burden at individual-level in frontotemporal dementia: implications for clinical care and pharmacological trials
    Mary Clare McKenna, Marlene Tahedl, Jasmin Lope, Rangariroyashe H. Chipika, Stacey Li Hi Shing, Mark A. Doherty, Jennifer C. Hengeveld, Alice Vajda, Russell L. McLaughlin, Orla Hardiman, Siobhan Hutchinson, Peter Bede
    Brain Imaging and Behavior.2022; 16(3): 1196.     CrossRef
  • The “Black Straight-Line Sign” in the Putamen in Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: A Potential Diagnostic MRI Marker for Multiple System Atrophy
    Yiming Zheng, Xiwen Wang, Huajian Zhao, Yanyan Jiang, Ying Zhu, Jing Chen, Wei Sun, Zhaoxia Wang, Yunchuang Sun
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Radiological hints for differentiation of cerebellar multiple system atrophy from spinocerebellar ataxia
    Hung-Chieh Chen, Li-Hua Lee, Jiing-Feng Lirng, Bing-wen Soong
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The “Hot Cross Bun Sign” in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 2 and 7–Case Reports and Review of Literature
    Ansuya Kasavelu Naidoo, Cait‐Lynn Deanne Wells, Yashvir Rugbeer, Neil Naidoo
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2022; 9(8): 1105.     CrossRef
  • Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities as a marker of multiple system atrophy in isolated rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
    Amaia Muñoz-Lopetegi, Joan Berenguer, Alex Iranzo, Monica Serradell, Teresa Pujol, Carles Gaig, Esteban Muñoz, Eduard Tolosa, Joan Santamaría
    Sleep.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Inna Page, Frank Gaillard
    Practical Neurology.2020; 20(6): 463.     CrossRef
  • Various Diseases and Clinical Heterogeneity Are Associated With “Hot Cross Bun”
    Shuzhen Zhu, Hualing Li, Bin Deng, Jialing Zheng, Zifeng Huang, Zihan Chang, Yanjun Huang, Zhibo Wen, Yanran Liang, Mengjue Yu, Ling-Ling Chan, Eng-King Tan, Qing Wang
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hot cross bun sign
    M. Portet, M. Filyridou, D. C. Howlett
    Journal of Neurology.2019; 266(10): 2573.     CrossRef
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Corticobasal Degeneration, and Multiple System Atrophy
    Paul Greene
    CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology.2019; 25(4): 919.     CrossRef
  • Differential value of brain magnetic resonance imaging in multiple system atrophy cerebellar phenotype and spinocerebellar ataxias
    Minkyeong Kim, Jong Hyeon Ahn, Yoonsu Cho, Ji Sun Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
    Scientific Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Clinical Characteristics of Involuntary Movement in Hospitalized Patients
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Hye Mi Lee, Seon-Min Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):31-36.   Published online December 20, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18040
  • 5,102 View
  • 174 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Neurological symptoms in hospitalized patients are not rare, and neurological consultation for movement disorders is especially important in evaluating or managing those with various movement disorders. Therefore, we investigated a clinical pattern of in-hospital consultations for various movement disorders in a tertiary care university hospital.
Methods
Over two years, a total of 202 patients (70.7 ± 11.8 years of age) presenting with movement disorders referred to movement disorder specialists were investigated.
Results
The main symptoms referred by nonneurologists were tremor (56.9%), parkinsonism (16.8%), and gait disturbance (8.9%). The most frequent diagnostic category was toxic/metabolic-caused movement disorder (T/MCMD) (35%) with regard to medications, followed by Parkinson’s disease (PD) (16%). Regarding the mode of onset, T/MCMD was the leading cause for acute (68%) and subacute onset (46%), while PD was the leading disorder (31%) for chronic onset.
Conclusion
The current study showed a characteristic pattern of inpatients presenting with movement disorders. Furthermore, our findings highlighted the clinical significance of drug use or metabolic problems for treating this patient population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical Spectrum of Movement Disorders in Neurology Inpatients in a Tertiary Care Centre
    Shabeer Ahmad Paul, Gouranga Prasad Mondal, Ramesh Bhattacharyya, Kartik Chandra Ghosh, Sarbajit Das, Suman Das, Hema Krishna, Chandrakanta Patra
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice.2021; 12(03): 581.     CrossRef
Less Pulsatile Levodopa Therapy (6 Doses Daily) Is Associated with a Reduced Incidence of Dyskinesia
Mark M. Lin, Robert Laureno
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):37-42.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18046
  • 6,851 View
  • 243 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
To evaluate whether less pulsatile levodopa therapy (LPT) can reduce the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID).
Methods
This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with Parkinson’s disease at the movement disorders clinic of Medstar Washington Hospital Center. The study was not blinded or randomized. Patients were seen between August 2002 and August 2018. During these years, we treated patients with less pulsatile (6 doses daily) levodopa treatment to reduce LID. Occurrence of LID was recorded.
Results
Ninety-five patients with Parkinson’s disease taking levodopa were divided into two groups: 1) patients who were initially managed on LPT or who switched from traditional therapy (TT) (n = 61) (mean disease duration: 7.7 ± 4.8 years, mean levodopa duration: 5.6 ± 4.5 years and mean observation time: 4.3 ± 3.4 years), and 2) patients on TT throughout the observation period or until they developed dyskinesia (n = 34) (mean disease duration: 8.3 ± 3.8 years, mean levodopa duration: 6.2 ± 4.2 years and mean observation time: 4.1 ± 3.4 years). Three of the 61 LPT patients developed dyskinesia during the observation period. One of the patients developed dyskinesia after being switched to pulsatile doses by another doctor. In the other two, dyskinesia was minimal. In contrast to this 4.9% cumulative incidence, dyskinesia occurred in 50% (17/34) of TT patients, an incidence similar to that in published data (p < 0.001).
Conclusion
Less pulsatile levodopa with 6 daily doses was associated with a low incidence of LID. Further study of this method of treatment is warranted.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Personalized Medicine Approach in Treating Parkinson’s Disease, Using Oral Administration of Levodopa/Carbidopa Microtablets in Clinical Practice
    Helga María Grétarsdóttir, Erik Widman, Anders Johansson, Dag Nyholm
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(8): 720.     CrossRef
  • Current Knowledge on the Background, Pathophysiology and Treatment of Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia—Literature Review
    Michał Hutny, Jagoda Hofman, Aleksandra Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Agnieszka Gorzkowska
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(19): 4377.     CrossRef
  • Pallidal versus subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for levodopa‐induced dyskinesia
    Shi‐Ying Fan, Kai‐Liang Wang, Wei Hu, Robert S. Eisinger, Alexander Han, Chun‐Lei Han, Qiao Wang, Shimabukuro Michitomo, Jian‐Guo Zhang, Feng Wang, Adolfo Ramirez‐Zamora, Fan‐Gang Meng
    Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology.2020; 7(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • A Stage-Based Approach to Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease
    Claudia Carrarini, Mirella Russo, Fedele Dono, Martina Di Pietro, Marianna G. Rispoli, Vincenzo Di Stefano, Laura Ferri, Filomena Barbone, Michela Vitale, Astrid Thomas, Stefano Luca Sensi, Marco Onofrj, Laura Bonanni
    Biomolecules.2019; 9(8): 388.     CrossRef
  • The Gut Microbiome: A Therapeutically Targetable Site of Peripheral Levodopa Metabolism
    Eoin Mulroy, Kailash P. Bhatia
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2019; 6(7): 547.     CrossRef
Brief communication
Assessment of Bone Mineral Density of Patients with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3
Aline MS Farias, Simone Appenzeller, Marcondes C França, Alberto RM Martinez, Elba E Etchebehere, Thiago F Souza, Allan O Santos
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):43-46.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18041
  • 4,410 View
  • 75 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a spinocerebellar ataxia, and osteoporosis is a multifactor disease that may affect patients with neurologic conditions. The frequency of osteoporosis among MJD patients, however, has not been studied. The purpose of this study is to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and identify correlations between clinical factors and frequency of vertebral fractures in patients with MJD.
Methods
Clinical data, lumbar X-rays and BMD data were obtained in 30 patients with MJD.
Results
Ten patients (33.3%) showed low BMD in at least one of the sites studied based on Z-scores. The Z-score correlated directly with body mass index, and the femoral neck Z-score was inversely correlated with cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) expansion. There was no correlation between BMD and other clinical factors. Forty-three percent of the patients reported previous pathologic fractures. Five patients (16.7%) had at least one fracture detected by lumbar X-ray.
Conclusion
Low BMD and fractures are frequent among MJD patients, and careful management of BMD may be beneficial for these patients.

Citations

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  • Overview of the Clinical Approach to Individuals With Cerebellar Ataxia and Neuropathy
    Leslie J. Roberts, Michael McVeigh, Linda Seiderer, Ian H. Harding, Louise A. Corben, Martin Delatycki, David J. Szmulewicz
    Neurology Genetics.2022; 8(5): e200021.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Neurological Disorders on Bone Health
    Ryan R. Kelly, Sara J. Sidles, Amanda C. LaRue
    Frontiers in Psychology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Treatment of Hemichoreoathetosis with Arrhythmic Proximal Tremor after Stroke: The Role of Zona Incerta as a Target for Deep Brain Stimulation
Andrei Koerbel, Augusto Radünz do Amaral, Helena Bedatti Zeh, Eduardo Wollmann, Renata Fabiola Heil Koerbel, Carla Moro, Alexandre Luiz Longo
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):47-51.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18032
  • 5,270 View
  • 107 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the zona incerta has shown promising results in the reduction of medically refractory movement disorders. However, evidence supporting its efficacy in movement disorders secondary to hemorrhagic stroke or hemichoreoathetosis is limited. We describe a 48-year-old man who developed progressive hemichoreoathetosis with an arrhythmic, proximal tremor in his right arm following a thalamic hemorrhagic stroke. Pharmacological treatment was carried out with no change in the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) score after 4 weeks (14). After six sessions of botulinum toxin treatment, a subtle improvement in the AIMS score (13) was registered, but no clinical improvement was noted. The arrhythmic proximal movements were significantly improved after DBS of the zona incerta with a major decrease in the patient’s AIMS score (8). The response to DBS occurring after the failure of pharmacological and botulinum toxin treatments suggests that zona incerta DBS may be an alternative for postthalamic hemorrhage movement disorders.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders after stroke: a systematic review of the literature
    Mitch R. Paro, Michal Dyrda, Srinath Ramanan, Grant Wadman, Stacey-Ann Burke, Isabella Cipollone, Cory Bosworth, Sarah Zurek, Patrick B. Senatus
    Journal of Neurosurgery.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Deep brain stimulation for post-thalamic stroke complex movement disorders
    A. Macerollo, B. Hammersley, M. Bonello, J. Somerset, D. Bhargava, K. Das, J. Osman-Farah, P. R. Eldridge, S. H. Alusi
    Neurological Sciences.2021; 42(1): 337.     CrossRef
  • Neurologic Manifestations of Systemic Disease: Movement Disorders
    Giulietta M. Riboldi, Steven J. Frucht
    Current Treatment Options in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Letters to the editor
Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Presented Following Concussion
Norman Cottrill, Brian McCully, Mary Payne
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):52-53.   Published online December 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18027
  • 5,299 View
  • 72 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDF

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  • Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: an expert consensus in China
    Li Cao, Xiaojun Huang, Ning Wang, Zhiying Wu, Cheng Zhang, Weihong Gu, Shuyan Cong, Jianhua Ma, Ling Wei, Yanchun Deng, Qi Fang, Qi Niu, Jin Wang, Zhaoxia Wang, You Yin, Jinyong Tian, Shufen Tian, Hongyan Bi, Hong Jiang, Xiaorong Liu, Yang Lü, Meizhen Sun
    Translational Neurodegeneration.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Gait Dyspraxia due to Right Occipital Infarct
Halil Onder, Ferda Buyuk
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):54-56.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18033
  • 4,487 View
  • 64 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Call Center Operator’s Dystonia
Dokyung Lee, Jung A Kim
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):57-59.   Published online December 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18038
  • 4,411 View
  • 61 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Transient Hypersomnolence Provoked by Metoclopramide in a Patient with Degenerative Parkinsonism
Sang-Won Yoo, Ko Eun Choi, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):60-62.   Published online January 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18042
  • 5,319 View
  • 82 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDF

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Novel Ferritin Light Chain Gene Mutation in a Korean Patient with Neuroferritinopathy
So Hoon Yoon, Nan Young Kim, Yun Joong Kim, Chul Hyoung Lyoo
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):63-65.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18062
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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders