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Volume 13(2); May 2020
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Review Articles
Long-Term Outcomes of Genetic Parkinson’s Disease
Jan O. Aasly
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):81-96.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19080
  • 10,160 View
  • 363 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1–2% of people by the age of 70 years. Age is the most important risk factor, and most cases are sporadic without any known environmental or genetic causes. Since the late 1990s, mutations in the genes SNCA, PRKN, LRRK2, PINK1, DJ-1, VPS35, and GBA have been shown to be important risk factors for PD. In addition, common variants with small effect sizes are now recognized to modulate the risk for PD. Most studies in genetic PD have focused on finding new genes, but few have studied the long-term outcome of patients with the specific genetic PD forms. Patients with known genetic PD have now been followed for more than 20 years, and we see that they may have distinct and different prognoses. New therapeutic possibilities are emerging based on the genetic cause underlying the disease. Future medication may be based on the pathophysiology individualized to the patient’s genetic background. The challenge is to find the biological consequences of different genetic variants. In this review, the clinical patterns and long-term prognoses of the most common genetic PD variants are presented.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • PTEN-Induced Putative Kinase 1 Dysfunction Accelerates Synucleinopathy
    Tinh Thi Nguyen, Yun Joong Kim, Thuy Thi Lai, Phuong Thi Nguyen, Young Ho Koh, Linh Thi Nhat Nguyen, Hyeo-il Ma, Young Eun Kim
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; 12(4): 1201.     CrossRef
  • Oncogenic Pathways in Neurodegenerative Diseases
    Luis Varela, Maria E. R. Garcia-Rendueles
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(6): 3223.     CrossRef
  • Genetic Determinants of Survival in Parkinson's Disease in the Asian Population
    Chunyu Li, Yanbing Hou, Ruwei Ou, Xiaojing Gu, Yongping Chen, Lingyu Zhang, Kuncheng Liu, Junyu Lin, Bei Cao, Qianqian Wei, Xueping Chen, Wei Song, Bi Zhao, Ying Wu, Yiyuan Cui, Huifang Shang
    Movement Disorders.2022; 37(8): 1624.     CrossRef
  • Obituary for Jan O. Aasly (1950–2022)
    Matthew J. Farrer
    Movement Disorders.2022; 37(9): 1783.     CrossRef
  • Genetics in parkinson’s disease: From better disease understanding to machine learning based precision medicine
    Mohamed Aborageh, Peter Krawitz, Holger Fröhlich
    Frontiers in Molecular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Recent developments in nucleic acid-based therapies for Parkinson’s disease: Current status, clinical potential, and future strategies
    Shivam Kumar Pandey, Rakesh Kumar Singh
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Genetic stratification of motor and QoL outcomes in Parkinson's disease in the EARLYSTIM study
    Daniel Weiss, Zied Landoulsi, Patrick May, Manu Sharma, Michael Schüpbach, Hana You, Jean Christophe Corvol, Steffen Paschen, Ann-Kristin Helmers, Michael Barbe, Gereon Fink, Andrea A. Kühn, Christine Brefel Courbon, Lars Wojtecki, Philippe Damier, Valeri
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 103: 169.     CrossRef
  • Inflammatory Diseases Among Norwegian LRRK2 Mutation Carriers. A 15-Years Follow-Up of a Cohort
    Jan O. Aasly
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Increased Mortality in Young-Onset Parkinson’s Disease
    Eldbjørg Hustad, Tor Åge Myklebust, Sasha Gulati, Jan O. Aasly
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2021; 14(3): 214.     CrossRef
  • Contributing Factors and Evolution of Impulse Control Disorder in the Luxembourg Parkinson Cohort
    Sylvia Binck, Claire Pauly, Michel Vaillant, Geraldine Hipp, Manon Gantenbein, Rejko Krueger, Nico J Diederich
    Frontiers in Neurology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Nutrition and Lifestyle Interventions for Managing Parkinson’s Disease: A Narrative Review
Tracy Lister
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):97-104.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20006
  • 9,636 View
  • 495 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The etiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is not fully understood, but environmental toxin overexposure, increased intestinal permeability, and dysbiosis related to nutrition and lifestyle habits are thought to be contributors. Considering these nutrition and lifestyle implications, there is a lack of practice-based programs utilizing interventions for managing symptoms or slowing the progression of the disease. The purpose of this narrative review was to identify relevant research related to nutrition and lifestyle interventions for PD, evaluate the research utilizing the evidence analysis process of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to assess the quality of each research article, and group the research into categories. A grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) of either good, fair, limited, or not assignable was allocated to each category of research, including diet patterns, vitamin D, B-complex, omega-3 fatty acids, coenzyme Q10, probiotics, physical activity, stress, and sleep. An intervention based on the research presented in the review may be utilized for coaching people with PD on symptom management.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effect of vitamin D and other indicators of phosphorus-calcium metabolism on cognitive functions and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease
    D. A. Novotnyy, N. G. Zhukova, L. P. Shperling, V. A. Stolyarova, I. A. Zhukova, A. E. Agasheva, S. V. Shtaimets, O. A. Druzhinina, I. V. Shirokikh
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  • Do Naturally Occurring Antioxidants Protect Against Neurodegeneration of the Dopaminergic System? A Systematic Revision in Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease
    Carmen Costas, Lilian R.F. Faro
    Current Neuropharmacology.2022; 20(2): 432.     CrossRef
  • Laboratory prognostic factors for the long-term survival of multiple system atrophy
    Jung Hwan Shin, Han-Joon Kim, Chan Young Lee, Hee Jin Chang, Kyung Ah Woo, Beomseok Jeon
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Qualitative Analysis of Experiences With Food-Related Activities Among People Living With Parkinson Disease and Their Care-Partners
    Christine C. Ferguson, Seung Eun Jung, Jeannine C. Lawrence, Joy W. Douglas, Anne Halli-Tierney, Chuong Bui, Amy C. Ellis
    Journal of Applied Gerontology.2022; : 073346482211183.     CrossRef
COVID-19: An Early Review of Its Global Impact and Considerations for Parkinson’s Disease Patient Care
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Sasivimol Virameteekul, Jong-Min Kim, Pramod Kr. Pal, Sun-Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):105-114.   Published online April 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20042
  • 16,914 View
  • 740 Download
  • 42 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
While many infectious disorders are unknown to most neurologists, COVID-19 is very different. It has impacted neurologists and other health care workers, not only in our professional lives but also through the fear and panic within our own families, colleagues, patients and their families, and even in the wider public. COVID-19 affects all sorts of individuals, but the elderly with underlying chronic conditions are particularly at risk of severe disease, or even death. Parkinson’s disease (PD) shares a common profile as an age-dependent degenerative disorder, frequently associated with comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular diseases, so PD patients will almost certainly fall into the high-risk group. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explore the risk of COVID-19 in PD based on the susceptibility to severe disease, its impact on PD disease severity, potential long-term sequelae, and difficulties of PD management during this outbreak, where neurologists face various challenges on how we can maintain effective care for PD patients without exposing them, or ourselves, to the risk of infection. It is less than six months since the identification of the original COVID-19 case on New Year’s Eve 2019, so it is still too early to fully understand the natural history of COVID-19 and the evidence on COVID-19-related PD is scant. Though the possibilities presented are speculative, they are theory-based, and supported by prior evidence from other neurotrophic viruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2. Neurologists should be on high alert and vigilant for potential acute and chronic complications when encountering PD patients who are suspected of having COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Doctor Hope; Calming and Comforting Loneliness in Parkinson’s Disease
    Sasivimol Virameteekul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Clinical Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 6: 100131.     CrossRef
  • Neurological toll of COVID-19
    Shivam Bhola, Jhillika Trisal, Vikram Thakur, Parneet Kaur, Saurabh Kulshrestha, Shashi Kant Bhatia, Pradeep Kumar
    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(4): 2171.     CrossRef
  • Resilience and Trauma among Patients with Parkinson’s Disease during the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Roberto Erro, Sofia Cuoco, Emanuele Nigro, Raffaele Ragone, Paolo Barone
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Implication of Covid-19 on Neurological Complications with Specific Emphasis on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease
    Ankita Sood, Ravi Goyal, Harshdeep Singh, Tapan Behl, Sandeep Arora, Balraj Saini, Rajwinder Kaur
    CNS & Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets.2022; 21(3): 235.     CrossRef
  • The use of amantadine in the prevention of progression and treatment of COVID-19 symptoms in patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus (COV-PREVENT): Study rationale and design
    Konrad Rejdak, Piotr Fiedor, Robert Bonek, Aleksander Goch, Agnieszka Gala-Błądzińska, Waldemar Chełstowski, Jacek Łukasiak, Sławomir Kiciak, Piotr Dąbrowski, Mateusz Dec, Zbigniew J. Król, Ewa Papuć, Adriana Zasybska, Agnieszka Segiet, Paweł Grieb
    Contemporary Clinical Trials.2022; 116: 106755.     CrossRef
  • Neuropathological Aspects of SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Significance for Both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease
    Jaime Silva, Felipe Patricio, Aleidy Patricio-Martínez, Gerardo Santos-López, Lilia Cedillo, Yousef Tizabi, Ilhuicamina Daniel Limón
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Online dance classes during the Covid-19 pandemic: new challenges and teaching strategies for the ‘Dance & Parkinson’s at home’ project
    Marcela Dos Santos Delabary, Isadora Loch Sbeghen, Mariana Wolffenbuttel, Djefri Ramon Pereira, Aline Nogueira Haas
    Research in Dance Education.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Chronic Neurological Disorders: Focus on Patients with Dementia
    Maria Antonietta Barbieri, Gianluca Bagnato, Carmelo Ioppolo, Antonio Giovanni Versace, Natasha Irrera
    CNS & Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets.2022; 21(10): 1017.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Maryam Afraie, Ghobad Moradi, Pardis Mohammadzedeh, Mobin Azami, Sevda Riyahifar, Yousef Moradi
    Acta Neurologica Belgica.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Attitudes toward telemedicine of patients with Parkinson’s disease during the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Kanako Kurihara, Koichi Nagaki, Kotoe Inoue, Sumiko Yamamoto, Takayasu Mishima, Shinsuke Fujioka, Shinji Ouma, Yoshio Tsuboi
    Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience.2021; 9(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Hospitalization and Death for COVID ‐19 in People with Parkinson's Disease or Parkinsonism
    Luca Vignatelli, Corrado Zenesini, Laura M.B. Belotti, Elisa Baldin, Giuseppe Bonavina, Giovanna Calandra‐Buonaura, Pietro Cortelli, Carlo Descovich, Giovanni Fabbri, Giulia Giannini, Maria Guarino, Roberta Pantieri, Giuseppe Samoggia, Cesa Scaglione, Sus
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Impact of COVID-19 in the Mental Health in Elderly: Psychological and Biological Updates
    Roberta Eduarda Grolli, Maiqueli Eduarda Dama Mingoti, Amanda Gollo Bertollo, Adriana Remião Luzardo, João Quevedo, Gislaine Zilli Réus, Zuleide Maria Ignácio
    Molecular Neurobiology.2021; 58(5): 1905.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19: Implications for Sudden Death in Parkinson’s Disease
    Ana Claudia Fiorini, Marcelo Cunio Machado Fonseca, Carla Alessandra Scorza, Josef Finsterer, Antônio Márcio Rodrigues, Antônio-Carlos Guimarães de Almeida, Fulvio Alexandre Scorza
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2021; 14(1): 78.     CrossRef
  • Impact and Challenges of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Patients Requiring Botulinum Toxin A Treatment
    Azalea Tenerife Pajo, Adrian Isidoro Espiritu, Roland Dominic Go Jamora
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2021; 14(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 in age-related neurodegenerative diseases: is there a role for vitamin D3 as a possible therapeutic strategy?
    Milena de Barros Viana, Bárbara dos Anjos Rosário, Maria de Fátima Santana de Nazaré, Débora Estadella, Daniel Araki Ribeiro, Glauce Socorro de Barros Viana
    Reviews in the Neurosciences.2021; 32(2): 235.     CrossRef
  • How COVID-19 will boost remote exercise-based treatment in Parkinson’s disease: a narrative review
    Agnes Langer, Lucia Gassner, Anna Flotz, Sebastian Hasenauer, Jakob Gruber, Laurenz Wizany, Rochus Pokan, Walter Maetzler, Heidemarie Zach
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Neurological Manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 Induced Inflammation and Possible Therapeutic Strategies Against COVID-19
    Dipak Kumar, Sadaf Jahan, Andleeb Khan, Arif Jamal Siddiqui, Neeru Singh Redhu, Wahajuddin, Johra Khan, Saeed Banwas, Bader Alshehri, Mohammed Alaidarous
    Molecular Neurobiology.2021; 58(7): 3417.     CrossRef
  • Auswirkungen der COVID-19 Pandemie auf die medizinische Versorgung von Patienten mit angeborenen Blutungsneigungen
    Martin Olivieri, Susan Halimeh, Cornelia Wermes, Wolf Hassenpflug, Katharina Holstein, Sylvia von Mackensen
    Das Gesundheitswesen.2021; 83(04): 282.     CrossRef
  • Parkinsonism hyperpyraexia syndrome in Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation: An indirect consequence of COVID-19 lockdowns
    Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Sasivimol Virameteekul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 87: 39.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Profiles and Mortality of COVID ‐19 Inpatients with Parkinson's Disease in Germany
    Raphael Scherbaum, Eun Hae Kwon, Daniel Richter, Dirk Bartig, Ralf Gold, Christos Krogias, Lars Tönges
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(5): 1049.     CrossRef
  • Chronic pain experience and health inequities during the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada: qualitative findings from the chronic pain & COVID-19 pan-Canadian study
    Lise Dassieu, M. Gabrielle Pagé, Anaïs Lacasse, Maude Laflamme, Vickie Perron, Audrée Janelle-Montcalm, Maria Hudspith, Gregg Moor, Kathryn Sutton, James M Thompson, Manon Choinière
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  • The Influence of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) On Parkinson’s Disease: An Updated Systematic Review
    Vikash Jaiswal, Danah Alquraish, Zouina Sarfraz, Azza Sarfraz, Shavy Nagpal, Prakriti Singh Shrestha, Dattatreya Mukherjee, Prathima Guntipalli, Diana F. Sánchez Velazco, Arushee Bhatnagar, Saloni Savani, Elmjedina Halilaj, Samir Ruxmohan, Wilson Cueva
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  • Personalized Medicine in Parkinson’s Disease: New Options for Advanced Treatments
    Takayasu Mishima, Shinsuke Fujioka, Takashi Morishita, Tooru Inoue, Yoshio Tsuboi
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  • Parkinson's disease patients may have higher rates of Covid-19 mortality in Iran
    Mehri Salari, Masoud Etemadifar, Farzad Ashrafi, Davood Ommi, Zahra Aminzade, Sepand Tehrani Fateh
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    Galit Yogev-Seligmann, Michal Kafri
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    Yue Hui Lau, Keng Ming Lau, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim
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  • Parkinson’s Disease and the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Review Article on the Association between SARS-CoV-2 and α-Synucleinopathy
    Smriti Sinha, Swati Mittal, Rupali Roy
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2021; 14(3): 184.     CrossRef
  • Impact of COVID‐19 on Patient Care, Training, and Research in Movement Disorders in MDS‐AOS Region
    Shweta Prasad, Hrishikesh Kumar, Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Pramod Kumar Pal
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(11): 2457.     CrossRef
  • Secondary Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on People with Parkinson’s Disease—Results of a Polish Online Survey
    Karolina Krzysztoń, Beata Mielańczuk-Lubecka, Jakub Stolarski, Anna Poznańska, Katarzyna Kępczyńska, Agata Zdrowowicz, Izabela Domitrz, Jan Kochanowski
    Brain Sciences.2021; 12(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • Neurological consultations and diagnoses in a large, dedicated COVID-19 university hospital
    Adalberto STUDART-NETO, Bruno Fukelmann GUEDES, Raphael de Luca e TUMA, Antonio Edvan CAMELO FILHO, Gabriel Taricani KUBOTA, Bruno Diógenes IEPSEN, Gabriela Pantaleão MOREIRA, Júlia Chartouni RODRIGUES, Maíra Medeiros Honorato FERRARI, Rafael Bernhart CAR
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  • Potential impact and challenges associated with Parkinson’s disease patient care amidst the COVID-19 global pandemic
    Ali Elbeddini, Anthony To, Yasamin Tayefehchamani, Cindy Wen
    Journal of Clinical Movement Disorders.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and possible links with Parkinson’s disease and parkinsonism: from bench to bedside
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  • Impact of Prolonged Lockdown due to COVID-19 in Patients with Parkinson's Disease
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  • Effects of COVID-19 Lockdown on Movement Disorders Patients With Deep Brain Stimulation: A Multicenter Survey
    Carla Piano, Francesco Bove, Tommaso Tufo, Isabella Imbimbo, Danilo Genovese, Alessandro Stefani, Massimo Marano, Antonella Peppe, Livia Brusa, Rocco Cerroni, Francesco Motolese, Enrico Di Stasio, Marianna Mazza, Antonio Daniele, Alessandro Olivi, Paolo C
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Viewpoint
Future of Tanscranial Magnetic Stimulation in Movement Disorders: Introduction of Novel Methods
Yoshikazu Ugawa, Yasushi Shimo, Yasuo Terao
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):115-117.   Published online April 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19083
  • 3,739 View
  • 192 Download
  • 3 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material

Citations

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  • Neurotechnological Approaches to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease
    Shen Ning, Mehdi Jorfi, Shaun R. Patel, Doo Yeon Kim, Rudolph E. Tanzi
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Original Articles
The Non-Motor Symptom Profile of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Sudhakar Pushpa Chaithra, Shweta Prasad, Vikram Venkappayya Holla, Albert Stezin, Nitish Kamble, Ravi Yadav, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):118-126.   Published online April 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19066
  • 5,514 View
  • 223 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Non-motor symptoms (NMSs) significantly contribute to increased morbidity and poor quality of life in patients with parkinsonian disorders. This study aims to explore the profile of NMSs in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) using the validated Non-Motor Symptom Scale (NMSS).
Methods
Seventy-six patients with PSP were evaluated in this study. Motor symptoms and NMSs were evaluated using the PSP Rating Scale (PSPRS), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-III, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Hamilton Depression (HAMD) and Anxiety Rating Scales, Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and NMSS. NMS severity and prevalence were also compared between patients with PSP-Richardson syndrome (PSP-RS) and those with PSP-parkinsonism.
Results
All subjects in this cohort reported at least 2 NMSs. The most prevalent NMSs in patients with PSP were in the domains of sleep/fatigue, mood/cognition, and sexual function. The least prevalent NMSs were in the domains of cardiovascular including falls, and perceptual problems/hallucinations. Significant correlations were observed between the NMSS scores and HAM-D, PDSS, PSPRS scores and PSPRS sub-scores. The severity of NMSs was unrelated to the duration of illness. Patients with PSP-RS reported a higher severity of drooling, altered smell/taste, depression and altered interest in sex and a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction.
Conclusion
NMSs are commonly observed in patients with PSP, and the domains of sleep, mood and sexual function are most commonly affected. These symptoms contribute significantly to disease morbidity, and clinicians should pay adequate attention to identifying and addressing these symptoms.

Citations

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Long-term Effects of Bilateral Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Postural Instability and Gait Difficulty in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Hae-Won Shin, Mi Sun Kim, Sung Reul Kim, Sang Ryong Jeon, Sun Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):127-132.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19081
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The long-term effects of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on postural instability and gait difficulty (PIGD) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the longterm effects of STN-DBS surgery on PIGD symptoms in patients with advanced-stage PD. Methods This study included 49 consecutively included patients with PD who underwent bilateral STN-DBS. The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores and subscores for PIGD were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, and 5 years postoperatively. The PIGD subscore was divided into PIGD-motor and PIGD-activities of daily living (ADL) scores according to parts III and II of the UPDRS, respectively. Results The PIGD-motor and PIGD-ADL scores at the “medication-off” state improved at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Overall, the UPDRS III and II scores at “medication-off” improved at 5 years. The UPDRS IV score also significantly improved and the levodopa equivalent daily dosage decreased at all follow-ups. Finally, the PIGD-motor score at baseline was able to predict long-term improvement in the PIGD-motor score at the 5-year follow-up. Conclusion The STN-DBS has both short- and long-term effects on PIGD, as well as overall motor function, in patients with advanced PD. The degree of PIGD at the preoperative evaluation can be used to predict long-term outcomes after STN-DBS surgery.

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  • The Role of Microelectrode Recording in Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery for Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    R. Saman Vinke, Martin Geerlings, Ashok K. Selvaraj, Dejan Georgiev, Bastiaan R. Bloem, Rianne A.J. Esselink, Ronald H.M.A. Bartels
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; 12(7): 2059.     CrossRef
  • Axial impairment and falls in Parkinson’s disease: 15 years of subthalamic deep brain stimulation
    Alessandro Zampogna, Francesco Cavallieri, Francesco Bove, Antonio Suppa, Anna Castrioto, Sara Meoni, Pierre Pélissier, Emmanuelle Schmitt, Amélie Bichon, Eugénie Lhommée, Andrea Kistner, Stephan Chabardès, Eric Seigneuret, Valerie Fraix, Elena Moro
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-term motor outcomes of deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus interna in Parkinson's disease patients: Five-year follow-up
    Yun Su Hwang, Sungyang Jo, Seung Hyun Lee, Nayoung Kim, Mi-Sun Kim, Sang Ryong Jeon, Sun Ju Chung
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; : 120484.     CrossRef
Association between Olfactory Deficit and Motor and Cognitive Function in Parkinson’s Disease
Han Soo Yoo, Seok Jong Chung, Yang Hyun Lee, Byoung Seok Ye, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):133-141.   Published online April 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19082
  • 6,600 View
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  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate whether baseline olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients is associated with baseline and longitudinal motor and cognitive function.
Methods
We recruited 228 drug-naïve PD patients who were followed for a mean of 6 years. Patients underwent the Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test (CCSIT), a neuropsychological test, and N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane positron emission tomography within 6 months of the baseline evaluation. Olfactory dysfunction was categorized as normosmia (CCSIT score ≥ 9), hyposmia (CCSIT score 5–8), and anosmia (CCSIT score ≤ 4). During the follow-up period, we investigated changes in the levodopa-equivalent dose (LED) and the occurrence of wearing-off, levodopa-induced dyskinesia, and dementia.
Results
Among the PD patients, 80.7% were hyposmic at the time of diagnosis, and 26.1% were anosmic. Baseline olfactory dysfunction was not associated with either initial parkinsonian motor symptoms or with the longitudinal LED increment and motor complications. Meanwhile, the anosmic group had lower baseline scores on the Korea version of the Boston Naming Test and Stroop color reading test than the normosmic and hyposmic groups. The anosmic group exhibited a higher rate of conversion to dementia than the normosmic [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 3.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–14.72] and hyposmic (adjusted HR 2.48, 95% CI 1.15–5.32) PD groups, regardless of baseline motor deficits and cognitive status.
Conclusion
Baseline olfactory dysfunction was not associated with motor deficits and complications, but it was associated with cognitive dysfunction and prognosis, suggesting that severe olfactory impairment may reflect early cortical involvement, probably in the frontotemporal region, and rapid spreading of Lewy body pathology.

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  • Olfactory dysfunction is associated with motor function only in tremor-dominant Parkinson’s disease
    Fardin Nabizadeh, Kasra Pirahesh, Elham Khalili
    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(7): 4193.     CrossRef
  • Novel diagnostic tools for identifying cognitive impairment using olfactory-stimulated functional near-infrared spectroscopy: patient-level, single-group, diagnostic trial
    Jaewon Kim, Dong Keon Yon, Kyu Yeong Choi, Jang Jae Lee, Namwoo Kim, Kun Ho Lee, Jae Gwan Kim
    Alzheimer's Research & Therapy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Role of Olfactory System in the Etiogenesis of Parkinson’s Diseases: An Overview
    Jiju Narayanan Avanipully, Dithu Thekkekkara, Sahyadri M, Vipan K. Parihar, Santhepete Nanjundaiah Manjula
    Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics.2022; 13(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • International consensus statement on allergy and rhinology: Olfaction
    Zara M. Patel, Eric H. Holbrook, Justin H. Turner, Nithin D. Adappa, Mark W. Albers, Aytug Altundag, Simone Appenzeller, Richard M. Costanzo, Ilona Croy, Greg E. Davis, Puya Dehgani‐Mobaraki, Richard L. Doty, Valerie B. Duffy, Bradley J. Goldstein, David
    International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology.2022; 12(4): 327.     CrossRef
  • Does Olfactory Dysfunction Correlate with Disease Progression in Parkinson’s Disease? A Systematic Review of the Current Literature
    Tommaso Ercoli, Carla Masala, Gianluca Cadeddu, Marcello Mario Mascia, Gianni Orofino, Angelo Fabio Gigante, Paolo Solla, Giovanni Defazio, Lorenzo Rocchi
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(5): 513.     CrossRef
  • Olfactory dysfunction and striatal dopamine transporter binding in motor subtypes of Parkinson’s disease
    Fardin Nabizadeh, Fatemeh Sodeifian, Kasra Pirahesh
    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(8): 4745.     CrossRef
  • Olfaction and Executive Cognitive Performance: A Systematic Review
    Vasudeva Murthy Challakere Ramaswamy, Peter William Schofield
    Frontiers in Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nasal and Parotid Blood Pool Activity Is Significantly Correlated with Metabolic Syndrome Components and Sleep Apnea
    William T. Phillips, Nasser J. Issa, Shereef B. Elhalwagi, Hilda T. Draeger, Joyce G. Schwartz, Jonathan A. Gelfond
    Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.2022; 20(7): 395.     CrossRef
  • Chronic neuropsychiatric sequelae of SARS‐CoV‐2: Protocol and methods from the Alzheimer's Association Global Consortium
    Gabriel A. de Erausquin, Heather Snyder, Traolach S. Brugha, Sudha Seshadri, Maria Carrillo, Rajesh Sagar, Yueqin Huang, Charles Newton, Carmela Tartaglia, Charlotte Teunissen, Krister Håkanson, Rufus Akinyemi, Kameshwar Prasad, Giovanni D'Avossa, Gabriel
    Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Machine learning-based prediction of cognitive outcomes in de novo Parkinson’s disease
    Joshua Harvey, Rick A. Reijnders, Rachel Cavill, Annelien Duits, Sebastian Köhler, Lars Eijssen, Bart P. F. Rutten, Gemma Shireby, Ali Torkamani, Byron Creese, Albert F. G. Leentjens, Katie Lunnon, Ehsan Pishva
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Hyposmia in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Is Influenced by Constipation and Dysbiosis of Microbiota
    Chao Li, Ying Hou, Xu Wang, Yue-xuan Li, Feng Li, Chao Zhang, Wei-guo Li
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hyposmia may predict development of freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease
    Jae Jung Lee, Jin Yong Hong, Jong Sam Baik
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2021; 128(6): 763.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Dopamine Depletion Patterns in Hyposmia- and Dysautonomia-Dominant Parkinson’s Disease
    Han Soo Yoo, Sangwon Lee, Seong Ho Jeong, Byoung Seok Ye, Young H. Sohn, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2021; 11(4): 1703.     CrossRef
Brief communications
Risk Factors for Falls in Patients with de novo Parkinson’s Disease: A Focus on Motor and Non-Motor Symptoms
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Mina Lee, Hyunjin Ju, Kayeong Im
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):142-145.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20009
  • 3,944 View
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  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
We aimed to identify risk factors for falls in patients with de novo Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods Forty-six patients with de novo PD were retrospectively included in the study. We assessed details on the patients’ motor symptoms as well as non-motor symptoms using several representative scales for global cognition, depression, fatigue, and dysautonomia. Fallers and non-fallers were identified according to their history of falls during the preceding year. Results Twenty-two patients (45.8%) with de novo PD had a history of falls. Compared with the non-faller group, the faller group exhibited higher scores for postural instability/gait difficulty (PIGD), anxiety, fatigue, total dysautonomia, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and thermoregulatory dysfunction. Moreover, logistic regression analysis showed that falling was positively correlated with anxiety and gastrointestinal symptoms but negatively associated with the tremor scores. Conclusion Our findings suggest that falling in patients with de novo PD is significantly associated with PIGD/non-tremor symptoms, anxiety, and gastrointestinal dysfunction.

Citations

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  • Associations of cognitive dysfunction with motor and non-motor symptoms in patients with de novo Parkinson’s disease
    Kyum-Yil Kwon, Suyeon Park, Rae On Kim, Eun Ji Lee, Mina Lee
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of fall risk factors and non-motor symptoms in patients with early Parkinson’s disease
    Kyum-Yil Kwon, Suyeon Park, Eun Ji Lee, Mina Lee, Hyunjin Ju
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Understanding the influence of pain and fatigue on physical performance, fear of falling and falls in people with Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study
    Hanan Khalil, Nesreen Alissa, Alham Al-Sharman, Islam E’leimat, Majdi  Al Qawasmeh, Khalid El-Salem
    Neurodegenerative Disease Management.2021; 11(2): 113.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Risk Factors for Falls among Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Jacek Wilczyński, Magdalena Ścipniak, Kacper Ścipniak, Kamil Margiel, Igor Wilczyński, Rafał Zieliński, Piotr Sobolewski, Stefano Brunelli
    BioMed Research International.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
Sedentary Time is Associated with Worse Attention in Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Study
Sara B. W. Troutman, Kirk I. Erickson, George Grove, Andrea M. Weinstein
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):146-149.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20015
  • 6,228 View
  • 108 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Cognitive symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) may be alleviated by moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), but no published research has characterized the relationship between objectively measured sedentary behavior and cognitive symptoms of PD. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the cross-sectional relationship between sedentary time and cognitive performance in a small pilot sample of individuals with mild-to-moderate PD. Methods Objective measures of sedentary time were obtained using an armband accelerometer. Cognition was assessed with the Parkinson’s Disease Cognitive Rating Scale and a computerized task-switching paradigm. Results The percentage of awake time spent in sedentary activities was negatively correlated with attention (β = -14.20, t(12) = -2.47, p = 0.03) but not other cognitive domains (p > 0.05) after controlling for MVPA and medication dosage. Conclusion Sedentary activity may have unique associations with cognition, particularly attention, over and above MVPA in individuals with PD.
Case Reports
Dopa-Responsive Dystonia: A Male Patient Inherited a Novel GCH1 Deletion from an Asymptomatic Mother
Wendi Wang, Baozhong Xin, Heng Wang
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):150-153.   Published online March 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19069
  • 4,361 View
  • 127 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) is a complex genetic disorder with either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive inheritance, with autosomal dominant being more frequent. Autosomal dominant DRD is known to be caused by mutations in the GCH1 gene, with incomplete penetrance frequently reported, particularly in males. Here, we report a male patient with DRD caused by exon 1 deletion in the GCH1 gene inherited from the asymptomatic mother. The patient had an atypical presentation, notably with no dystonia, and underwent extensive workup for a myriad of neuromuscular disorders before a low-dose L-dopa trial and confirmatory genetic testing were performed. Our experience with this family highlights an atypical presentation of DRD and prompts us to consider the genetic complexity of DRD.
Successful Pallidal Stimulation in a Patient with KMT2B-Related Dystonia
Jun Kyu Mun, Ah Reum Kim, Jong Hyeon Ahn, Minkyeong Kim, Jin Whan Cho, Jung-Il Lee, Kyung Rae Cho, Jinyoung Youn
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):154-158.   Published online April 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19087
  • 5,111 View
  • 154 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Although the KMT2B gene was identified as a causative gene for early-onset generalized dystonia, the efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in KMT2B-related dystonia has not been clearly elucidated. Here, we describe a 28-year-old woman who developed generalized dystonia with developmental delay, microcephaly, short stature, and cognitive decline. She was diagnosed with KMT2B- related dystonia using whole-exome sequencing with a heterozygous frameshift insertion of c.515dupC (p.T172fs) in the KMT2B gene. Oral medications and botulinum toxin injection were not effective. The dystonia markedly improved with bilateral pallidal DBS (the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale score was reduced from 30 to 5 on the dystonia movement scale and from 11 to 1 on the disability scale), and she could walk independently. From this case, we suggest that bilateral globus pallidus internus DBS can be an effective treatment option for patients with KMT2B-related generalized dystonia.

Citations

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  • GPi‐DBS for KMT2B ‐Associated Dystonia: Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis
    Roopa Rajan, Kanwaljeet Garg, Arti Saini, Divya M. Radhakrishnan, Miryam Carecchio, Binukumar BK, Manmohan Singh, Achal K. Srivastava
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2022; 9(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Dystonic Tremor in Adult-onset DYT-KMT2B
    Rui Shimazaki, Jun Ikezawa, Ryoichi Okiyama, Kenko Azuma, Hiroyuki Akagawa, Kazushi Takahashi
    Internal Medicine.2022; 61(15): 2357.     CrossRef
  • Identification of a novel de novo KMT2B variant in a Greek dystonia patient via exome sequencing genotype–phenotype correlations of all published cases
    Chrysoula Marogianni, Despoina Georgouli, Katerina Dadouli, Panagiotis Ntellas, Dimitrios Rikos, Georgios M. Hadjigeorgiou, Cleanthi Spanaki, Georgia Xiromerisiou
    Molecular Biology Reports.2021; 48(1): 371.     CrossRef
  • Arching deep brain stimulation in dystonia types
    Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2021; 128(4): 539.     CrossRef
  • Deep Brain Stimulation for Pediatric Dystonia
    Travis Larsh, Steve W. Wu, Sudhakar Vadivelu, Gerald A. Grant, Jennifer A. O'Malley
    Seminars in Pediatric Neurology.2021; 38: 100896.     CrossRef
  • Deep Brain Stimulation in KMT2B-Related Dystonia: Case Report and Review of the Literature With Special Emphasis on Dysarthria and Speech
    Maria Abel, Robert Pfister, Iman Hussein, Fahd Alsalloum, Christina Onyinzo, Simon Kappl, Michael Zech, Walter Demmel, Martin Staudt, Manfred Kudernatsch, Steffen Berweck
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Radiofrequency ablation for DYT‐28 dystonia: short term follow‐up of three adult cases
    Shiro Horisawa, Kenkou Azuma, Hiroyuki Akagawa, Taku Nonaka, Takakazu Kawamata, Takaomi Taira
    Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology.2020; 7(10): 2047.     CrossRef
  • KMT2B-related disorders: expansion of the phenotypic spectrum and long-term efficacy of deep brain stimulation
    Laura Cif, Diane Demailly, Jean-Pierre Lin, Katy E Barwick, Mario Sa, Lucia Abela, Sony Malhotra, Wui K Chong, Dora Steel, Alba Sanchis-Juan, Adeline Ngoh, Natalie Trump, Esther Meyer, Xavier Vasques, Julia Rankin, Meredith W Allain, Carolyn D Applegate,
    Brain.2020; 143(11): 3242.     CrossRef
Treatment of Acute Delirium in a Patient with Parkinson’s Disease by Transfer to the Intensive Care Unit and Administration of Dexmedetomidine
Morgan Lombardo, Amanda DiPiazza, Kelly Rippey, Naomi Lubarr, Elana Clar, Hooman Azmi
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):159-162.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20005
  • 5,212 View
  • 128 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The treatment of delirium or psychosis in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be complicated by the limited number of pharmacological agents that can be used in this population. Typical and atypical antipsychotics are contraindicated, as they can worsen motor symptoms. The treatment of acute delirium is even more complicated in the hospital setting, as many medications deemed safer in this population are only available in oral form. We present a case of acute delirium in a patient with PD, likely precipitated by a polypharmacy interaction of new medications, that was successfully managed by transferring the patient to the intensive care unit and administering dexmedetomidine for 72 hours.

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    Dexiang Wang, Ruowen Li, Shu Li, Juan Wang, Min Zeng, Jia Dong, Xiaoyuan Liu, Nan Lin, Yuming Peng
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Letters to the editor
A Rare Case of Late Adult-Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C
Ryul Kim, Dallah Yoo, Sangmin Park, Jung Hwan Shin, Ji-Hyun Choi, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):163-165.   Published online March 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19077
  • 4,927 View
  • 168 Download
  • 2 Citations
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  • Genetic and phenotypic variability in adult patients with Niemann Pick type C from Serbia: single-center experience
    Nikola Kresojević, Valerija Dobričić, Milica Ječmenica Lukić, Aleksandra Tomić, Igor Petrović, Nataša Dragašević, Ivana Perović, Ana Marjanović, Marija Branković, Milena Janković, Ivana Novaković, Marina Svetel, Vladimir S. Kostić
    Journal of Neurology.2022; 269(6): 3167.     CrossRef
  • Two Patients with Niemann Pick Disease Type C Diagnosed in the Seventh Decade of Life
    Melanie Wu, Rita Ceponiene, Ece Bayram, Irene Litvan
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2020; 7(8): 961.     CrossRef
The Utility of Serial Cerebrospinal Fluid Removal in Elderly Patients with Idiopathic Normal-Pressure Hydrocephalus?
Halil Onder, Guven Arslan
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):166-167.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20012
  • 3,498 View
  • 58 Download
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Focal Muscle Spasms after Thoracic Spine Surgery for Schwannoma: The Twitching Scar
Paulo Eduardo Mestrinelli Carrilho, Marcius Benigno Marques dos Santos
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):168-170.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20017
  • 3,827 View
  • 184 Download
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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders