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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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Volume 3(1); April 2010
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Review Articles
Human Genetic Variation and Parkinson’s Disease
Sun Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):1-5.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10001
  • 22,355 View
  • 45 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with multifactorial etiology. In the past decade, the genetic causes of monogenic forms of familial PD have been defined. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic PD cases that occur in outbred populations have yet to be clarified. The recent development of resources such as the International HapMap Project and technological advances in high-throughput genotyping have provided new basis for genetic association studies of common complex diseases, including PD. A new generation of genome-wide association studies will soon offer a potentially powerful approach for mapping causal genes and will likely change treatment and alter our perception of the genetic determinants of PD. However, the execution and analysis of such studies will require great care.

Comparing Cerebral White Matter Lesion Burdens between Parkinson’s Disease with and without Dementia
Sun-Ah Choi, Virgilio Gerald H. Evidente, John N Caviness
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):6-10.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10002
  • 17,507 View
  • 68 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Cerebral white matter lesions (CWMLs) have been suggested to be associated with an increased risk of dementia, disability, and death. CWMLs are more common in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) than in normal elderly individuals of comparable age. Only a few studies have been done to determine whether CWMLs may influence cognitive decline in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Fully developed PD with concurrent AD was reported to likely cause impaired cognition in spite of accumulating evidence suggesting that PD with dementia (PDD) is more closely associated with Lewy body (LB) pathology. Currently, contradictory data on the neuropathology of dementia in PD require further prospective clinicopathological studies in larger cohorts to elucidate the impact of AD and α-synuclein (SCNA) pathologies on the cognitive status in these disorders. Previous reports did not suggest CWMLs to be associated with an increased risk of PDD. After adjusting for age at death, age at onset of PD, and duration of PD, our recent study investigating CWMLs in PDD via autopsy has shown a positive correlation between the burden of CWMLs and PDD. The frequent co-existence of both LB and AD lesions suggests that both pathologies independently or synergistically contribute to both movement disorders and cognitive impairment. The individual and cumulative burden of CWMLs, LB lesions, and AD lesions may synergistically contribute to cognitive decline in LB disorders such as PDD.

Citations

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  • Cx43 Mediates Resistance against MPP+-Induced Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells via Modulating the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway
    In-Su Kim, Palanivel Ganesan, Dong-Kug Choi
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2016; 17(11): 1819.     CrossRef
  • Gray and White Matter Contributions to Cognitive Frontostriatal Deficits in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease
    Catherine C. Price, Jared Tanner, Peter T. Nguyen, Nadine A. Schwab, Sandra Mitchell, Elizabeth Slonena, Babette Brumback, Michael S. Okun, Thomas H. Mareci, Dawn Bowers, Stephen D Ginsberg
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(1): e0147332.     CrossRef
  • White Matter Hypoperfusion and Damage in Dementia: Post-Mortem Assessment
    Seth Love, J Scott Miners
    Brain Pathology.2015; 25(1): 99.     CrossRef
Clinicopathological Correlates of Lewy Body Disease: Fundamental Issues
Tae-Beom Ahn
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):11-14.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10003
  • 9,488 View
  • 62 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Lewy body pathology (LBP) is the pathological hallmark of Lewy body diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. Recent studies have shed new light on the role of LBP, the interactions of LBP with concomitant pathologies, and the propagation of LBP from the olfactory bulb and enteric nervous system to the central nervous system. The intrinsic difficulty with identifying clinicopathological correlates could be overcome by improving our understanding of the pathological evolution of LBP.

Citations

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  • Demencias degenerativas: ¿un dilema de síndromes o de enfermedades?
    A. Robles Bayón
    Neurología.2022; 37(6): 480.     CrossRef
  • Degenerative dementias: a question of syndrome or disease?
    A. Robles Bayón
    Neurología (English Edition).2022; 37(6): 480.     CrossRef
Original Article
Psychogenic Gait Disorders after Mass School Vaccination of Influenza A
Jung Ho Ryu, Jong Sam Baik
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):15-17.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10004
  • 6,642 View
  • 32 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose

Psychogenic movement disorders (PMD) after war or mass vaccination was reported and well known disease entity already. However, we have seldom been met those patients because we don’t have any chance to experience of those events. Recently, influenza A (H1N1) spreads around world, and many countries have a program of mass vaccination of H1N1. Although PMD in adult is well characterized, childhood-onset PMD has not been extensively studied.

Case Reports

We present four children of psychogenic gait disorders (PGDs) after mass school vaccination of H1N1. They had fluctuating weakness and their prognosis was good. We confirmed all patients as PGD by placebo.

Conclusions

Our four cases have two common characteristics. One is that all were young and their prognosis was good. And the other is that all were induced their abnormal gait symptoms after mass school vaccination. We observed that mass PMD has a different characteristics comparing to personal PMD, and PMD in children is differ from adult onset PMD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Diagnosing Common Movement Disorders in Children
    Jennifer A. O’Malley
    CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology.2022; 28(5): 1476.     CrossRef
  • Immunization stress-related responses: Implications for vaccination hesitancy and vaccination processes during the COVID-19 pandemic
    Steven Taylor, Gordon J.G. Asmundson
    Journal of Anxiety Disorders.2021; 84: 102489.     CrossRef
  • Functional Neurological Disorder after Vaccination: A Balanced Approach Informed by History
    Stefanie C Linden, Alan J Carson, Simon Wessely
    Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.2021; 51(4): 330.     CrossRef
  • Psychogenic Gait Disorder Complicating Recovery after Concussion: A Case Series
    Scott I. Otallah
    Pediatric Neurology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Psychogenic movement disorders in children and adolescents: an update
    Susan R. Harris
    European Journal of Pediatrics.2019; 178(4): 581.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Action Tremor Associated with Lamotrigine Monotherapy
Ji-Hye Yang, Sung-Woo Chung, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):18-19.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10005
  • 7,152 View
  • 47 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Lamotrigine (LTG) is associated with a tremor when given in combination with valproic acid; however, a tremor associated with lamotrigine monotherapy is rare. Here, we report a case of positional and action tremor associated with lamotrigine use. Based on the temporal relationship, it is conceivable that lamotrigine increases serotonin transmission or affects basal ganglia dopamine activity, thereby causing the tremor.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Drug-induced tremor
    T. M. Ostroumova, V. A. Tolmacheva, O. D. Ostroumova
    Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Psychosomatics.2022; 14(2): 4.     CrossRef
  • Movement disorders associated with antiseizure medications: A systematic review
    Daniel J. Zhou, Spriha Pavuluri, Isha Snehal, Cynthia M. Schmidt, Miguel Situ-Kcomt, Olga Taraschenko
    Epilepsy & Behavior.2022; 131: 108693.     CrossRef
  • Antiseizure Drugs and Movement Disorders
    Michel Sáenz-Farret, Marina A. J. Tijssen, Dawn Eliashiv, Robert S. Fisher, Kapil Sethi, Alfonso Fasano
    CNS Drugs.2022; 36(8): 859.     CrossRef
  • Akinetisch-rigide Bewegungsstörungen unter Antikonvulsiva
    K. Kohlhase, S. Knake, L. Timmermann, F. Rosenow, A. Strzelczyk
    DGNeurologie.2019; 2(4): 287.     CrossRef
  • An Unusual Etiology of Vocal Tremor in a Professional Singer
    Bridget L. Hopewell, Cristen Paige, David O. Francis
    Journal of Voice.2019; 33(5): 730.     CrossRef
Hemichorea-Hemiballism with a Diabetic Patient
Yoo Hwan Kim, Ju Yeon Kim, Hung Youl Seok, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):20-21.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10006
  • 9,391 View
  • 55 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Chorea and ballism are movement disorders that result from a variety of conditions. They are an uncommon manifestation of diabetes mellitus. We report a 52-year-old diabetic man who presented with acute onset chorea-ballism with a putaminal high-signal-intensity lesion on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • “Diabetic striatopathy”: clinical presentations, controversy, pathogenesis, treatments, and outcomes
    Choon-Bing Chua, Cheuk-Kwan Sun, Chih-Wei Hsu, Yi-Cheng Tai, Chih-Yu Liang, I-Ting Tsai
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • NEUROLOGINĖ PATOLOGIJA SERGANT 2 TIPO CUKRINIU DIABETU
    Liudmila Kimševaitė
    Medicinos teorija ir praktika.2017; 22(4): 328.     CrossRef
Restlessness with Manic Episodes due to Right Parietal Infarction
Suk Yun Kang, Jong Won Paik, Young Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):22-24.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10007
  • 13,003 View
  • 80 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Mood disorders following acute stroke are relatively common. However, restlessness with manic episodes has rarely been reported. Lesions responsible for post-stroke mania can be located in the thalamus, caudate nucleus, and temporal and frontal lobes. We present a patient who exhibited restlessness with manic episodes after an acute infarction in the right parietal lobe, and summarize the case reports involving post-stroke mania. The right parietal stroke causing mania in our case is a novel observation that may help us to understand the mechanisms underlying restlessness with mania following acute stroke.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Management of psychiatric disorders in patients with stroke and traumatic brain injury
    Gautam Saha, Kaustav Chakraborty, Amrit Pattojoshi
    Indian Journal of Psychiatry.2022; 64(8): 344.     CrossRef
  • Post stroke delirium
    M. A. Savina
    Zhurnal nevrologii i psikhiatrii im. S.S. Korsakova.2014; 114(12. Vyp. 2): 19.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders