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Volume 7(1); April 2014
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Review Article
Cell Therapy Strategies vs. Paracrine Effect in Huntington’s Disease
Wooseok Im, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):1-6.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14001
  • 12,836 View
  • 86 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder. The most common symptom of HD is abnormal involuntary writhing movements, called chorea. Antipsychotics and tetrabenazine are used to alleviate the signs and symptoms of HD. Stem cells have been investigated for use in neurodegenerative disorders to develop cell therapy strategies. Recent evidence indicates that the beneficial effects of stem cell therapies are actually mediated by secretory molecules, as well as cell replacement. Although stem cell studies show that cell transplantation provides cellular improvement around lesions in in vivo models, further work is required to elucidate some issues before the clinical application of stem cells. These issues include the precise mechanism of action, delivery method, toxicity and safety. With a focus on HD, this review summarizes cell therapy strategies and the paracrine effect of stem cells.

Citations

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  • Current Understanding of Stem Cell and Secretome Therapies in Liver Diseases
    Dongkyu Kim, Gun-Sik Cho, Choongseong Han, Dong-Hyuk Park, Hee-Kyung Park, Dong-Hun Woo, Jong-Hoon Kim
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  • Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Huntington’s Disease: Disease Modeling and the Potential for Cell-Based Therapy
    Ling Liu, Jin-Sha Huang, Chao Han, Guo-Xin Zhang, Xiao-Yun Xu, Yan Shen, Jie Li, Hai-Yang Jiang, Zhi-Cheng Lin, Nian Xiong, Tao Wang
    Molecular Neurobiology.2016; 53(10): 6698.     CrossRef
  • Stem Cells in Neurological Disorders: Emerging Therapy with Stunning Hopes
    Ghanshyam Upadhyay, Sharmila Shankar, Rakesh K. Srivastava
    Molecular Neurobiology.2015; 52(1): 610.     CrossRef
  • Genome Modification Leads to Phenotype Reversal in Human Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cells
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    Stem Cells.2015; 33(6): 1829.     CrossRef
  • Glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition enhanced proliferation, migration and functional re-endothelialization of endothelial progenitor cells in hypercholesterolemia microenvironment
    Bin Cui, Jun Jin, Xiaohan Ding, Mengyang Deng, Shiyong Yu, MingBao Song, Yang Yu, Xiaohui Zhao, Jianfei Chen, Lan Huang
    Experimental Biology and Medicine.2015; 240(12): 1752.     CrossRef
Original Articles
The Frequency and Severity of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease
Hye-Young Sung, Jeong-Wook Park, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):7-12.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14002
  • 16,116 View
  • 160 Download
  • 42 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective: Although gastrointestinal dysfunctions occur in the majority of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), they are often unrecognized because many patients remain relatively asymptomatic in the early stage. We investigated the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD using newly developed gastrointestinal symptom questionnaires.
Methods: Early PD patients with a symptom duration not exceeding 3 years were included in this study. All PD patients were evaluated using a questionnaire, which consisted of three relevant domains: oropharyngoesophageal (10 items); gastric (3 items); and intestinal-anorectal (7 items). The frequency of symptoms was calculated as a proportion with an item score ≥ 2.
Results: Of the 54 patients enrolled, 48 patients (88.9%) responded that bowel symptoms developed before the onset of Parkinsonian motor symptoms, and four patients reported that the onset of two types of symptoms (i.e., bowel and neurological) occurred approximately simultaneously, with only months between them. The frequencies of gastrointestinal symptoms are as follows: speech disturbance (40.7%), drooling (24.1%), sense of getting stuck (31.5%), choking (27.8%), globus pharyngis (16.7%), repetitive deglutition (29.6%), pain during swallowing (5.6%), food regurgitation (3.7%), acid reflux (7.4%), nausea/ vomiting (11.1%), early satiety (16.7%), postprandial fullness (14.8%), epigastric soreness (9.3%), abdominal pain (3.7%), constipation (46.3%), excessive strain during defecation (33.3%), fecal incontinence (7.4%), tenesmus (20.4%), loose stool or diarrhea (3.7%), and difficulty in relaxing anal sphincter (11.1%). Two patients were scored at zero.
Conclusions: Our findings confirm that gastrointestinal dysfunction occurs in early PD in relatively high frequency.

Citations

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    Aging and disease.2022; 13(5): 1381.     CrossRef
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    Bai-Hua Sun, Tao Wang, Nian-Ying Li, Qiong Wu, Jin Qiao
    World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics.2021; 12(1): 21.     CrossRef
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    Jade E. Kenna, Megan C. Bakeberg, Anastazja M. Gorecki, Alfred Chin Yen Tay, Samantha Winter, Frank L. Mastaglia, Ryan S. Anderton
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2021; 8(2): 245.     CrossRef
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    Behavioural Pharmacology.2021; 32(1): 43.     CrossRef
  • Deglutition Impairment during Dual Task in Parkinson Disease Is Associated with Cognitive Status
    Luciana Grolli Ardenghi, Alana Verza Signorini, Gerson Schulz Maahs, Fabio Selaimen, Konrado Massing Deutsch, Silvia Dornelles, Carlos Roberto de Mello Rieder
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    Gregory D. Scott, Miranda M. Lim, Matthew G. Drake, Randy Woltjer, Joseph F. Quinn
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(9): 2094.     CrossRef
  • The Gastrointestinal Dysfunction Scale for Parkinson's Disease
    Marta Camacho, Julia C. Greenland, Caroline H. Williams‐Gray
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(10): 2358.     CrossRef
  • The role of microbiota-gut-brain axis in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders
    Katarzyna Socała, Urszula Doboszewska, Aleksandra Szopa, Anna Serefko, Marcin Włodarczyk, Anna Zielińska, Ewa Poleszak, Jakub Fichna, Piotr Wlaź
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  • Neuro-Immunity and Gut Dysbiosis Drive Parkinson’s Disease-Induced Pain
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    Frontiers in Immunology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease: Implications for pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment
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    Neurobiology of Disease.2020; 134: 104700.     CrossRef
  • Double‐Blind , Randomized, Placebo‐Controlled Trial of DA ‐9701 in Parkinson's Disease: PASS ‐ GI Study
    Ji‐Hyun Choi, Jee‐Young Lee, Jin Whan Cho, Seong‐Beom Koh, Young Soon Yang, Dalla Yoo, Cheol‐Min Shin, Hee Tae Kim
    Movement Disorders.2020; 35(11): 1966.     CrossRef
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    R. Alberto Travagli, Kirsteen N. Browning, Michael Camilleri
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology.2020; 17(11): 673.     CrossRef
  • Expanding the brain researcher's toolkit
    Viviana Gradinaru
    Science.2020; 369(6504): 637.     CrossRef
  • Excessive buccal saliva in patients with Parkinson’s disease of the French COPARK cohort
    Olivier Rascol, Laurence Negre-Pages, Philippe Damier, Arnaud Delval, Pascal Derkinderen, Alain Destée, Margherita Fabbri, Wassilios G. Meissner, Amine Rachdi, François Tison, Santiago Perez-Lloret
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  • Struktur und Efferenzen der Substantia nigra pars compacta beim idiopathischen Parkinson-Syndrom
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    Fortschritte der Neurologie · Psychiatrie.2020; 88(09): 591.     CrossRef
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    American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.2020; 319(5): G529.     CrossRef
  • Does Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Modify Ano-Rectal Motility in Parkinson’s Disease? Results of a Randomized Cross-Over Study
    Guillaume Gourcerol, David Maltete, Nathalie Chastan, Marie Laure Welter, Anne Marie Leroi, Stéphane Derrey
    Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface.2019; 22(4): 478.     CrossRef
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    Gazerani
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2019; 20(17): 4121.     CrossRef
  • Colon dysregulation in methamphetamine self-administering HIV-1 transgenic rats
    Amanda L. Persons, Brinda D. Bradaric, Hemraj B. Dodiya, Michael Ohene-Nyako, Christopher B. Forsyth, Ali Keshavarzian, Maliha Shaikh, T. Celeste Napier, Shilpa J. Buch
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  • Induction of alpha-synuclein pathology in the enteric nervous system of the rat and non-human primate results in gastrointestinal dysmotility and transient CNS pathology
    Fredric P. Manfredsson, Kelvin C. Luk, Matthew J. Benskey, Aysegul Gezer, Joanna Garcia, Nathan C. Kuhn, Ivette M. Sandoval, Joseph R. Patterson, Alana O'Mara, Reid Yonkers, Jeffrey H. Kordower
    Neurobiology of Disease.2018; 112: 106.     CrossRef
  • Dysbiosis of gut microbiota and microbial metabolites in Parkinson’s Disease
    Meng-Fei Sun, Yan-Qin Shen
    Ageing Research Reviews.2018; 45: 53.     CrossRef
  • Parkinson’s Disease and Current Treatments for Its Gastrointestinal Neurogastromotility Effects
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  • Validation of the Korean Version of the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease-Autonomic
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    Syed Ali, Ning Yin, Arkam Rehman, Verline Justilien
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Correlation of Sleep Disturbance and Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Eun Ja Kim, Joon Hyun Baek, Dong Jin Shin, Hyeon-Mi Park, Yeong-Bae Lee, Kee-Hyung Park, Dong Hoon Shin, Young Noh, Young Hee Sung
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):13-18.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14003
  • 11,845 View
  • 105 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective: Cognitive impairment is a common nonmotor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and is associated with high mortality, caregiver distress, and nursing home placement. The risk factors for cognitive decline in PD patients include advanced age, longer disease duration, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, hallucinations, excessive daytime sleepiness, and nontremor symptoms including bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, and gait disturbance. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine which types of sleep disturbances are related to cognitive function in PD patients.
Methods: A total of 71 PD patients (29 males, mean age 66.46 ± 8.87 years) were recruited. All patients underwent the Mini- Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Korean Version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessments (MoCA-K) to assess global cognitive function. Sleep disorders were evaluated with the Stanford Sleepiness Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, and Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale in Korea (PDSS).
Results: The ISI was correlated with the MMSE, and total PDSS scores were correlated with the MMSE and the MoCA-K. In each item of the PDSS, nocturnal restlessness, vivid dreams, hallucinations, and nocturnal motor symptoms were positively correlated with the MMSE, and nocturnal restlessness and vivid dreams were significantly related to the MoCA-K. Vivid dreams and nocturnal restlessness are considered the most powerful correlation factors with global cognitive function, because they commonly had significant correlation to cognition assessed with both the MMSE and the MoCA-K.

Conclusions: We found a correlation between global cognitive function and sleep disturbances, including vivid dreams and nocturnal restlessness, in PD patients.

Citations

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    Pantelis Stathis, George Papadopoulos
    Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Abidemi I. Otaiku
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2021; 8(7): 1041.     CrossRef
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    Nikita Aggarwal, Barjinder Singh Saini, Savita Gupta
    The Egyptian Journal of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Case Reports
Stiff-Person Syndrome: Case Series
Yu Jin Jung, Han G. Jeong, Ryul Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):19-21.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14004
  • 12,289 View
  • 1,362 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare disorder, characterized by progressive fluctuating muscular rigidity and spasms. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody is primarily involved in the pathogenesis of SPS and SPS is strongly associated with other autoimmune disease. Here we report three cases of patients with classical SPS finally confirmed by high serum level of GAD antibodies. All of our patients respond favorably to gamma amino butyric acid-enhancing drugs and immunotherapies.

Citations

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Giant Middle Fossa Epidermoid Presenting as Holmes’ Tremor Syndrome
Bindu Menon, P Sasikala, Amit Agrawal
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):22-24.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14005
  • 8,719 View
  • 64 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Intracranial dermoids may gradually reach an enormous size before the onset of symptoms. Common clinical presentations of intracranial epidermoid include headache and seizures. We present a case of a 35-year female patient with giant middle fossa epidermoid that presented with Holmes’ tremor syndrome, and we review the relevant literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a presentation has not previously been described in the literature.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Gabriela B. Raina, Maria G. Cersosimo, Silvia S. Folgar, Juan C. Giugni, Cristian Calandra, Juan P. Paviolo, Veronica A. Tkachuk, Carlos Zuñiga Ramirez, Andrea L. Tschopp, Daniela S. Calvo, Luis A. Pellene, Marcela C. Uribe Roca, Miriam Velez, Rolando J.
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Rhabdomyolysis Related to Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease
Hesna Bekta, Orhan Deniz, adiye Temel, Hava Dnmez Keklikolu, ener Akyol
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):25-27.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14006
  • 18,614 View
  • 80 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Rhabdomyolysis is a life threatening syndrome. It accounts for an estimated 8% to 15% of cases of acute renal failure and is associated with a mortality rate of 5%. In movement disorders, various causes of rhabdomyolysis have been reported including status dystonicus, myoclonus, generalized chorea and parkinsonism-hyperprexia syndrome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Levodopa-induced dyskinesia leading to rhabdomyolysis is a very rare phenomenon in PD. We report a case of 76 years old PD patient with dyskinesia and rhabdomyolysis.

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    Ka Loong Kelvin Au, Shannon Chiu, Irene A Malaty
    BMJ Case Reports.2021; 14(3): e239874.     CrossRef
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Suppression of Myoclonus in Corticobasal Degeneration by Levetiracetam
Jae Wook Cho, Jae Hyeok Lee
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):28-30.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14007
  • 9,058 View
  • 95 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Myoclonus in corticobasal degeneration (CBD) has often been associated with severe and difficult to treat disabilities. Levetiracetam is a new antiepileptic agent with antimyoclonic effects. Herein, we present a 72-year-old woman with clinically probable CBD and with spontaneous rhythmic myoclonus in the right foot, which was markedly ameliorated through treatment with levetiracetam. The effect of levetiracetam was associated with the decreased amplitude of enlarged cortical somatosensory evoked potentials. This result suggests that the antimyoclonic effect of levetiracetam might be mediated through the suppression of increased cortical excitability.

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    Davide Vito Moretti
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    Christine M. Stahl, Steven J. Frucht
    Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.2019; 19(4): 325.     CrossRef
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    F. Ali, K. A. Josephs
    Journal of Neurology.2018; 265(2): 439.     CrossRef
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    Carmen Gasca-Salas, Anthony E. Lang
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2016; 3(4): 417.     CrossRef
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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders