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Original Article
Nationwide Survey of Patient Knowledge and Attitudes towards Human Experimentation Using Stem Cells or Bee Venom Acupuncture for Parkinson’s Disease
Sun Ju Chung, Seong Beom Koh, Young-Su Ju, Jae Woo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(2):84-91.   Published online October 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14012
  • 16,850 View
  • 87 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective Stem cell treatment is a well-recognized experimental treatment among patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), for which there are high expectations of a positive impact. Acupuncture with bee venom is one of the most popular complementary and alternative treatments for PD. Patient knowledge and attitudes towards these experimental treatments are unknown.
Methods Using a 12-item questionnaire, a nationwide survey was conducted of 963 PD patients and 267 caregivers in 44 Korean Movement Disorders Society member hospitals from April 2013 to June 2013. The survey was performed by trained interviewers using conventional methods.
Results Regarding questions on experimental treatments using stem cells or bee venom acupuncture, 5.1–17.7% of PD patients answered questions on safety, efficacy, and evidence-based practice incorrectly; however, more than half responded that they did not know the correct answer. Although safety and efficacy have not been established, 55.5% of PD patients responded that they were willing to receive stem cell treatment. With regard to participating in experimental treatments, there was a strong correlation between stem cell treatment and bee venom acupuncture (p < 0.0001, odds ratio = 5.226, 95% confidence interval 3.919–6.969). Younger age, higher education, and a longer duration of PD were all associated with a correct understanding of experimental treatments.
Conclusions Our data suggest that relatively few PD patients correctly understand the safety and efficacy of experimental treatments and that PD patients are greatly interested in new treatments. We hope that our data will be used to educate or to plan educational programs for PD patients and caregivers.

Citations

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  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Bee Venom Acupuncture Therapy on Rheumatoid Arthritis Among Patients in Saudi Arabia
    Shahd E Sharaf, Safaa Alsanosi, Abdullah R Alzahrani, Saeed S Al-Ghamdi, Sharaf E Sharaf, Nahla Ayoub
    International Journal of General Medicine.2022; Volume 15: 1171.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Patient and Expert Perceptions of the Attainment of Research Milestones in Parkinson's Disease
    Patrick Bodilly Kane, Daniel M. Benjamin, Roger A. Barker, Anthony E. Lang, Todd Sherer, Jonathan Kimmelman
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(1): 171.     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of patient and public perspectives on cell and gene therapies
    Karen Macpherson, Olalekan Lee Aiyegbusi, Lauren Elston, Susan Myles, Jennifer Washington, Nisha Sungum, Mark Briggs, Philip Newsome, Melanie Calvert
    Regenerative Medicine.2021; 16(11): 1005.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Applications of Bee Venom Acupoint Injection
    Ting-Yen Lin, Ching-Liang Hsieh
    Toxins.2020; 12(10): 618.     CrossRef
  • Patient and public perspectives on cell and gene therapies: a systematic review
    Olalekan Lee Aiyegbusi, Karen Macpherson, Lauren Elston, Susan Myles, Jennifer Washington, Nisha Sungum, Mark Briggs, Philip N. Newsome, Melanie J. Calvert
    Nature Communications.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of Parkinson's disease: A cross-sectional survey of Asian patients
    Onanong Jitkritsadakul, Nonglak Boonrod, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2017; 374: 69.     CrossRef
  • Attitudes to Stem Cell Therapy Among Ischemic Stroke Survivors in the Lund Stroke Recovery Study
    Joseph Aked, Hossein Delavaran, Olle Lindvall, Bo Norrving, Zaal Kokaia, Arne Lindgren
    Stem Cells and Development.2017; 26(8): 566.     CrossRef
  • Professional ethics in complementary and alternative medicines in management of Parkinson’s disease
    Hee Jin Kim, Beomseok Jeon, Sun Ju Chung
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2016; 6(4): 675.     CrossRef
Review Article
Genetics of Parkinson’s Disease - A Clinical Perspective
Sang-Myung Cheon, Lilian Chan, Daniel Kam Yin Chan, Jae Woo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2012;5(2):33-41.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.12009
  • 26,763 View
  • 97 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Discovering genes following Medelian inheritance, such as autosomal dominant-synuclein and leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene, or autosomal recessive Parkin, P-TEN-induced putative kinase 1 gene and Daisuke-Junko 1 gene, has provided great insights into the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Genes found to be associated with PD through investigating genetic polymorphisms or via the whole genome association studies suggest that such genes could also contribute to an increased risk of PD in the general population. Some environmental factors have been found to be associated with genetic factors in at-risk patients, further implicating the role of gene-environment interactions in sporadic PD. There may be confusion for clinicians facing rapid progresses of genetic understanding in PD. After a brief review of PD genetics, we will discuss the insight of new genetic discoveries to clinicians, the implications of ethnic differences in PD genetics and the role of genetic testing for general clinicians managing PD patients.

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  • Exploring the complexities of 1C metabolism: implications in aging and neurodegenerative diseases
    Ayman Bou Ghanem, Yaman Hussayni, Raghid Kadbey, Yara Ratel, Shereen Yehya, Lara Khouzami, Hilda E. Ghadieh, Amjad Kanaan, Sami Azar, Frederic Harb
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dual-probe sandwich for Lewy body detection on nano-composite modified dielectric surface to determine Parkinson's disease
    Xi Zhang, Menghai Wu, Subash C.B. Gopinath, Yeng Chen
    Sensing and Bio-Sensing Research.2023; 42: 100599.     CrossRef
  • Neuroprotective effect of YIAEDAER peptide against Parkinson’s disease like pathology in zebrafish
    Qingyu Ren, Xin Jiang, Shanshan Zhang, Xin Gao, Yam Nath Paudel, Pengyu Zhang, Rongchun Wang, Kechun Liu, Meng Jin
    Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy.2022; 147: 112629.     CrossRef
  • Co-treatment with natural HMGB1 inhibitor Glycyrrhizin exerts neuroprotection and reverses Parkinson’s disease like pathology in Zebrafish
    Qingyu Ren, Xin Jiang, Yam Nath Paudel, Xin Gao, Daili Gao, Pengyu Zhang, Wenlong Sheng, Xueliang Shang, Kechun Liu, Xiujun Zhang, Meng Jin
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology.2022; 292: 115234.     CrossRef
  • The Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid EPA, but Not DHA, Enhances Neurotrophic Factor Expression through Epigenetic Mechanisms and Protects against Parkinsonian Neuronal Cell Death
    Maria Rachele Ceccarini, Veronica Ceccarelli, Michela Codini, Katia Fettucciari, Mario Calvitti, Samuela Cataldi, Elisabetta Albi, Alba Vecchini, Tommaso Beccari
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(24): 16176.     CrossRef
  • Comprehensive methylation profile of CSF cfDNA revealed pathogenesis and diagnostic markers for early-onset Parkinson's disease
    Jie Meng, Fenglin Wang, Lei Ji, Yuhua Liang, Wei Nian, Lele Song, Aiqin Zhu
    Epigenomics.2021; 13(20): 1637.     CrossRef
  • Early Expression of Neuronal Dopaminergic Markers in a Parkinson’s Disease Model in Rats Implanted with Enteric Stem Cells (ENSCs)
    Carmen Parra-Cid, Eduardo Orozco-Castillo, Julieta García-López, Elena Contreras-Figueroa, Laura E. Ramos-Languren, Clemente Ibarra, Alfonso Carreón-Rodríguez, Michael Aschner, Mina Königsberg, Abel Santamaría
    CNS & Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets .2020; 19(2): 148.     CrossRef
  • Arylsulfatase A (ASA) in Parkinson’s Disease: From Pathogenesis to Biomarker Potential
    Efthalia Angelopoulou, Yam Nath Paudel, Chiara Villa, Christina Piperi
    Brain Sciences.2020; 10(10): 713.     CrossRef
  • Bioenergetics and Autophagic Imbalance in Patients-Derived Cell Models of Parkinson Disease Supports Systemic Dysfunction in Neurodegeneration
    Ingrid González-Casacuberta, Diana Luz Juárez-Flores, Constanza Morén, Gloria Garrabou
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mitochondrial and autophagic alterations in skin fibroblasts from Parkinson disease patients with Parkin mutations
    Ingrid González-Casacuberta, Diana-Luz Juárez-Flores, Mario Ezquerra, Raquel Fucho, Marc Catalán-García, Mariona Guitart-Mampel, Ester Tobías, Carmen García-Ruiz, José Carlos Fernández-Checa, Eduard Tolosa, María-José Martí, Josep Maria Grau, Rubén Fernán
    Aging.2019; 11(11): 3750.     CrossRef
  • Implications of DNA Methylation in Parkinson’s Disease
    Ernesto Miranda-Morales, Karin Meier, Ada Sandoval-Carrillo, José Salas-Pacheco, Paola Vázquez-Cárdenas, Oscar Arias-Carrión
    Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Effects of Genetic Variants on Clinical Profiles of Parkinson’s Disease Assessed by the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and the Hoehn–Yahr Stage
    Chen Shi, Zheng Zheng, Qi Wang, Chaodong Wang, Dabao Zhang, Min Zhang, Piu Chan, Xiaomin Wang, Ornit Chiba-Falek
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(6): e0155758.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Orthostatic Hypotension in Drug-Naïve Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Hyo-Jin Bae, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jae Woo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(1):33-37.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11005
  • 9,590 View
  • 61 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose

Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is known to be present even in patients with early Parkinson’s disease (PD). To affirm the presence of OH and find correlation between OH and other dysautonomic symptoms in PD, this study has done in newly-diagnosed PD patients.

Methods

Forty-five non-demented patients with no prior history of treatment for PD were recruited (17 men, 63.8 ± 10.1 years of age). All the patients were evaluated for OH before starting medications. Autonomic symptoms were evaluated with structured questionnaires. Clinical characteristics of PD were evaluated (median Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.0 (1–3), 1.3 ± 1.1 years of disease duration), and comorbid medical conditions that could affect blood pressure were also recorded.

Results

OH was prevalent, and eighteen patients (40%) showed orthostatic hypotension, and twenty-seven (60%) did not (normotensive group). There was no significant difference in demographic and clinical characteristics between groups. The presence or severity of symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in the OH group also not differed from those of the normotensive group.

Conclusions

OH was prevalent even in the early stage of PD, and was not related to presence or severity of any other symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. Our findings suggest that clinicians should pay attention to OH from the early stage of disease.

Citations

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  • Pathophysiology of non-motor signs in Parkinson’s disease: some recent updating with brief presentation
    Khaled Radad, Rudolf Moldzio, Christopher Krewenka, Barbara Kranner, Wolf-Dieter Rausch
    Exploration of Neuroprotective Therapy.2023; : 24.     CrossRef
  • Central retinal microvasculature damage is associated with orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson’s disease
    Jong Hyeon Ahn, Min Chae Kang, Dongyoung Lee, Jin Whan Cho, Kyung-Ah Park, Jinyoung Youn
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pronounced Orthostatic Hypotension in GBA-Related Parkinson’s Disease
    Tatiana Usnich, Henrike Hanssen, Katja Lohmann, Christina Lohse, Christine Klein, Meike Kasten, Norbert Brüggemann
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; 12(5): 1539.     CrossRef
  • Could Small Heat Shock Protein HSP27 Be a First-Line Target for Preventing Protein Aggregation in Parkinson’s Disease?
    Javier Navarro-Zaragoza, Lorena Cuenca-Bermejo, Pilar Almela, María-Luisa Laorden, María-Trinidad Herrero
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(6): 3038.     CrossRef
  • Delayed orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson’s disease
    Sang-Won Yoo, Joong-Seok Kim, Ji-Yeon Yoo, Eunkyeong Yun, Uicheul Yoon, Na-Young Shin, Kwang-Soo Lee
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension in early stage Parkinson's disease: New insights from the first 105 patients of the BoProPark study
    Francesca Baschieri, Luisa Sambati, Pietro Guaraldi, Giorgio Barletta, Pietro Cortelli, Giovanna Calandra-Buonaura
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 93: 12.     CrossRef
  • Trajectory Analysis of Orthostatic Hypotension in Parkinson’s Disease: Results From Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative Cohort
    Kui Chen, Kangshuai Du, Yichen Zhao, Yongzhe Gu, Yanxin Zhao
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease: Implications for pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment
    Zhichun Chen, Guanglu Li, Jun Liu
    Neurobiology of Disease.2020; 134: 104700.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and factors related to orthostatic syndromes in recently diagnosed, drug-naïve patients with Parkinson disease
    Cecilia Quarracino, Matilde Otero-Losada, Francisco Capani, Santiago Pérez-Lloret
    Clinical Autonomic Research.2020; 30(3): 265.     CrossRef
  • Orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson disease
    Ylva Hivand Hiorth, Kenn Freddy Pedersen, Ingvild Dalen, Ole-Bjørn Tysnes, Guido Alves
    Neurology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The range and nature of non-motor symptoms in drug-naive Parkinson’s disease patients: a state-of-the-art systematic review
    Panagiotis Zis, Roberto Erro, Courtney C Walton, Anna Sauerbier, Kallol Ray Chaudhuri
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Orthostatic Hypotension and Cognitive Impairment in <i>De Novo</i> Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Hyo-Jin Bae, Jun-Ho Lim, Sang-Myung Cheon
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2014; 7(2): 102.     CrossRef
Autonomic Dysfunctions in Parkinsonian Disorders
Hyo-Jin Bae, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jae Woo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(2):72-77.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09019
  • 33,263 View
  • 92 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose:

Symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions are common in the patients with parkinsonian disorders. Because clinical features of autonomic dysfunctions are diverse, the comprehensive evaluation is essential for the appropriate management. For the appreciation of autonomic dysfunctions and the identification of differences, patients with degenerative parkinsonisms are evaluated using structured questionnaire for autonomic dysfunction (ADQ).

Methods:

Total 259 patients, including 192 patients with [idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD, age 64.6 ± 9.6 years)], 37 with [multiple system atrophy (MSA, 62.8 ± 9.1)], 9 with [dementia with Lewy body (DLB, 73.9 ± 4.3)], and 21 with [progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, 69.4 ± 9.6)]. The ADQ was structured for evaluation of the presence of symptoms and its severity due to autonomic dysfunction, covering gastrointestinal, urinary, sexual, cardiovascular and thermoregulatory domains. Patients were also evaluated for the orthostatic hypotension.

Results:

Although dementia with Lewy body (DLB) patients were oldest and duration of disease was longest in IPD, total ADQ scores of MSA and PSP (23.9 ± 12.6 and 21.1 ± 7.8) were significantly increased than that of IPD (15.1 ± 10.6). Urinary and cardiovascular symptom scores of MSA and gastrointestinal symptom score of PSP were significantly worse than those of IPD. The ratio of patient with orthostatic hypotension in IPD was 31.2% and not differed between groups (35.1% in MSA, 33.3% in DLB and 33.3% in PSP). But the systolic blood pressure dropped drastically after standing in patients with MSA and DLB than in patients with IPD and PSP.

Conclusions:

Patients with degenerative parkinsonism showed widespread symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions. The severity of those symptoms in patients with PSP were comparing to that of MSA patients and worse than that of IPD.

Citations

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  • Autonomic dysfunction in progressive supranuclear palsy
    Francesca Baschieri, Maria Vitiello, Pietro Cortelli, Giovanna Calandra-Buonaura, Francesca Morgante
    Journal of Neurology.2023; 270(1): 109.     CrossRef
  • Orthostatic hypotension in dementia with Lewy bodies: a meta-analysis of prospective studies
    Ahmet Turan Isik, Fatma Sena Dost, Idil Yavuz, Mehmet Selman Ontan, Esra Ates Bulut, Derya Kaya
    Clinical Autonomic Research.2023; 33(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • An Overview of Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Parkinsonian Syndromes
    Lauren Talman, Delaram Safarpour
    Seminars in Neurology.2023; 43(04): 583.     CrossRef
  • The Non-Motor Symptom Profile of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
    Sudhakar Pushpa Chaithra, Shweta Prasad, Vikram Venkappayya Holla, Albert Stezin, Nitish Kamble, Ravi Yadav, Pramod Kumar Pal
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2020; 13(2): 118.     CrossRef
  • Subtypes of Parkinson’s Disease: What Do They Tell Us About Disease Progression?
    Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad, Ronald B. Postuma
    Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Nonmotor Symptoms in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
    Ruwei Ou, Wei Song, Qianqian Wei, Ke Chen, Bei Cao, Yanbing Hou, Bi Zhao, Huifang Shang
    Parkinson's Disease.2016; 2016: 1.     CrossRef
The Correlation of ON and OFF Status With Clinical Characteristics in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Jung-Hwa Seo, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jae Woo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2008;1(2):65-70.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.08012
  • 8,960 View
  • 118 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background:

Status of the disease is the one of main concerns of clinicians, especially in the course of primary degenerative disorders. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is an useful clinical score that can express severity of parkinsonian symptoms, but L-DOPA treatment and motor fluctuations can change the UPDRS scores. Even in the best ‘on’ state, there can be residual motor deficits, and it is very difficult to estimate the worst ‘off’ state due to long duration effect of L-DOPA.

Objective:

To find relevant examination scores of ‘on’ or ‘off’ state of PD patients which correlates with clinical and demographic variables those can represents the status of Parkinson’s disease.

Methods:

Sixty-four patients with PD (24 male, age 63.0±8.6 years, Hoehn and Yahr stage (HY) 2.8±0.5) were examined UPDRS at ‘on’ and practically defined ‘off’ (12 hours after last medication) state. We evaluated the association between the ‘on’ and ‘off’ scores of UPDRS and duration of disease and treatment, and equivalent L-DOPA dose of the patients. Patients were grouped according to the presence of motor fluctuation to find the differences in those associations.

Results:

There were significantly strong correlations between UPDRS ‘off’ scores and clinical variables such as duration of disease and treatment. In ‘on’ state, only complication part of UPDRS was correlated with duration of disease and treatment, but activity of daily living (ADL) and motor part of UPDRS were correlated well with age of the patients. Age at disease onset showed significant negative association with the difference between ‘off’ and ‘on’ state UPDRS scores. Thirty-one patients who had motor fluctuation (9 male, age 62.7±9.3 years, HY 3.0±0.6) showed significantly increased duration of the disease, duration of L-DOPA treatment and equivalent DOPA dose compared to those of 33 patients without motor fluctuation (15 male, age 63.3±8.1 years, HY 2.6±0.3). In patients without motor fluctuation, both ‘off’ and ‘on’ UPDRS showed association with duration of disease and treatment, but ‘off’ and ‘off’ – ‘on’ difference of UPDRS were better correlated with duration of disease and treatment in patients with motor fluctuation.

Conclusion:

We found that the UPDRS scores of practically defined ‘off’ state significantly correlated with the duration of the disease and treatment. Patients with motor fluctuation revealed better responsiveness to medication than those without motor fluctuation. In patients without motor fluctuation, UPDRS scores of ‘on’ state can reflect the clinical presentation as much as those of ‘off’ state.

Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease
Jae Woo Kim, Hee Young Jo, Min Jeong Park, Sang-Myung Cheon
J Mov Disord. 2008;1(1):19-25.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.08004
  • 9,338 View
  • 94 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background

To determine the frequency of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) of Parkinson’s disease (PD, PDMCI) and its subtypes among non-demented PD patients, and to identify the influence of the age and presenting symptom on the development of PDMCI.

Methods:

A total 141 non-demented PD patients underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment including attention, language, visuospatial, memory and frontal functions. PDMCI was defined by neuropsychological testing and was classified into five subtypes. Patients were divided into two groups (tremor vs. akinetic-rigid type) for presenting symptom and three groups according to the age. Neuropsychological performance of patients was compared with normative data.

Results:

Almost half (49.6%) of non-demented PD patients had impairment in at least one domain and can be considered as having PDMCI. Executive type of PDMCI was the most frequent and amnestic, visuospatial, linguistic and attention types followed in the order of frequency. The population of PDMCI was increasing as the age of disease onset was higher. Whereas the frequency of executive and amnestic types of PDMCI was comparable in younger group, executive type was the most frequent in older group. The patients with tremor dominant type performed worse on tests, particularly on attention test.

Conclusions:

MCI was common even in the early stage of PD and the subtype was diverse. Unlike MCI developing Alzheimer’s disease later, executive type of PDMCI was the most common. Age was an important risk factor for development of MCI in PD. The concept of MCI should be introduced in PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Orthostatic Hypotension and Cognitive Impairment in <i>De Novo</i> Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Hyo-Jin Bae, Jun-Ho Lim, Sang-Myung Cheon
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2014; 7(2): 102.     CrossRef
  • Correlated regions of cerebral blood flow with clinical parameters in Parkinson’s disease; comparison using ‘Anatomy’ and ‘Talairach Daemon’ software
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    Annals of Nuclear Medicine.2012; 26(8): 656.     CrossRef
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    Hyun Jin Yoon, Kyung Won Park, Young Jin Jeong, Do-Young Kang
    Nuclear Medicine Communications.2012; 33(8): 848.     CrossRef
  • Utility and Limitations of Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised for Detecting Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease
    Natalie C. Komadina, Zoe Terpening, Yue Huang, Glenda M. Halliday, Sharon L. Naismith, Simon J.G. Lewis
    Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders.2011; 31(5): 349.     CrossRef
  • Characterizing mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease
    John C. Dalrymple‐Alford, Leslie Livingston, Michael R. MacAskill, Charlotte Graham, Tracy R. Melzer, Richard J. Porter, Richard Watts, Tim J. Anderson
    Movement Disorders.2011; 26(4): 629.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders