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Letter to the editor
Factors associated with anticholinergic-induced oral-buccal-lingual dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease
Joonyoung Ha, Suk Yun Kang, Kyoungwon Baik, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee, Min Seok Baek, Jin Yong Hong
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):109-111.   Published online September 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23069
  • 664 View
  • 66 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Review Article
Subjective Cognitive Complaints in Cognitively Normal Patients With Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review
Jin Yong Hong, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(1):1-12.   Published online November 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22059
  • 3,278 View
  • 322 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) refer to self-perceived cognitive decline and are related to objective cognitive decline. SCCs in cognitively normal individuals are considered a preclinical sign of subsequent cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease, and SCCs in cognitively normal patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are also gaining attention. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the current research on SCCs in cognitively normal patients with PD. A systematic search found a lack of consistency in the methodologies used to define and measure SCCs. Although the association between SCCs and objective cognitive performance in cognitively normal patients with PD is controversial, SCCs appear to be predictive of subsequent cognitive decline. These findings support the clinical value of SCCs in cognitively normal status in PD; however, further convincing evidence from biomarker studies is needed to provide a pathophysiological basis for these findings. Additionally, a consensus on the definition and assessment of SCCs is needed for further investigations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Subjective Cognitive Complaints in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis
    Mattia Siciliano, Alessandro Tessitore, Francesca Morgante, Jennifer G. Goldman, Lucia Ricciardi
    Movement Disorders.2024; 39(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: current view
    Kurt A. Jellinger
    Frontiers in Cognition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Neuropsychiatric Symptom Profiles With Cognitive Decline in Patients With Parkinson Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment
    Young-gun Lee, Mincheol Park, Seong Ho Jeong, Kyoungwon Baik, Sungwoo Kang, So Hoon Yoon, Han Kyu Na, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee
    Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy
    Jun Seok Lee, Jong Hyeon Ahn, Jong Mok Ha, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Daily Emotional Experiences in Persons with Parkinson Disease: Relations to Subjective Cognitive Complaints and Quality of Life
    Karen R. Hebert, Mackenzie Feldhacker
    Physical & Occupational Therapy In Geriatrics.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Pathobiology of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson Disease: Challenges and Outlooks
    Kurt A. Jellinger
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 25(1): 498.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Clinical Heterogeneity of Atypical Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration in Koreans
Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jongkyu Park, Ho-Sung Ryu, Hyeyoung Park, Young Eun Kim, Jin Yong Hong, Sang Ook Nam, Young-Hee Sung, Seung-Hwan Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Myung Jun Lee, Tae-Hyoung Kim, Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Sun Ju Chung, Seong Beom Koh, Phil Hyu Lee, Jin Whan Cho, Mee Young Park, Yun Joong Kim, Young H. Sohn, Beom Seok Jeon, Myung Sik Lee
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(1):20-27.   Published online January 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15058
  • 21,345 View
  • 226 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) represents a group of inherited movement disorders characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Recent advances have included the identification of new causative genes and highlighted the wide phenotypic variation between and within the specific NBIA subtypes. This study aimed to investigate the current status of NBIA in Korea.
Methods
We collected genetically confirmed NBIA patients from twelve nationwide referral hospitals and from a review of the literature. We conducted a study to describe the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Korean adults with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).
Results
Four subtypes of NBIA including PKAN (n = 30), PLA2G6-related neurodegeneration (n = 2), beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (n = 1), and aceruloplasminemia (n = 1) have been identified in the Korean population. The clinical features of fifteen adults with atypical PKAN included early focal limb dystonia, parkinsonism-predominant feature, oromandibular dystonia, and isolated freezing of gait (FOG). Patients with a higher age of onset tended to present with parkinsonism and FOG. The p.R440P and p.D378G mutations are two major mutations that represent approximately 50% of the mutated alleles. Although there were no specific genotype-phenotype correlations, most patients carrying the p.D378G mutation had a late-onset, atypical form of PKAN.
Conclusions
We found considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in Korean adults with atypical PKAN. The age of onset may influence the presentation of extrapyramidal symptoms.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Typical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration caused by compound heterozygous mutations in PANK2 gene in a Chinese patient: a case report and literature review
    Yilun Tao, Chen Zhao, Dong Han, Yiju Wei, Lihong Wang, Wenxia Song, Xiaoze Li
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The first Vietnamese patient who presented late onset of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration diagnosed by whole exome sequencing: A case report
    Van Khanh Tran, Chi Dung Vu, Hai Anh Tran, Nguyen Thi Kim Lien, Nguyen Van Tung, Nguyen Ngoc Lan, Huy Thinh Tran, Nguyen Huy Hoang
    Medicine.2023; 102(43): e34853.     CrossRef
  • Genetic mutation spectrum of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration expanded by breakpoint sequencing in pantothenate kinase 2 gene
    Dahae Yang, Sanghyun Cho, Sung Im Cho, Manjin Kim, Moon-Woo Seong, Sung Sup Park
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Outcomes of Deep Brain Stimulation in Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration-Related Dystonia
    Kyung Ah Woo, Han-Joon Kim, Seung-Ho Jeon, Hye Ran Park, Kye Won Park, Seung Hyun Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Hee Chae, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(3): 241.     CrossRef
  • Psychiatric symptoms in an adolescent reveal a novel compound heterozygous mutation of the PANK2 gene in the atypical PKAN syndrome
    Luz María González Huerta, Sorina Gómez González, Jaime Toral López
    Psychiatric Genetics.2021; 31(3): 95.     CrossRef
  • Rational Design of Novel Therapies for Pantothenate Kinase–Associated Neurodegeneration
    Nivedita Thakur, Thomas Klopstock, Suzanne Jackowski, Enej Kuscer, Fernando Tricta, Aleksandar Videnovic, Hyder A. Jinnah
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(9): 2005.     CrossRef
  • Atypical Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration with variable phenotypes in an Egyptian family
    Ali S. Shalash, Thomas W. Rösler, Ibrahim Y. Abdelrahman, Hatem S. Abulmakarem, Stefanie H. Müller, Franziska Hopfner, Gregor Kuhlenbäumer, Günter U. Höglinger, Mohamed Salama
    Heliyon.2021; : e07469.     CrossRef
  • Treatment Responsiveness of Parkinsonism in Atypical Pantothenate Kinase‐Associated Neurodegeneration
    Jeanne Feuerstein, Caroline Olvera, Michelle Fullard
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic and clinical experience of patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration
    Randall D. Marshall, Abigail Collins, Maria L. Escolar, H. A. Jinnah, Thomas Klopstock, Michael C. Kruer, Aleksandar Videnovic, Amy Robichaux-Viehoever, Colleen Burns, Laura L. Swett, Dennis A. Revicki, Randall H. Bender, William R. Lenderking
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intrafamilial variability and clinical heterogeneity in a family with PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration
    Jong Kyu Park, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
    Precision and Future Medicine.2019; 3(3): 135.     CrossRef
  • On the complexity of clinical and molecular bases of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation
    C. Tello, A. Darling, V. Lupo, B. Pérez‐Dueñas, C. Espinós
    Clinical Genetics.2018; 93(4): 731.     CrossRef
  • Looking Deep into the Eye-of-the-Tiger in Pantothenate Kinase–Associated Neurodegeneration
    J.-H. Lee, A. Gregory, P. Hogarth, C. Rogers, S.J. Hayflick
    American Journal of Neuroradiology.2018; 39(3): 583.     CrossRef
  • Parkinson’s Disease and Metal Storage Disorders: A Systematic Review
    Edward Botsford, Jayan George, Ellen Buckley
    Brain Sciences.2018; 8(11): 194.     CrossRef
  • Atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: Clinical description of two brothers and a review of the literature
    S. Mahoui, A. Benhaddadi, W. Ameur El Khedoud, M. Abada Bendib, M. Chaouch
    Revue Neurologique.2017; 173(10): 658.     CrossRef
  • Clinical rating scale for pantothenate kinase‐associated neurodegeneration: A pilot study
    Alejandra Darling, Cristina Tello, María Josep Martí, Cristina Garrido, Sergio Aguilera‐Albesa, Miguel Tomás Vila, Itziar Gastón, Marcos Madruga, Luis González Gutiérrez, Julio Ramos Lizana, Montserrat Pujol, Tania Gavilán Iglesias, Kylee Tustin, Jean Pie
    Movement Disorders.2017; 32(11): 1620.     CrossRef
  • Missions of <italic>Journal of Movement Disorders</italic>
    Yun Joong Kim
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2016; 9(1): 1.     CrossRef
Apathy and Olfactory Dysfunction in Early Parkinson’s Disease
Jin Yong Hong, Mun Kyung Sunwoo, Jee Hyun Ham, Jae Jung Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(1):21-25.   Published online January 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14029
  • 16,184 View
  • 111 Download
  • 22 Web of Science
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective Olfactory and emotional dysfunctions are very common in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Olfaction and emotions share common neuroanatomical substrates. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the association between olfactory and emotional dysfunctions in patients with PD.
Methods Parkinson’s disease patients who had been assessed for their olfactory function and neuropsychiatric symptoms including emotional dysfunction were included. A logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between low olfaction and different neuropsychiatric symptoms.
Results The patients with low olfaction (cross cultural smell identification test score ≤ 6) showed a higher prevalence of apathy when compared with those with high olfaction, whereas the frequencies of other neuropsychiatric symptoms were comparable between the two groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of apathy/indifference [odds ratio (OR) = 2.859, p = 0.007], age 70 years or more (OR = 2.281, p = 0.009), and the male gender (OR = 1.916, p = 0.030) were significantly associated with low olfaction.
Conclusions Our results demonstrate that apathy/indifference is a unique emotional dysfunction associated with olfactory dysfunction in PD. The findings also suggest that PD patients with low olfaction have a high prevalence of apathy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical features and neurobiochemical mechanisms of olfactory dysfunction in patients with Parkinson disease
    Ruidan Wang, Tenghong Lian, Mingyue He, Peng Guo, Shuyang Yu, Lijun Zuo, Yang Hu, Wei Zhang
    Journal of Neurology.2024; 271(4): 1959.     CrossRef
  • Neurons, Nose, and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Olfactory Function and Cognitive Impairment
    Irene Fatuzzo, Giovanni Francesco Niccolini, Federica Zoccali, Luca Cavalcanti, Mario Giuseppe Bellizzi, Gabriele Riccardi, Marco de Vincentiis, Marco Fiore, Carla Petrella, Antonio Minni, Christian Barbato
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(3): 2117.     CrossRef
  • Olfactory dysfunction is associated with motor function only in tremor-dominant Parkinson’s disease
    Fardin Nabizadeh, Kasra Pirahesh, Elham Khalili
    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(7): 4193.     CrossRef
  • The Power of Odor Persuasion: The Incorporation of Olfactory Cues in Virtual Environments for Personalized Relaxation
    Silvia Francesca Maria Pizzoli, Dario Monzani, Ketti Mazzocco, Emanuela Maggioni, Gabriella Pravettoni
    Perspectives on Psychological Science.2022; 17(3): 652.     CrossRef
  • Olfaction and apathy in early idiopathic Parkinson's disease
    Alfonso E. Martinez-Nunez, Kaitie Latack, Miguel Situ-Kcomt, Abhimanyu Mahajan
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 439: 120314.     CrossRef
  • Apathy in Parkinson’s Disease: Defining the Park Apathy Subtype
    Ségolène De Waele, Patrick Cras, David Crosiers
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(7): 923.     CrossRef
  • α‐Synuclein Spread from Olfactory Bulb Causes Hyposmia, Anxiety, and Memory Loss in BAC‐SNCA Mice
    Norihito Uemura, Jun Ueda, Toru Yoshihara, Masashi Ikuno, Maiko T. Uemura, Hodaka Yamakado, Masahide Asano, John Q. Trojanowski, Ryosuke Takahashi
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(9): 2036.     CrossRef
  • Hyposmia may predict development of freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease
    Jae Jung Lee, Jin Yong Hong, Jong Sam Baik
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2021; 128(6): 763.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Dopamine Depletion Patterns in Hyposmia- and Dysautonomia-Dominant Parkinson’s Disease
    Han Soo Yoo, Sangwon Lee, Seong Ho Jeong, Byoung Seok Ye, Young H. Sohn, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2021; 11(4): 1703.     CrossRef
  • Is There a Shared Etiology of Olfactory Impairments in Normal Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease?
    Mahraz Parvand, Catharine H. Rankin, Lori Beason-Held
    Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.2020; 73(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Open questions on the nature of Parkinson’s disease: from triggers to spreading pathology
    Lei Mou, Wei Ding, Pedro Fernandez-Funez
    Journal of Medical Genetics.2020; 57(2): 73.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Olfactory and Gustatory Dysfunction and Motor Symptoms on Body Weight in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Carla Masala, Francesco Loy, Raffaella Piras, Anna Liscia, Laura Fadda, Alan Moat, Paolo Solla, Giovanni Defazio
    Brain Sciences.2020; 10(4): 218.     CrossRef
  • Insula and Amygdala Atrophy Are Associated With Functional Impairment in Subjects With Presbycusis
    Chama Belkhiria, Rodrigo C. Vergara, Simón San Martin, Alexis Leiva, Melissa Martinez, Bruno Marcenaro, Maricarmen Andrade, Paul H. Delano, Carolina Delgado
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Runcheng He, Yuwen Zhao, Yan He, Yangjie Zhou, Jinxia Yang, Xiaoting Zhou, Liping Zhu, Xun Zhou, Zhenhua Liu, Qian Xu, Qiying Sun, Jieqiong Tan, Xinxiang Yan, Beisha Tang, Jifeng Guo
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    Dragos Mihaila, Jordan Donegan, Sarah Barns, Daria LaRocca, Qian Du, Danny Zheng, Michael Vidal, Christopher Neville, Richard Uhlig, Frank A. Middleton, Brenda A Wilson
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    Tetsuya Asakawa, Huan Fang, Kenji Sugiyama, Takao Nozaki, Susumu Kobayashi, Zhen Hong, Katsuaki Suzuki, Norio Mori, Yilin Yang, Fei Hua, Guanghong Ding, Guoqiang Wen, Hiroki Namba, Ying Xia
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Case Report
Parkinsonsim due to a Chronic Subdural Hematoma
Bosuk Park, Sook Keun Song, Jin Yong Hong, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(1):43-44.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09011
  • 11,828 View
  • 81 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of parkinsonism. We present the case of a 78-year-old man with right-side dominant parkinsonism about 3 months after a minor head injury. MRI reveals a chronic subdural hematoma on the left side with mildly displaced midline structures. The parkinsonian features were almost completely disappeared after neurosurgical evacuation of the hematoma without any anti-parkinson drug.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Systematic Review of Post-Traumatic Parkinsonism, an Emerging Parkinsonian Disorder Among Survivors of Traumatic Brain Injury
    Catherine Rojvirat, Gabriel R. Arismendi, Erin Feinstein, Maynard Guzman, Bruce A. Citron, Vedad Delic
    Neurotrauma Reports.2024; 5(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Parkinsonism-like features following reconstructive cranioplasty
    Mayank Tyagi, Charu Mahajan, Indu Kapoor, Hemanshu Prabhakar
    Neurological Sciences.2021; 42(4): 1591.     CrossRef
  • Chronic subdural hematoma-induced parkinsonism: A systematic review
    Achmad Fahmi, Heru Kustono, Komang Sena Adhistira, Heri Subianto, Budi Utomo, Agus Turchan
    Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery.2021; 208: 106826.     CrossRef
  • Secondary parkinsonism caused by chronic subdural hematomas owing to compressed cortex and a disturbed cortico–basal ganglia–thalamocortical circuit: illustrative case
    Masao Fukumura, Sho Murase, Yuzo Kuroda, Kazutomo Nakazawa, Yasufumi Gon
    Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders