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Letter to the editor
Task-Specific Dystonia in a Professional Billiard Player
Hyukje Lee, Sang-Won Yoo, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):86-88.   Published online September 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21055
  • 2,091 View
  • 125 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Erratum
The Impact of Impulsivity on Quality of Life in Early Drug-Naïve Parkinson’s Disease Patients
Dong-Woo Ryu, Joong-Seok Kim, Sang-Won Yoo, Yoon-Sang Oh, Kwang-Soo Lee
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):176-176.   Published online May 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19004.e
Corrects: J Mov Disord 2019;12(3):172
  • 2,191 View
  • 42 Download
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Letters to the editor
Asymmetric Periodic Leg Movements during Sleep after Unilateral Supratentorial Infarction: Two Legs with One Lesion
Sang-Won Yoo, Ko Eun Choi, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):232-234.   Published online June 3, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20004
  • 3,900 View
  • 55 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Unilateral Pseudo-Orthostatic Tremor Provoked by a Remote Limb Movement in Parkinson’s Disease
Sang-Won Yoo, Youngje Heo, Joong-Seok Kim, Kwang-Soo Lee
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):69-71.   Published online November 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19056
  • 3,666 View
  • 92 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material
Original Article
The Impact of Impulsivity on Quality of Life in Early Drug-Naïve Parkinson’s Disease Patients
Dong-Woo Ryu, Joong-Seok Kim, Sang-Won Yoo, Yoon-Sang Oh, Kwang-Soo Lee
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(3):172-176.   Published online August 9, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19004
Correction in: J Mov Disord 2021;14(2):176
  • 3,698 View
  • 98 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are mostly related to dopamine replacement therapy (DRT); however, drug-naïve PD patients have also frequently experienced impulsivity. This phenomenon makes clinicians hesitate treating patients with DRT. In this study, we assessed the effect of impulsivity on quality of life (QOL) in drug-naïve PD patients.
Methods
Two hundred three newly diagnosed, nonmedicated PD patients were enrolled, and they received structured clinical interviews, physical examinations and validated questionnaires to evaluate motor and nonmotor symptoms and QOL. Impulsivity was evaluated using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS).
Results
Thirty-eight patients (18.7%) had impulsivity with QUIP-RS scores ≥ 1 and 4 patients (2.0%) were diagnosed with combined ICDs. Motor and nonmotor symptoms were significantly correlated with the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index. Female sex and QUIP-RS scores were also correlated with QOL in drug-naïve PD patients.
Conclusion
The results of the present study showed that impulsivity negatively influences QOL in early drug-naïve PD patients. In addition, more severe motor and nonmotor symptoms were also associated with lower QOL. Such findings complicate treatment but provide valuable information for managing early PD.
Letter to the editor
Transient Hypersomnolence Provoked by Metoclopramide in a Patient with Degenerative Parkinsonism
Sang-Won Yoo, Ko Eun Choi, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):60-62.   Published online January 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18042
  • 5,014 View
  • 80 Download
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Original Articles
Validity and Reliability Study of the Korean Tinetti Mobility Test for Parkinson’s Disease
Jinse Park, Seong-Beom Koh, Hee Jin Kim, Eungseok Oh, Joong-Seok Kim, Ji Young Yun, Do-Young Kwon, Younsoo Kim, Ji Seon Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Jeong-Ho Park, Jinyoung Youn, Wooyoung Jang
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(1):24-29.   Published online January 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17058
  • 8,522 View
  • 243 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Postural instability and gait disturbance are the cardinal symptoms associated with falling among patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The Tinetti mobility test (TMT) is a well-established measurement tool used to predict falls among elderly people. However, the TMT has not been established or widely used among PD patients in Korea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the TMT for PD patients.
Methods
Twenty-four patients diagnosed with PD were enrolled in this study. For the interrater reliability test, thirteen clinicians scored the TMT after watching a video clip. We also used the test-retest method to determine intrarater reliability. For concurrent validation, the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale, Hoehn and Yahr staging, Berg Balance Scale, Timed-Up and Go test, 10-m walk test, and gait analysis by three-dimensional motion capture were also used. We analyzed receiver operating characteristic curve to predict falling.
Results
The interrater reliability and intrarater reliability of the Korean Tinetti balance scale were 0.97 and 0.98, respectively. The interrater reliability and intra-rater reliability of the Korean Tinetti gait scale were 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The Korean TMT scores were significantly correlated with the other clinical scales and three-dimensional motion capture. The cutoff values for predicting falling were 14 points (balance subscale) and 10 points (gait subscale).
Conclusion
We found that the Korean version of the TMT showed excellent validity and reliability for gait and balance and had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting falls among patients with PD.
Patients and Their Caregivers’ Burdens for Parkinson’s Disease in Korea
Jong Sam Baik, Joong-Seok Kim, Seong-Beom Koh, Jin Whan Cho, Phil Hyu Lee, Hyeo-Il Ma, Yun Joong Kim, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Yong Duk Kim, Seong-min Choi, Ho-Won Lee, Hee Tae Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):109-115.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17053
  • 5,610 View
  • 215 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Many patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from motor and non-motor symptoms. According to these variable symptoms of PD, patients or caregivers have a poorer quality of life than patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. Since the difficulties are varied for all patients, prioritizing their difficulties differs among all cases. The goal of this study was to investigate the burdens of PD among the caregivers as well as patients and to identify areas requiring aid from the government.
Methods
We surveyed the awareness and perceptions of PD in patients and caregivers of PD by a face-to-face questionnaire. The questionnaire was divided into three sections: symptoms of PD (part A), desire for policies (part B), and difficulties faced by their caregivers (part C). Part A comprised 8 questions, Part B had 2 questions, and Part C had 3 questions.
Results
In total, 853 subjects (702 patients and 151 caregivers) were enrolled in this study. The major difficulties experienced by PD patients were physical (67%), psychiatric (60%) and socio-economic (52%). Assessing the physical difficulties, more than half the patients experienced severe difficulties (29% very severe, 39% severe). Psychiatric difficulties were assessed as severe (35%) and very severe (21%) among the patients. Severe difficulties were also experienced socio-economically, at 52% in patients and 49% in caregivers, especially among patients in their fifties (58%) and those with their spouse (65%) as caregivers. The topmost need was the introduction of new technology for treatment of PD (62%), followed by relief of costs for treatment (38%) and a family support system (31%). The majority (91%) of the patients were diagnosed with PD within two years after onset of symptoms.
Conclusion
We know that the difficulties of PD and the needs for government assistance are different between patients and caregivers. These results emphasize that perceiving the difficulties and needs of patients and caregivers early can help to prevent and ameliorate the burden of disease.
Sleepiness and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease Patients Treated with Ropinirole and Levodopa
Suk Yun Kang, Ho-Sung Ryu, Mun-Kyung Sunwoo, Sang-Jin Kim, Jong-Sam Baik, Mee-Young Park, Hyung-Eun Park, Joong-Seok Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Seong-Beom Koh, Young-Eun Kim, Mi-Kyong Lee, Jong-Min Kim, Sun Ju Chung, Young-Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):123-129.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17048
  • 6,315 View
  • 181 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
We aimed to investigate the effect of ropinirole on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and depression in Parkinson’s disease (PD) with a large population.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional observational study at nine hospitals in Korea between April 24, 2013, and April 22, 2015. We analyzed the demographic and clinical features, other medical history, history of antiparkinsonian medication within 6 months, Hoehn and Yahr stage (HY stage), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and III, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30).
Results
Four-hundred-thirteen patients with PD (mean age: 65.2 ± 9.0 years; men: 227 patients) were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age at examination, UPDRS II, and GDS-30 were independent risk factors for EDS and that sex, UPDRS II, and ESS were independent risk factors for depression.
Conclusion
Our large group study did not find any significant associations of ropinirole with EDS and depression in Korean PD patients.
Validation of the Korean Version of the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease-Autonomic
Ji-Young Kim, In-Uk Song, Seong-Beom Koh, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jin Whan Cho, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee-Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do Young Kwon, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Ji Sun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hee Jin Kim, Jin Young Hong, Mi-Jung Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Ji Seon Kim, Eung Seok Oh, Hui-Jun Yang, Won Tae Yoon, Sooyeoun You, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Hyung-Eun Park, Su-Yun Lee, Younsoo Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):29-34.   Published online January 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16057
  • 12,454 View
  • 324 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Autonomic symptoms are commonly observed in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and often limit the activities of daily living. The Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT) was developed to evaluate and quantify autonomic symptoms in PD. The goal of this study was to translate the original SCOPA-AUT, which was written in English, into Korean and to evaluate its reliability and validity for Korean PD patients.
Methods
For the translation, the following processes were performed: forward translation, backward translation, expert review, pretest of the pre-final version and development of the final Korean version of SCOPA-AUT (K-SCOPA-AUT). In total, 127 patients with PD from 31 movement disorder clinics of university-affiliated hospitals in Korea were enrolled in this study. All patients were assessed using the K-SCOPA-AUT and other motor, non-motor, and quality of life scores. Test-retest reliability for the K-SCOPA-AUT was assessed over a time interval of 10−14 days.
Results
The internal consistency and reliability of the K-SCOPA-AUT was 0.727 as measured by the mean Cronbach’s α-coefficient. The test-retest correlation reliability was 0.859 by the Guttman split-half coefficient. The total K-SCOPA-AUT score showed a positive correlation with other non-motor symptoms [the Korean version of non-motor symptom scale (K-NMSS)], activities of daily living (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part II) and quality of life [the Korean version of Parkinson’s Disease Quality of Life 39 (K-PDQ39)].
Conclusion
The K-SCOPA-AUT had good reliability and validity for the assessment of autonomic dysfunction in Korean PD patients. Autonomic symptom severities were associated with many other motor and non-motor impairments and influenced quality of life.
Letter to the editor
Camptocormia with Transient Ischemic Attack
Ju-Hee Oh, Dong-Woo Ryu, Si-Hoon Lee, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):62-63.   Published online January 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16043
  • 5,901 View
  • 83 Download
  • 2 Citations
PDF
Original Article
Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Mild and Advanced Parkinson’s Disease
Joong-Seok Kim, Si-Hoon Lee, Yoon-Sang Oh, Jeong-Wook Park, Jae-Young An, Sung-Kyung Park, Si-Ryung Han, Kwang-Soo Lee
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):97-103.   Published online March 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16001
  • 17,065 View
  • 190 Download
  • 25 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The purpose of the present study was to investigate cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) with mild to severe stages of motor symptoms and to compare cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction between drug-naïve and dopaminergic drug-treated groups.
Methods
This study included 188 PD patients and 25 age-matched healthy controls who underwent head-up tilt-testing, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and 24-h Holter monitoring. Autonomic function test results were evaluated among groups categorized by motor symptom severities (mild vs. moderate vs. severe) and treatment (drug-naïve or dopaminergic drug treatment).
Results
Orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension were more frequent in patients with PD than in healthy controls. The frequencies of orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping were not different among groups. Additionally, no significant differences were detected in supine BP, orthostatic BP change, nighttime BP, nocturnal BP dipping, or heart rate variabilities among groups.
Conclusions
Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is not confined to moderate to severe PD patients, and starts early in the course of the disease in a high proportion of PD patients. In addition, dopaminergic drug treatments do not affect cardiovascular autonomic function.
Letter to the editor
Acute Chorea Onset after Hot Food Consumption in a Patient with Moyamoya Disease
Hye Young Jung, Jee Eun Lee, Ilung Kang, Yong Bang Kim, Hyung-Eun Park, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(1):50-52.   Published online January 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15048
  • 15,384 View
  • 76 Download
  • 5 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material
Original Article
Effect of Rivastigmine on Behavioral and Psychiatric Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease Dementia
Yoon-Sang Oh, Joong-Seok Kim, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(2):98-102.   Published online May 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15041
  • 18,030 View
  • 233 Download
  • 27 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective A recent study showed that rivastigmine and memantin improved behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in Alzheimer’s dementia. Furthermore, according to recent guidelines presented by the Movement Disorder Society, rivastigmine is efficacious for the treatment of dementia in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We investigated the efficacy of rivastigmine for BPSD in patients with Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD).
Methods Twenty-three patients in whom cognitive impairment occurred at least one year after a diagnosis of PD participated in this open-label trial. Cognitive, psychiatric, and motor symptoms were assessed before and after 24 weeks of treatment with rivastigmine using unstructured clinical assessments and rating scales including the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory.
Results Age (± standard deviation) was 74.7 ± 5.9 years, average duration of PD was 3.5 ± 3.7 years, Hoehn and Yahr scores were 2.2 ± 0.8, and baseline MMSE scores were 19.1 ± 4.2. Improvements in global mental symptoms and neuropsychiatric symptoms were significant; among them, hallucination, depression and appetite changes improved. Caregiver distress significantly decreased, including distress resulting from hallucinations, depression, apathy, and appetite changes.
Conclusions Although controlled trials are required, the findings suggest that rivastigmine is useful for control of several neuropsychiatric symptoms and beneficial for caregiver distress in patients with PDD.
Review Article
Gastrointestinal Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Joong-Seok Kim, Hye-Young Sung
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(2):76-82.   Published online May 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15008
  • 38,703 View
  • 246 Download
  • 33 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Currently, gastrointestinal dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are well-recognized problems and are known to be an initial symptom in the pathological process that eventually results in PD. Gastrointestinal symptoms may result from the involvement of either the central or enteric nervous systems, or these symptoms may be side effects of antiparkinsonian medications. Weight loss, excessive salivation, dysphagia, nausea/gastroparesis, constipation, and defecation dysfunction all may occur. Increased identification and early detection of these symptoms can result in a significant improvement in the quality of life for PD patients.

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders