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Neurological perspectives should be integrated into the management of tardive dyskinesia – expert opinion and proposed educational initiatives in Asia
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Thien Thien Lim, Pramod Kumar Pal, Hirohisa Watanabe, Jin Whan Cho, Hui-Fang Shang
Received March 17, 2024  Accepted April 11, 2024  Published online April 11, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24068    [Accepted]
  • 828 View
  • 46 Download
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From Evidence to the Dish: A Viewpoint of Implementing a Thai-Style Mediterranean Diet for Parkinson’s Disease
Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Nitinan Kantachadvanich, Vijittra Buranasrikul, Appasone Phoumindr, Saisamorn Phumphid, Priya Jagota, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):279-284.   Published online June 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23021
  • 1,681 View
  • 123 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
PDFSupplementary Material

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Old problems, new solutions: harnessing technology and innovation in Parkinson’s disease—evidence and experiences from Thailand
    Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The rise of Parkinson’s disease is a global challenge, but efforts to tackle this must begin at a national level: a protocol for national digital screening and “eat, move, sleep” lifestyle interventions to prevent or slow the rise of non-communicable dise
    Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Jirada Sringean, Saisamorn Phumphid, Chanawat Anan, Chusak Thanawattano, Suwijak Deoisres, Pattamon Panyakaew, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Suppata Maytharakcheep, Vijittra Buranasrikul, Tittaya Prasertpan, Rotjana Khontong, Priya Jagot
    Frontiers in Neurology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Articles
Nine Hereditary Movement Disorders First Described in Asia: Their History and Evolution
Priya Jagota, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Zakiyah Aldaajani, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Hiroyuki Ishiura, Yoshiko Nomura, Shoji Tsuji, Cid Diesta, Nobutaka Hattori, Osamu Onodera, Saeed Bohlega, Amir Al-Din, Shen-Yang Lim, Jee-Young Lee, Beomseok Jeon, Pramod Kumar Pal, Huifang Shang, Shinsuke Fujioka, Prashanth Lingappa Kukkle, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Chin-Hsien Lin, Cholpon Shambetova, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):231-247.   Published online June 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23065
  • 3,027 View
  • 234 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Clinical case studies and reporting are important to the discovery of new disorders and the advancement of medical sciences. Both clinicians and basic scientists play equally important roles leading to treatment discoveries for both cures and symptoms. In the field of movement disorders, exceptional observation of patients from clinicians is imperative, not just for phenomenology but also for the variable occurrences of these disorders, along with other signs and symptoms, throughout the day and the disease course. The Movement Disorders in Asia Task Force (TF) was formed to help enhance and promote collaboration and research on movement disorders within the region. As a start, the TF has reviewed the original studies of the movement disorders that were preliminarily described in the region. These include nine disorders that were first described in Asia: Segawa disease, PARK-Parkin, X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy, Kufor-Rakeb disease, tremulous dystonia associated with mutation of the calmodulin-binding transcription activator 2 gene, and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We hope that the information provided will honor the original researchers and help us learn and understand how earlier neurologists and basic scientists together discovered new disorders and made advances in the field, which impact us all to this day.
Historical and More Common Nongenetic Movement Disorders From Asia
Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Priya Jagota, Pramod Kumar Pal, Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Shen-Yang Lim, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Zakiyah Aldaajani, Beomseok Jeon, Shinsuke Fujioka, Jee-Young Lee, Prashanth Lingappa Kukkle, Huifang Shang, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Cid Diesta, Cholpon Shambetova, Chin-Hsien Lin
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):248-260.   Published online June 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22224
  • 2,142 View
  • 126 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Nongenetic movement disorders are common throughout the world. The movement disorders encountered may vary depending on the prevalence of certain disorders across various geographical regions. In this paper, we review historical and more common nongenetic movement disorders in Asia. The underlying causes of these movement disorders are diverse and include, among others, nutritional deficiencies, toxic and metabolic causes, and cultural Latah syndrome, contributed by geographical, economic, and cultural differences across Asia. The industrial revolution in Japan and Korea has led to diseases related to environmental toxin poisoning, such as Minamata disease and β-fluoroethyl acetate-associated cerebellar degeneration, respectively, while religious dietary restriction in the Indian subcontinent has led to infantile tremor syndrome related to vitamin B12 deficiency. In this review, we identify the salient features and key contributing factors in the development of these disorders.

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  • Diabetic striatopathy and other acute onset de novo movement disorders in hyperglycemia
    Subhankar Chatterjee, Ritwik Ghosh, Payel Biswas, Shambaditya Das, Samya Sengupta, Souvik Dubey, Biman Kanti Ray, Alak Pandit, Julián Benito-León, Rana Bhattacharjee
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2024; 18(3): 102997.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Safinamide as an Adjunct to Levodopa in Asian and Caucasian Patients With Parkinson’s Disease and Motor Fluctuations: A Post Hoc Analysis of the SETTLE Study
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Takayuki Ishida, Takanori Kamei, Ryan Edbert Husni, Ippei Suzuki, Shey Lin Wu, Jin Whan Cho
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(2):180-190.   Published online April 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22196
  • 2,055 View
  • 168 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Safinamide is a selective, reversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitor with demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in placebo-controlled studies and is clinically useful for patients with motor fluctuations. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of safinamide as a levodopa adjunct therapy in Asian patients with Parkinson’s disease.
Methods
Data from 173 Asian and 371 Caucasian patients from the international Phase III SETTLE study were included in this post hoc analysis. The safinamide dose was increased from 50 mg/day to 100 mg/day if no tolerability issues occurred at week 2. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to week 24 in daily ON-time without troublesome dyskinesia (i.e., ON-time). Key secondary outcomes included changes in Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores.
Results
Safinamide significantly increased daily ON-time relative to placebo in both groups (least-squares mean: 0.83 hours, p = 0.011 [Asians]; 1.05 hours, p < 0.0001 [Caucasians]). Motor function relative to placebo (UPDRS Part III) improved significantly in Asians (-2.65 points, p = 0.012) but not Caucasians (-1.44 points, p = 0.0576). Safinamide did not worsen Dyskinesia Rating Scale scores in either subgroup, regardless of the presence or absence of dyskinesia at baseline. Dyskinesia was largely mild for Asians and moderate for Caucasians. None of the Asian patients experienced adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation.
Conclusion
Safinamide as a levodopa adjunct is well tolerated and effective in reducing motor fluctuations in both Asian and Caucasian patients. Further studies to investigate the real-world effectiveness and safety of safinamide in Asia are warranted.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effects of Safinamide in Chinese and Non-Chinese Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Carlo Cattaneo, Jaime Kulisevsky
    Advances in Therapy.2024; 41(2): 638.     CrossRef
  • Safinamide as adjunctive therapy to levodopa monotherapy for patients with Parkinson's disease with wearing-off: The Japanese observational J-SILVER study
    Noriko Nishikawa, Taku Hatano, Kenya Nishioka, Shin-Ichi Ueno, Shinji Saiki, Ryota Nakamura, Asako Yoritaka, Takashi Ogawa, Yasushi Shimo, Wataru Sako, Hideki Shimura, Yoshiaki Furukawa, Takanori Kamei, Takayuki Ishida, Nobutaka Hattori
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2024; : 123051.     CrossRef
Umami and Other Taste Perceptions in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Priya Jagota, Nattida Chotechuang, Chanawat Anan, Teeraparp Kitjawijit, Chanchai Boonla, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):115-123.   Published online March 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21058
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  • 226 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Studies of taste perceptions in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have been controversial, and none of these studies have assessed umami taste. This study aimed to assess umami, along with the other 4 taste functions in PD patients.
Methods
Participants were tested for gustation using the modified filter paper disc method and olfaction using the modified Sniffin’ Stick-16 (mSS-16) test (only 14 culturally suitable items were used). A questionnaire evaluated patients’ subjective olfactory and gustatory dysfunction, taste preference, appetite, and food habits.
Results
A total of 105 PD patients and 101 age- and sex-matched controls were included. The body mass index (BMI) of PD patients was lower than that of controls (PD = 22.62, controls = 23.86, p = 0.028). The mSS-16 score was 10.7 for controls and 6.4 for PD patients (p < 0.001) (normal ≥ 9). Taste recognition thresholds (RTs) for sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami tastes were significantly higher in PD, indicating poorer gustation. All taste RTs correlated with each other, except for umami. Most patients were unaware of their dysfunction. Patients preferred sweet, salty and umami tastes more than the controls. Dysgeusia of different tastes in patients was differentially associated with poorer discrimination of tastes, an inability to identify the dish and adding extra seasoning to food. BMI and mSS-16 scores showed no correlation in either patients or controls.
Conclusion
PD patients have dysgeusia for all five tastes, including umami, which affects their appetite and diet. Patients preferred sweet, salty and umami tastes. This information can help adjust patients’ diets to improve their nutritional status.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The missing piece of the puzzle – The key role of the dietitian in the management of Parkinson's disease
    Richelle Flanagan, Carley Rusch, Fiona E. Lithander, Indu Subramanian
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; 121: 106021.     CrossRef
  • Body mass index in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review
    Yinghui Li, Yumei Liu, Chuanning Du, Jun Wang
    Journal of Neurophysiology.2024; 131(2): 311.     CrossRef
  • Apnea behavior in early- and late-stage mouse models of Parkinson's disease: Cineradiographic analysis of spontaneous breathing, acute stress, and swallowing
    Lorena Roberta de Souza Mendes Kawamura, Max Sarmet, Priscila Sales de Campos, Sachiko Takehara, Yasuhiro Kumei, Jorge Luis Lopes Zeredo
    Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology.2024; 323: 104239.     CrossRef
  • Gustatory dysfunction is related to Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Il‐Youp Kwak, Kyung Soo Kim, Hyun Jin Min
    International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology.2023; 13(10): 1949.     CrossRef
Brief communication
Validation of the Thai Version of the Movement Disorder Society-Sponsored Revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale
Priya Jagota, Prachaya Srivanitchapoom, Sitthi Petchrutchatachart, Surat Singmaneesakulchai, Apichart Pisarnpong, Praween Lolekha, Suwanna Setthawatcharawanich, Parnsiri Chairangsaris, Natlada Limotai, Pawut Mekawichai, Pattamon Panyakaew, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Jirada Sringean, Yuvadee Pitakpatapee, Nancy LaPelle, Pablo Martinez-Martin, Xuehan Ren, Sheng Luo, Glenn T. Stebbins, Christopher G. Goetz, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):151-155.   Published online March 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21104
  • 3,474 View
  • 160 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aims to validate the Thai translation of the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS).
Methods
The English version was translated into Thai and then back-translated into English. The translated version underwent 2 rounds of cognitive pretesting to assess the ease of comprehension, ease of use and comfort with the scale. Then, it underwent large clinimetric testing.
Results
The Thai version was validated in 354 PD patients. The comparative fit index (CFI) for all four parts of the Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS was 0.93 or greater. Exploratory factor analysis identified isolated item differences in factor structure between the Thai and English versions.
Conclusion
The overall factor structure of the Thai version was consistent with that of the English version based on the high CFIs (all CFI ≥ 0.90). Hence, it can be designated the official Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Validation of the Kazakh Version of the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale
    Saltanat Abdraimova, Zhanybek Myrzayev, Altynay Karimova, Altynay Talgatkyzy, Talgat Khaibullin, Gulnaz Kaishibayeva, Sandugash Elubaeva, Karlygash Esembekova, Dongrak Choi, Pablo Martinez-Martin, Christopher G. Goetz, Glenn T. Stebbins, Sheng Luo, Chingi
    Clinical Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; 10: 100232.     CrossRef
  • Residual effects of combined vibratory and plantar stimulation while seated influences plantar pressure and spatiotemporal gait measures in individuals with Parkinson’s disease exhibiting freezing of gait
    Warongporn Phuenpathom, Pattamon Panyakaew, Peerapon Vateekul, Decho Surangsrirat, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Global Epidemiology of Movement Disorders: Rare or Underdiagnosed?
    Sarah A. O'Shea, Ludy C. Shih
    Seminars in Neurology.2023; 43(01): 004.     CrossRef
  • Vibratory and plantar pressure stimulation: Steps to improve freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease
    Warongporn Phuenpathom, Pattamon Panyakaew, Peerapon Vateekul, Decho Surangsrirat, Akarin Hiransuthikul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 105: 43.     CrossRef
Letter to the editor
Peak-Dose Ballism Associated with Declining Implantable Pulse Generator Battery Life in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease
Denzel Chong Jen-Rei, Lim Thien Thien, Lee Hock Keong, Hoe Wei Leng, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):166-169.   Published online December 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20078
  • 4,221 View
  • 88 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Review Article
COVID-19: An Early Review of Its Global Impact and Considerations for Parkinson’s Disease Patient Care
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Sasivimol Virameteekul, Jong-Min Kim, Pramod Kr. Pal, Sun-Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):105-114.   Published online April 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20042
  • 20,799 View
  • 760 Download
  • 59 Web of Science
  • 55 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
While many infectious disorders are unknown to most neurologists, COVID-19 is very different. It has impacted neurologists and other health care workers, not only in our professional lives but also through the fear and panic within our own families, colleagues, patients and their families, and even in the wider public. COVID-19 affects all sorts of individuals, but the elderly with underlying chronic conditions are particularly at risk of severe disease, or even death. Parkinson’s disease (PD) shares a common profile as an age-dependent degenerative disorder, frequently associated with comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular diseases, so PD patients will almost certainly fall into the high-risk group. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explore the risk of COVID-19 in PD based on the susceptibility to severe disease, its impact on PD disease severity, potential long-term sequelae, and difficulties of PD management during this outbreak, where neurologists face various challenges on how we can maintain effective care for PD patients without exposing them, or ourselves, to the risk of infection. It is less than six months since the identification of the original COVID-19 case on New Year’s Eve 2019, so it is still too early to fully understand the natural history of COVID-19 and the evidence on COVID-19-related PD is scant. Though the possibilities presented are speculative, they are theory-based, and supported by prior evidence from other neurotrophic viruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2. Neurologists should be on high alert and vigilant for potential acute and chronic complications when encountering PD patients who are suspected of having COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Covid-19 in Parkinson's Disease treated by drugs or brain stimulation
    M. Salari, M. Etemadifar, A. Zali, Z. Aminzade, I. Navalpotro-Gomez, S. Tehrani Fateh
    Neurología.2024; 39(3): 254.     CrossRef
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    A.M. Fernández-Elgueta, H.F. Retamal-Matus, C. Núñez-Espinosa, P. Barria Aburto
    Rehabilitación.2024; 58(1): 100821.     CrossRef
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    Michela GOFFREDO, Francesca BAGLIO, Roberto DE ICCO, Stefania PROIETTI, Giorgio MAGGIONI, Andrea TUROLLA, Sanaz POURNAJAF, Johanna JONSDOTTIR, Federica ZENI, Sara FEDERICO, Luisa CACCIANTE, Matteo CIOETA, Cristina TASSORELLI, Marco FRANCESCHINI, Rocco S.
    European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Covid-19 in Parkinson's Disease treated by drugs or brain stimulation
    M. Salari, M. Etemadifar, A. Zali, Z. Aminzade, I. Navalpotro-Gomez, S. Tehrani Fateh
    Neurología (English Edition).2024; 39(3): 254.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Maryam Afraie, Ghobad Moradi, Pardis Mohammadzedeh, Mobin Azami, Sevda Riyahifar, Yousef Moradi
    Acta Neurologica Belgica.2023; 123(4): 1209.     CrossRef
  • Survey on the Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Patients with Parkinson’s Disease and Their Caregivers in Japan
    Nobutaka Hattori, Yoshiko Okada, Yayoi Kawata, Yoshihiko Furusawa, Takumi Imai, Hisako Yoshida, Mihoko Ota, Masaki Arai, Ayumi Shintani, Jovelle Fernandez
    Patient Preference and Adherence.2023; Volume 17: 1221.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and neurological disorders: what might connect Parkinson’s disease to SARS-CoV-2 infection
    Salvatore Iacono, Giuseppe Schirò, Chiara Davì, Sergio Mastrilli, Michelle Abbott, Fabrizio Guajana, Valentina Arnao, Paolo Aridon, Paolo Ragonese, Cesare Gagliardo, Claudia Colomba, Nicola Scichilone, Marco D’Amelio
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Worsening of Parkinson’s Disease After Termination of COVID-19 Quarantine Cannot Be Reversed Despite Resumption of Physiotherapy
    Christian Ineichen, Heide Vogel-Baumann, Matthias Sitzler, Günther Deuschl, Christian R. Baumann
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2023; 13(5): 845.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of COVID-19 on Parkinson’s Disease: A Case-Controlled Registry and Questionnaire Study on Clinical Markers and Patients’ Perceptions
    Gustav Cedergren Weber, Jonathan Timpka, Filip Bergquist, David Bäckström, Nil Dizdar, Karin Gunnarsson, Dag Nyholm, Per Svenningsson, Per Odin, Gessica Sala
    Acta Neurologica Scandinavica.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Remote Assessment of Parkinson’s Disease Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Lockdown in Mexico
    Rodrigo León-García, Emmanuel Ortega-Robles, Oscar Arias-Carrión
    Brain Sciences.2023; 13(7): 1114.     CrossRef
  • Social and economic development impact of elderly health care products based on design ethics
    Na Qi, Xun Zhang, Muhammad Attique Khan, Gaurav Dhiman, Sathishkumar VE
    Intelligent Data Analysis.2023; 27: 137.     CrossRef
  • The effects of an individualized smartphone-based exercise program on self-defined motor tasks in Parkinson’s disease: a long-term feasibility study
    Lisa Lützow, Isabelle Teckenburg, Veronika Koch, Franz Marxreiter, Jelena Jukic, Sabine Stallforth, Martin Regensburger, Jürgen Winkler, Jochen Klucken, Heiko Gaßner
    Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sasivimol Virameteekul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
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    Shivam Bhola, Jhillika Trisal, Vikram Thakur, Parneet Kaur, Saurabh Kulshrestha, Shashi Kant Bhatia, Pradeep Kumar
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  • Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Chronic Neurological Disorders: Focus on Patients with Dementia
    Maria Antonietta Barbieri, Gianluca Bagnato, Carmelo Ioppolo, Antonio Giovanni Versace, Natasha Irrera
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    Tfarah El Joumani, Hanan Rkain, Fatima Zahrae Taik, Kenza Hassouni, Redouane Abouqal, Sara Bahloul, Nada Alami, Latifa Tahiri, Najia Hajjaj-Hassouni, Fadoua Allali
    The Open Pain Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Z. A. Zalyalova, S. E. Munasipova, D. M. Khasanova, G. R. Ilyina, Z. G. Khayatova, N. I. Bagdanova
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  • Attitudes toward telemedicine of patients with Parkinson’s disease during the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Kanako Kurihara, Koichi Nagaki, Kotoe Inoue, Sumiko Yamamoto, Takayasu Mishima, Shinsuke Fujioka, Shinji Ouma, Yoshio Tsuboi
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  • Risk of Hospitalization and Death for COVID‐19 in People with Parkinson's Disease or Parkinsonism
    Luca Vignatelli, Corrado Zenesini, Laura M.B. Belotti, Elisa Baldin, Giuseppe Bonavina, Giovanna Calandra‐Buonaura, Pietro Cortelli, Carlo Descovich, Giovanni Fabbri, Giulia Giannini, Maria Guarino, Roberta Pantieri, Giuseppe Samoggia, Cesa Scaglione, Sus
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  • Impact of COVID-19 in the Mental Health in Elderly: Psychological and Biological Updates
    Roberta Eduarda Grolli, Maiqueli Eduarda Dama Mingoti, Amanda Gollo Bertollo, Adriana Remião Luzardo, João Quevedo, Gislaine Zilli Réus, Zuleide Maria Ignácio
    Molecular Neurobiology.2021; 58(5): 1905.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19: Implications for Sudden Death in Parkinson’s Disease
    Ana Claudia Fiorini, Marcelo Cunio Machado Fonseca, Carla Alessandra Scorza, Josef Finsterer, Antônio Márcio Rodrigues, Antônio-Carlos Guimarães de Almeida, Fulvio Alexandre Scorza
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2021; 14(1): 78.     CrossRef
  • Impact and Challenges of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Patients Requiring Botulinum Toxin A Treatment
    Azalea Tenerife Pajo, Adrian Isidoro Espiritu, Roland Dominic Go Jamora
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2021; 14(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 in age-related neurodegenerative diseases: is there a role for vitamin D3 as a possible therapeutic strategy?
    Milena de Barros Viana, Bárbara dos Anjos Rosário, Maria de Fátima Santana de Nazaré, Débora Estadella, Daniel Araki Ribeiro, Glauce Socorro de Barros Viana
    Reviews in the Neurosciences.2021; 32(2): 235.     CrossRef
  • How COVID-19 will boost remote exercise-based treatment in Parkinson’s disease: a narrative review
    Agnes Langer, Lucia Gassner, Anna Flotz, Sebastian Hasenauer, Jakob Gruber, Laurenz Wizany, Rochus Pokan, Walter Maetzler, Heidemarie Zach
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Neurological Manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 Induced Inflammation and Possible Therapeutic Strategies Against COVID-19
    Dipak Kumar, Sadaf Jahan, Andleeb Khan, Arif Jamal Siddiqui, Neeru Singh Redhu, Wahajuddin, Johra Khan, Saeed Banwas, Bader Alshehri, Mohammed Alaidarous
    Molecular Neurobiology.2021; 58(7): 3417.     CrossRef
  • Auswirkungen der COVID-19 Pandemie auf die medizinische Versorgung von Patienten mit angeborenen Blutungsneigungen
    Martin Olivieri, Susan Halimeh, Cornelia Wermes, Wolf Hassenpflug, Katharina Holstein, Sylvia von Mackensen
    Das Gesundheitswesen.2021; 83(04): 282.     CrossRef
  • Parkinsonism hyperpyraexia syndrome in Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation: An indirect consequence of COVID-19 lockdowns
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Letter to the editor
Beyond the Classic Segawa Disease, GCH1-Associated Neurodegenerative Parkinsonism: Practical Considerations for Physicians
Jirat Chenbhanich, Jirada Sringean, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(2):102-104.   Published online April 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17009
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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