Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
23 "Movement disorder"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Brief communication
COVID-19 vaccine related movement disorders: a systematic review
Grace Elysse D. Angeles, Lowrence Precious C. Dichoso, Roland Dominic G. Jamora
Received January 2, 2024  Accepted March 18, 2024  Published online March 19, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24001    [Accepted]
  • 368 View
  • 27 Download
  • 1 Comments
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Since the release of vaccines against COVID-19, there have been reports of vaccine-related neurologic complications. This study aimed to create a descriptive systematic review of movement disorders associated with COVID-19 vaccines.
Methods
We described the demographics, clinical presentation, management, outcomes, and proposed patho-mechanism. A systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. A standardized tool was used to assess the quality of the cases.
Results
We have identified 8 articles that met our inclusion criteria consisting of 10 patients who developed movement disorders after vaccination. The majority were males (n = 8), with a median age of 64.5 years. The most common movement disorder was hemichorea. The rest presented with generalized chorea with myoclonus, cervical dystonia, and akathisia. Most cases responded with immunotherapy. The standardized tool used showed that most studies have a low risk of bias.
Conclusion
The reported incidence of vaccine-related movement disorders was low in occurrence based on available published cases that were found.
Review Articles
Nine Hereditary Movement Disorders First Described in Asia: Their History and Evolution
Priya Jagota, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Zakiyah Aldaajani, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Hiroyuki Ishiura, Yoshiko Nomura, Shoji Tsuji, Cid Diesta, Nobutaka Hattori, Osamu Onodera, Saeed Bohlega, Amir Al-Din, Shen-Yang Lim, Jee-Young Lee, Beomseok Jeon, Pramod Kumar Pal, Huifang Shang, Shinsuke Fujioka, Prashanth Lingappa Kukkle, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Chin-Hsien Lin, Cholpon Shambetova, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):231-247.   Published online June 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23065
  • 2,792 View
  • 226 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Clinical case studies and reporting are important to the discovery of new disorders and the advancement of medical sciences. Both clinicians and basic scientists play equally important roles leading to treatment discoveries for both cures and symptoms. In the field of movement disorders, exceptional observation of patients from clinicians is imperative, not just for phenomenology but also for the variable occurrences of these disorders, along with other signs and symptoms, throughout the day and the disease course. The Movement Disorders in Asia Task Force (TF) was formed to help enhance and promote collaboration and research on movement disorders within the region. As a start, the TF has reviewed the original studies of the movement disorders that were preliminarily described in the region. These include nine disorders that were first described in Asia: Segawa disease, PARK-Parkin, X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy, Kufor-Rakeb disease, tremulous dystonia associated with mutation of the calmodulin-binding transcription activator 2 gene, and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We hope that the information provided will honor the original researchers and help us learn and understand how earlier neurologists and basic scientists together discovered new disorders and made advances in the field, which impact us all to this day.
Historical and More Common Nongenetic Movement Disorders From Asia
Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Priya Jagota, Pramod Kumar Pal, Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Shen-Yang Lim, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Zakiyah Aldaajani, Beomseok Jeon, Shinsuke Fujioka, Jee-Young Lee, Prashanth Lingappa Kukkle, Huifang Shang, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Cid Diesta, Cholpon Shambetova, Chin-Hsien Lin
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):248-260.   Published online June 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22224
  • 1,988 View
  • 124 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Nongenetic movement disorders are common throughout the world. The movement disorders encountered may vary depending on the prevalence of certain disorders across various geographical regions. In this paper, we review historical and more common nongenetic movement disorders in Asia. The underlying causes of these movement disorders are diverse and include, among others, nutritional deficiencies, toxic and metabolic causes, and cultural Latah syndrome, contributed by geographical, economic, and cultural differences across Asia. The industrial revolution in Japan and Korea has led to diseases related to environmental toxin poisoning, such as Minamata disease and β-fluoroethyl acetate-associated cerebellar degeneration, respectively, while religious dietary restriction in the Indian subcontinent has led to infantile tremor syndrome related to vitamin B12 deficiency. In this review, we identify the salient features and key contributing factors in the development of these disorders.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Diabetic striatopathy and other acute onset de novo movement disorders in hyperglycemia
    Subhankar Chatterjee, Ritwik Ghosh, Payel Biswas, Shambaditya Das, Samya Sengupta, Souvik Dubey, Biman Kanti Ray, Alak Pandit, Julián Benito-León, Rana Bhattacharjee
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2024; 18(3): 102997.     CrossRef
Adult-Onset Genetic Leukoencephalopathies With Movement Disorders
Mu-Hui Fu, Yung-Yee Chang
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(2):115-132.   Published online March 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22127
  • 3,955 View
  • 345 Download
  • 1 Comments
AbstractAbstract PDF
Genetic leukoencephalopathies (GLEs) are a group of white matter abnormalities with heterogeneous radiological and phenotypic features. Although these conditions have mostly been described in children, adult-onset cases are increasingly recognized owing to the widespread use of neuroimaging and advances in molecular genetic testing. The disease course is often progressive with a varied spectrum of presentations, trapping neurologists in the dilemma of differential diagnosis. Movement disorders are among the most common symptoms, and their diversity makes diagnosis challenging. In this review, we focus on adult-onset GLEs with movement disorders and offer a step-by-step diagnostic approach by clarifying the phenomenology of movement, advising investigations for acquired causes, describing the clinical and radiological clues to each disease, emphasizing the limitations of advanced molecular testing, and discussing the future application of artificial intelligence. We provide a list summarizing the leukoencephalopathies associated with different categories of movement disorders. In addition to guiding clinicians on how to narrow the list of differential diagnoses with the tools currently available, another aim of this review is to emphasize the inevitable trend toward applying advanced technology in diagnosing these difficult diseases.
Treatable Ataxias: How to Find the Needle in the Haystack?
Albert Stezin, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):206-226.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22069
  • 5,600 View
  • 498 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Treatable ataxias are a group of ataxic disorders with specific treatments. These disorders include genetic and metabolic disorders, immune-mediated ataxic disorders, and ataxic disorders associated with infectious and parainfectious etiology, vascular causes, toxins and chemicals, and endocrinopathies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of different treatable ataxias. The major metabolic and genetic treatable ataxic disorders include ataxia with vitamin E deficiency, abetalipoproteinemia, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, Niemann-Pick disease type C, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia due to coenzyme Q10 deficiency, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency, and episodic ataxia type 2. The treatment of these disorders includes the replacement of deficient cofactors and vitamins, dietary modifications, and other specific treatments. Treatable ataxias with immune-mediated etiologies include gluten ataxia, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated ataxia, steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, Miller-Fisher syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Although dietary modification with a gluten-free diet is adequate in gluten ataxia, other autoimmune ataxias are managed by short-course steroids, plasma exchange, or immunomodulation. For autoimmune ataxias secondary to malignancy, treatment of tumor can reduce ataxic symptoms. Chronic alcohol consumption, antiepileptics, anticancer drugs, exposure to insecticides, heavy metals, and recreational drugs are potentially avoidable and treatable causes of ataxia. Infective and parainfectious causes of cerebellar ataxias include acute cerebellitis, postinfectious ataxia, Whipple’s disease, meningoencephalitis, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. These disorders are treated with steroids and antibiotics. Recognizing treatable disorders is of paramount importance when dealing with ataxias given that early treatment can prevent permanent neurological sequelae.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Genetic Testing of Movements Disorders: A Review of Clinical Utility
    Dennis Yeow, Laura I. Rudaks, Sue-Faye Siow, Ryan L. Davis, Kishore R. Kumar
    Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rehabilitation in ataxia
    Anupam Gupta, NavinB Prakash, Hafis Rahman
    Indian Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.2023; 33(1): 21.     CrossRef
Diagnosis and Clinical Features in Autoimmune-Mediated Movement Disorders
Pei-Chen Hsieh, Yih-Ru Wu
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):95-105.   Published online May 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21077
  • 4,326 View
  • 539 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Movement disorders are common manifestations in autoimmune-mediated encephalitis. This group of diseases is suspected to be triggered by infection or neoplasm. Certain phenotypes correlate with specific autoantibody-related neurological disorders, such as orofacial-lingual dyskinesia with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis and faciobrachial dystonic seizures with leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 encephalitis. Early diagnosis and treatment, especially for autoantibodies targeting neuronal surface antigens, can improve prognosis. In contrast, the presence of autoantibodies against intracellular neuronal agents warrants screening for underlying malignancy. However, early clinical diagnosis is challenging because these diseases can be misdiagnosed. In this article, we review the distinctive clinical phenotypes, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and current treatment options for autoimmune-mediated encephalitis.
Gene Therapy for Huntington’s Disease: The Final Strategy for a Cure?
Seulgi Byun, Mijung Lee, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):15-20.   Published online November 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21006
  • 6,986 View
  • 430 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Huntington’s disease (HD) has become a target of the first clinical trials for gene therapy among movement disorders with a genetic origin. More than 100 clinical trials regarding HD have been tried, but all failed, although there were some improvements limited to symptomatic support. Compared to other neurogenetic disorders, HD is known to have a single genetic target. Thus, this is an advantage and its cure is more feasible than any other movement disorder with heterogeneous genetic causes. In this review paper, the authors attempt to cover the characteristics of HD itself while providing an overview of the gene transfer methods currently being researched, and will introduce an experimental trial with a preclinical model of HD followed by an update on the ongoing clinical trials for patients with HD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Huntington's Disease Gene Discovery
    Gustavo L. Franklin, Hélio A.G. Teive, Fernando Spina Tensini, Carlos Henrique Ferreira Camargo, Nayra de Souza Carvalho de Lima, Diego de Castro de dos Santos, Alex T. Meira, Sarah J. Tabrizi
    Movement Disorders.2024; 39(2): 227.     CrossRef
  • Optimizing Screening for Intrastriatal Interventions in Huntington's Disease Using Predictive Models
    Matthew J. Barrett, Ahmed Negida, Nitai Mukhopadhyay, Jin K. Kim, Huma Nawaz, Jefin Jose, Claudia Testa
    Movement Disorders.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exosomes for neurodegenerative diseases: diagnosis and targeted therapy
    Hui Tao, Bo Gao
    Journal of Neurology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Positron Emission Tomography Quantitative Assessment of Off-Target Whole-Body Biodistribution of I-124-Labeled Adeno-Associated Virus Capsids Administered to Cerebral Spinal Fluid
    Jonathan B. Rosenberg, Edward K. Fung, Jonathan P. Dyke, Bishnu P. De, Howard Lou, James M. Kelly, Layla Reejhsinghani, Rodolfo J. Ricart Arbona, Dolan Sondhi, Stephen M. Kaminsky, Nathalie Cartier, Christian Hinderer, Juliette Hordeaux, James M. Wilson,
    Human Gene Therapy.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • CRISPR: a tool with potential for genomic reprogramming in neurological disorders
    Yogesh K. Dhuriya, Aijaz A. Naik
    Molecular Biology Reports.2023; 50(2): 1845.     CrossRef
  • Gene therapy for selected neuromuscular and trinucleotide repeat disorders – An insight to subsume South Asia for multicenter clinical trials
    Nalaka Wijekoon, Lakmal Gonawala, Pyara Ratnayake, Darshana Sirisena, Harsha Gunasekara, Athula Dissanayake, Sunethra Senanayake, Ajantha Keshavaraj, Yetrib Hathout, Harry W.M. Steinbusch, Chandra Mohan, Ashwin Dalal, Eric Hoffman, K.Ranil D de Silva
    IBRO Neuroscience Reports.2023; 14: 146.     CrossRef
  • Huntington’s Disease Drug Development: A Phase 3 Pipeline Analysis
    Hannah J. Van de Roovaart, Nguyen Nguyen, Timothy D. Veenstra
    Pharmaceuticals.2023; 16(11): 1513.     CrossRef
  • Bioinspired Approaches for Central Nervous System Targeted Gene Delivery
    Jyotish Kumar, Afroz Karim, Ummy Habiba Sweety, Hemen Sarma, Md Nurunnabi, Mahesh Narayan
    ACS Applied Bio Materials.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mitochondrial organization and structure are compromised in fibroblasts from patients with Huntington’s disease
    Marie Vanisova, Hana Stufkova, Michaela Kohoutova, Tereza Rakosnikova, Jana Krizova, Jiri Klempir, Irena Rysankova, Jan Roth, Jiri Zeman, Hana Hansikova
    Ultrastructural Pathology.2022; 46(5): 462.     CrossRef
  • Pathogenesis of Huntington’s Disease: An Emphasis on Molecular Pathways and Prevention by Natural Remedies
    Zainab Irfan, Sofia Khanam, Varnita Karmakar, Sayeed Mohammed Firdous, Bothaina Samih Ismail Abou El Khier, Ilyas Khan, Muneeb U. Rehman, Andleeb Khan
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(10): 1389.     CrossRef
Brief communication
Clinical and Imaging Profile of Patients with Joubert Syndrome
Bharath Kumar Surisetti, Vikram Venkappayya Holla, Shweta Prasad, Koti Neeraja, Nitish Kamble, Ravi Yadav, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(3):231-235.   Published online September 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21066
  • 3,944 View
  • 115 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare syndrome characterized by ataxia and the molar tooth sign (MTS) on imaging. The present study aims to explore the clinical and radiological features in a cohort of patients with JS.
Methods
This was a retrospective chart review of patients with JS evaluated by movement disorder specialists.
Results
Nine patients were included in the study. All patients had facial dysmorphism and ocular abnormalities, and 4 patients had dystonia. Ocular tilt reaction and alternate skew deviation (66%) were the most common ocular abnormalities. Horizontally aligned superior cerebellar peduncles were observed in all four patients with diffusion tensor imaging, with a lack of decussation in three. Exome sequencing performed in four patients revealed novel variants in the MKS1, CPLANE1, and PIBF1 genes.
Conclusion
Facial dysmorphism, ocular abnormalities and classical imaging findings were observed in all patients with JS. Apart from ataxia, dystonia and myoclonus are other movement disorders observed in JS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical and genetic characteristics of 36 children with Joubert syndrome
    Yan Dong, Ke Zhang, He Yao, Tianming Jia, Jun Wang, Dengna Zhu, Falin Xu, Meiying Cheng, Shichao Zhao, Xiaoyi Shi
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • CEP104 gene may involve in the pathogenesis of a new developmental disorder other than joubert syndrome
    Reza Shervin Badv, Mojdeh Mahdiannasser, Maryam Rasoulinezhad, Laleh Habibi, Ali Rashidi-Nezhad
    Molecular Biology Reports.2022; 49(8): 7231.     CrossRef
  • Congenital Brain Malformations: An Integrated Diagnostic Approach
    Bimal P. Chaudhari, Mai-Lan Ho
    Seminars in Pediatric Neurology.2022; 42: 100973.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Patient Knowledge, Attitude and Perceptions towards Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Movement Disorders in India
Thavasimuthu Nisha Mol, Nitish Kamble, Vikram V. Holla, Rohan Mahale, Pramod Kumar Pal, Ravi Yadav
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):126-132.   Published online April 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20094
  • 4,481 View
  • 96 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
There is limited literature on the knowledge, attitude, and perceptions (KAP) of botulinum toxin (BoNT) treatment among patients and caregivers. The objective of this study was to assess the KAP in patients undergoing BoNT treatment for movement disorders.
Methods
One hundred patients with movement disorders from National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences Hospital in Bengaluru, South India, were recruited. The patients underwent demographic, clinical, and Patient Knowledge Questionnaire on Botulinum Toxin Use in Movement Disorders (PKQ-BMD)-based evaluations.
Results
The mean age of patients at the time of presentation was 47.97 ± 14.19 years (range, 12–79). Of all the patients, 26 (28%) patients were anxious, and 86% of these patients were reassured after appropriate counseling. There were 83 (89%) patients who found BoNT to be a costlier option. Education and previous Internet searches influenced positive performance in the “knowledge” domain and overall PKQ-BMD scores. The “number of injections” was also positively correlated with KAP performance.
Conclusion
This study showed that knowledge and perceptions about BoNT treatment need to be further improved. Wider availability of the Internet has provided a positive impact on patients’ and carers’ KAP. Internet-based information, higher educational qualifications of the patients, and a higher number of BoNT injection sessions are the most important predictors of satisfactory KAP related to BoNT injection treatment in patients with movement disorders.
Telemedicine in an Academic Movement Disorders Center during COVID-19
Christine Doss Esper, Laura Scorr, Sosi Papazian, Daniel Bartholomew, Gregory Jacob Esper, Stewart Alan Factor
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):119-125.   Published online March 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20099
  • 6,341 View
  • 146 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Telemedicine has rapidly gained momentum in movement disorder neurology during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic to preserve clinical care while mitigating the risks of in-person visits. We present data from the rapid implementation of virtual visits in a large, academic, movement disorder practice during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Methods
We describe the strategic shift to virtual visits and retrospectively examine elements that impacted the ability to switch to telemedicine visits using historical prepandemic in-person data as a comparator, including demographics, distance driven, and diagnosis distribution, with an additional focus on patients with deep brain stimulators.
Results
A total of 686 telemedicine visits were performed over a five-week period (60% of those previously scheduled for in-office visits). The average age of participants was 65 years, 45% were female, and 73% were Caucasian. Men were more likely to make the transition (p = 0.02). Telemedicine patients lived farther from the clinic than those seen in person (66.47 km vs. 42.16 km, p < 0.001), age was not associated with making the switch, and patient satisfaction did not change. There was a significant shift in the distribution of movement disorder diagnoses seen by telemedicine compared to prepandemic in-person visits (p < 0.001). Patients with deep brain stimulators were more likely to use telemedicine (11.5% vs. 7%, p < 0.001).
Conclusion
Telemedicine is feasible, viable and relevant in the care of movement disorder patients, although health care disparities appear evident for women and minorities. Patients with deep brain stimulators preferred telemedicine in our study. Further study is warranted to explore these findings.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Importance of Digital Health Literacy in an Evolving Parkinson’s Disease Care System
    Christine D. Esper, Blanca Y. Valdovinos, Ruth B. Schneider
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Long‐Lasting Impact of the COVID‐19 Pandemic on Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Their Relatives
    Andreas Wolfgang Wolff, Bernhard Haller, Antonia Franziska Demleitner, Dominik Pürner, Johanna Niederschweiberer, Isabell Cordts, Erica Westenberg, Paul Lingor
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2023; 10(5): 819.     CrossRef
  • Telemedicine technologies and applications in the era of COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review
    Esmaeil Mehraeen, SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi, Mohammad Heydari, Amirali Karimi, Abdollah Mahdavi, Mehrnaz Mashoufi, Arezoo Sarmad, Peyman Mirghaderi, Ahmadreza Shamsabadi, Kowsar Qaderi, Pegah Mirzapour, Amirata Fakhfouri, Hadiseh Azadi Cheshmekabodi, Kimia
    Health Informatics Journal.2023; 29(2): 146045822311674.     CrossRef
  • Racial disparities in access to DBS: results of a real-world U.S. claims data analysis
    Michael Frassica, Drew S. Kern, Mitra Afshari, Allison T. Connolly, Chengyuan Wu, Nathan Rowland, Juan Ramirez-Castaneda, Mwiza Ushe, Claudia Salazar, Xenos Mason
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interest and Satisfaction of Telemedicine Use Among Ambulatory Neurology Patients in Western North Carolina During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    K. Alexander Soltany, Reyna Segovia Molina, Carly Pappo, Sharon Thomson, Kelly Pring, Siobhan Cox, Rebecca Merrill, Emily Fishman, Alexander Ambrosini, Gabby Bognet, Kristen Dodenhoff, Heidi Munger Clary, Lauren Strauss, Rachel Graham, Amy K. Guzik, Roy E
    Telemedicine and e-Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Parkinson’s disease patients’ perspective on telephone visits during the COVID-19 pandemic
    Marta Magriço, Miguel Serôdio, Rita Ventura, Paulo Bugalho
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2023; 130(12): 1547.     CrossRef
  • Telemedicine in Neurology: A Scoping Review of Key Outcomes in Movement Disorders
    Emily Houston, Amanda G. Kennedy, Donna O'Malley, Terry Rabinowitz, Gail L. Rose, James Boyd
    Telemedicine and e-Health.2022; 28(3): 295.     CrossRef
  • Clinician and patient experience of neurology telephone consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic
    Tagore Nakornchai, Elena Conci, Anke Hensiek, J William L Brown
    Postgraduate Medical Journal.2022; 98(1161): 533.     CrossRef
  • Moving Forward from the COVID-19 Pandemic: Needed Changes in Movement Disorders Care and Research
    B. Y. Valdovinos, J. S. Modica, R. B. Schneider
    Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.2022; 22(2): 113.     CrossRef
  • Movement Disorder Specialists Survey Regarding Use of Telemedicine During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Shadi Ghourchian, Yasar A. Torres-Yaghi, Stuart H. Isaacson, Fernando Pagan, Kelly E. Lyons, Brian James Nagle, Sanskruti Patel, Rajesh Pahwa
    Telemedicine and e-Health.2022; 28(11): 1651.     CrossRef
  • Attitudes Toward Telehealth Services Among People Living With Parkinson's Disease: A Survey Study
    Yaqian Xu, Megan P. Feeney, Matthew Surface, Dan Novak, Michelle S. Troche, James C. Beck, Roy N. Alcalay
    Movement Disorders.2022; 37(6): 1289.     CrossRef
  • Service process factors affecting patients’ and clinicians’ experiences on rapid teleconsultation implementation in out-patient neurology services during COVID-19 pandemic: a scoping review
    Guangxia Meng, Carrie McAiney, Christopher M. Perlman, Ian McKillop, Therese Tisseverasinghe, Helen H. Chen
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Telemedicine in the Management of Parkinson’s Disease: Achievements, Challenges, and Future Perspectives
    Esther Cubo, Pedro David Delgado-López
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(12): 1735.     CrossRef
  • Clinician Perceptions of the Negative Impact of Telehealth Services in the Management of Drug-Induced Movement Disorders and Opportunities for Quality Improvement: A 2021 Internet-Based Survey
    Rimal Bera, Morgan Bron, Betsy Benning, Samantha Cicero, Heintje Calara, Diane Darling, Ericha Franey, Kendra Martello, Charles Yonan
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment.2022; Volume 18: 2945.     CrossRef
Clinical Characteristics of Involuntary Movement in Hospitalized Patients
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Hye Mi Lee, Seon-Min Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):31-36.   Published online December 20, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18040
  • 6,814 View
  • 203 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Neurological symptoms in hospitalized patients are not rare, and neurological consultation for movement disorders is especially important in evaluating or managing those with various movement disorders. Therefore, we investigated a clinical pattern of in-hospital consultations for various movement disorders in a tertiary care university hospital.
Methods
Over two years, a total of 202 patients (70.7 ± 11.8 years of age) presenting with movement disorders referred to movement disorder specialists were investigated.
Results
The main symptoms referred by nonneurologists were tremor (56.9%), parkinsonism (16.8%), and gait disturbance (8.9%). The most frequent diagnostic category was toxic/metabolic-caused movement disorder (T/MCMD) (35%) with regard to medications, followed by Parkinson’s disease (PD) (16%). Regarding the mode of onset, T/MCMD was the leading cause for acute (68%) and subacute onset (46%), while PD was the leading disorder (31%) for chronic onset.
Conclusion
The current study showed a characteristic pattern of inpatients presenting with movement disorders. Furthermore, our findings highlighted the clinical significance of drug use or metabolic problems for treating this patient population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Pattern and frequency of involuntary movements: hospital-based study
    H. N. El Tallawy, A. S. Shalash, M. A. Abdelhamed, R. E. Elsabrout
    The Egyptian Journal of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical Spectrum of Movement Disorders in Neurology Inpatients in a Tertiary Care Centre
    Shabeer Ahmad Paul, Gouranga Prasad Mondal, Ramesh Bhattacharyya, Kartik Chandra Ghosh, Sarbajit Das, Suman Das, Hema Krishna, Chandrakanta Patra
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice.2021; 12: 581.     CrossRef
Oromandibular Dystonia: Demographics and Clinical Data from 240 Patients
Linda Slaim, Myriam Cohen, Patrick Klap, Marie Vidailhet, Alain Perrin, Daniel Brasnu, Denis Ayache, Marie Mailly
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(2):78-81.   Published online May 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17065
  • 6,985 View
  • 226 Download
  • 22 Web of Science
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
To report demographic data from a large cohort of patients with oromandibular dystonia (OMD).
Methods
This is a retrospective review of patients with OMD referred to our institution between 1989 and 2015. Demographic (age of onset, gender, and familial history of dystonia) and clinical (type of OMD, associated dystonia, and etiology of dystonia) data were collected from a cohort of 240 individuals.
Results
The mean age of onset of OMD was 51.6 years old, with a female predominance (2:1). A family history of dystonia was found in 6 patients (2.5%). One hundred and forty-nine patients (62.1%) had the jaw-opening type of OMD, 48 patients (20.0%) had the jaw-closing type, and 43 patients (17.9%) had a mixed form of OMD. Lingual dystonia was also present in 64 (26.7%) of these patients. Eighty-two patients (34.2%) had a focal dystonia, 131 patients (54.6%) had a segmental dystonia, and 27 patients (11.3%) had a generalized dystonia. One hundred and seventy-one patients (71.3%) had idiopathic OMD.
Conclusion
OMD is a chronic and disabling focal dystonia. Our study found a prevalence of female patients, an onset in middle age and a predominantly idiopathic etiology. Unlike other studies, jaw-opening was found to be the most frequent clinical type of OMD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Surface electromyography for evaluating patients with oromandibular dystonia
    Jae-Hyung Kim, Byung-Gook Kim, Yeong-Gwan Im
    CRANIO®.2024; 42(3): 316.     CrossRef
  • Tongue dystonia as CIS and presenting symptom of multiple sclerosis
    Farid Shamlou, Narges Ebrahimi, Ahmad Chitsaz
    Neuroimmunology Reports.2024; 5: 100191.     CrossRef
  • Oromandibular dystonia: from onset to spread a multicenter italian study
    Assunta Trinchillo, Marcello Esposito, Carmen Terranova, Vincenzo Rizzo, Giovanni Fabbrini, Gina Ferrazzano, Daniele Belvisi, Roberto Erro, Paolo Barone, Francesco Bono, Francesca Di Biasio, Anna Rita Bentivoglio, Christian Lettieri, Maria Concetta Altavi
    Neurological Sciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Oromandibular Dystonia: Clinical and Demographic Data from Eight-Two Patients
    Mehmet Balal, Meltem Demirkiran
    Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Oromandibular Dystonia is a Prominent Feature in Patients with Aromatic L-Amino Acid Decarboxylase (AADC) Deficiency
    Helio van der Linden Jr., Christiane Cobas, Andre Felipe Pinto Duarte, Marcelo Rodrigues Masruha
    Journal of Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Screening.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical Presentation and Management of Peripheral-induced Oromandibular Dystonia in Nigeria: A Case Report and Literature Update
    Nonso Emmanuel Onyia, Mercy Okoh, Obinna Francis Igwilo, Izegboya Vivian Ukpebor, Eze Stephen Nwauzor
    Nigerian Journal of Medicine.2023; 32(4): 433.     CrossRef
  • Oromandibular dystonia – A systematic review
    Udit Saraf, Mitesh Chandarana, KP Divya, Syam Krishnan
    Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology.2022; 25(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • Botulinum Toxin Therapy for Oromandibular Dystonia and Other Movement Disorders in the Stomatognathic System
    Kazuya Yoshida
    Toxins.2022; 14(4): 282.     CrossRef
  • Botulinum toxin injections in jaw-opening dystonia. The lateral pterygoid – maxillary artery problem
    Sena Ünal, F. Tugra Karaarslan-Turk, Muhittin Cenk Akbostanci, Elif Peker, Rezzak Yilmaz
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.2022; 101: 217.     CrossRef
  • Oromandibular dystonia seen during pramipexole treatment: A rare case
    Fatma KARA, Mehmet Fatih GÖL, Ayhan VARLIBAŞ
    Journal of Surgery and Medicine.2022; 6(6): 1.     CrossRef
  • Dystonia, chorea, hemiballismus and other dyskinesias
    Matteo Bologna, Josep Valls-Solè, Nitish Kamble, Pramod Kumar Pal, Antonella Conte, Andrea Guerra, Daniele Belvisi, Alfredo Berardelli
    Clinical Neurophysiology.2022; 140: 110.     CrossRef
  • Movement disorders of the mouth: a review of the common phenomenologies
    C. M. Ghadery, L. V. Kalia, B. S. Connolly
    Journal of Neurology.2022; 269(11): 5812.     CrossRef
  • Botulinum Toxin in Movement Disorders: An Update
    Charenya Anandan, Joseph Jankovic
    Toxins.2021; 13(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • Temporomandibular disorder–related characteristics and treatment outcomes in Oromandibular Dystonia patients in two different clinical settings: A cross‐sectional study
    Asha Sude, Joseph Matsumoto, Shanti Kaimal, Ashley Petersen, Donald R. Nixdorf
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation.2021; 48(5): 542.     CrossRef
  • Jaw Pain and Oromandibular Dysfunction After a Complex Hospital Course
    Sarah Smith, Ny-Ying Lam
    American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.2021; 100(5): e62.     CrossRef
  • Oromandibular Dystonia: A Clinical Examination of 2,020 Cases
    Laura M. Scorr, Stewart A. Factor, Sahyli Perez Parra, Rachel Kaye, Randal C. Paniello, Scott A. Norris, Joel S. Perlmutter, Tobias Bäumer, Tatiana Usnich, Brian D. Berman, Marie Mailly, Emmanuel Roze, Marie Vidailhet, Joseph Jankovic, Mark S. LeDoux, Ric
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Treatment Outcomes in Oromandibular Dystonia Using Surface Electromyography: A Case Series
    Yeong-Gwan Im, Jae-Hyung Kim, Byung-Gook Kim
    Journal of Oral Medicine and Pain.2021; 46(4): 143.     CrossRef
  • Application of botulinum toxin in pregnancy and its impact on female reproductive health
    Wu Li, Min Tang
    Expert Opinion on Drug Safety.2020; 19(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and clinical characteristics of patients with oromandibular dystonia seen in the orofacial pain clinic: a retrospective study
    Asha Sude, Donald R. Nixdorf
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology.2020; 130(2): 169.     CrossRef
  • Clinical spectrum of focal dystonias: Experience from a tertiary care center
    Rupesh Prasad, Deepika Joshi, VijayN Mishra, RameshwarN Chaurasia, Abhishek Pathak
    Annals of Movement Disorders.2020; 3(2): 99.     CrossRef
  • Bite injury related to oromandibular dystonia extending to the maxillary sinus: A case report
    Yoshiro Koma, Takehiro Fujimoto, Shinji Uejima, Kotaro Sato, Keisuke Sugimoto, Satoshi Yamaguchi, Jun Ishikawa, Kazuya Nambu, Hideharu Hibi
    Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology.2020; 32(6): 503.     CrossRef
  • Botulinum neurotoxin a therapy efficacy and safety for oromandibular dystonia: a meta-analysis
    Pariessa D. Dadgardoust, Raymond L. Rosales, Ria Monica Asuncion, Dirk Dressler
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2019; 126(2): 141.     CrossRef
  • Botulinum Neurotoxin Therapy for Lingual Dystonia Using an Individualized Injection Method Based on Clinical Features
    Kazuya Yoshida
    Toxins.2019; 11(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro‐facial dysfunction—A follow‐up 8‐10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin
    Merete Bakke, Sara Baram, Torben Dalager, Heidi Bryde Biernat, Eigild Møller
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation.2019; 46(5): 441.     CrossRef
  • Pseudodystonia: A new perspective on an old phenomenon
    Rok Berlot, Kailash P. Bhatia, Maja Kojović
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2019; 62: 44.     CrossRef
  • Severe Jaw‐Opening Dystonia as an Unusual Manifestation of Levodopa‐Related Wearing‐Off in Parkinson's Disease, and Successful Treatment With Botulinum Toxin Injection
    Pankaj Ashok Agarwal
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2019; 6(6): 500.     CrossRef
Case Report
Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia as the Presenting and Only Manifestation of Multiple Sclerosis after Eighteen Months of Follow-Up
Marius Baguma, Michel Ossemann
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(2):96-98.   Published online March 24, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16055
  • 8,626 View
  • 173 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Other than tremor, movement disorders are uncommon in multiple sclerosis. Among these uncommon clinical manifestations, paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia is the most frequently reported. It is characterized by episodic attacks of involuntary movements that are induced by repetitive or sudden movements, startling noise or hyperventilation. The diagnosis is essentially clinical and based on a good observation of the attacks. It is very easy to misdiagnose it. We describe the case of a young female patient who presented paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia as the first and only clinical manifestation of multiple sclerosis, with no recurrence of attacks nor any other neurologic symptom after eighteen months of follow-up.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Tongue dystonia as CIS and presenting symptom of multiple sclerosis
    Farid Shamlou, Narges Ebrahimi, Ahmad Chitsaz
    Neuroimmunology Reports.2024; 5: 100191.     CrossRef
  • The Pathogenesis of Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia: Current Concepts
    Zi‐yi Li, Wo‐tu Tian, Xiao‐jun Huang, Li Cao
    Movement Disorders.2023; 38(4): 537.     CrossRef
  • Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: an expert consensus in China
    Li Cao, Xiaojun Huang, Ning Wang, Zhiying Wu, Cheng Zhang, Weihong Gu, Shuyan Cong, Jianhua Ma, Ling Wei, Yanchun Deng, Qi Fang, Qi Niu, Jin Wang, Zhaoxia Wang, You Yin, Jinyong Tian, Shufen Tian, Hongyan Bi, Hong Jiang, Xiaorong Liu, Yang Lü, Meizhen Sun
    Translational Neurodegeneration.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Les mouvements anormaux : mise au point
    M. Béreau, C. Tranchant
    La Revue de Médecine Interne.2018; 39(8): 641.     CrossRef
  • Lesion correlates of secondary paroxysmal dyskinesia in multiple sclerosis
    Kilian Fröhlich, Klemens Winder, Ralf A. Linker, Konstantin Huhn, Tobias Engelhorn, Arnd Dörfler, De-Hyung Lee, Stefan Schwab, Frank Seifert
    Journal of Neurology.2018; 265(10): 2277.     CrossRef
Original Article
Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Functional (Psychogenic) Movement Disorders
Vibhash D. Sharma, Randi Jones, Stewart A. Factor
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):40-44.   Published online December 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16038
  • 12,329 View
  • 189 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
As the literature for the treatment of functional (psychogenic) movement disorders (FMD) is sparse, we assessed clinical outcomes in patients with FMD who underwent treatment with psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDP).
Methods
A retrospective analysis of the data of patients with FMD who were referred for PDP from 2008−2014 at Emory University Medical Center was performed.
Results
Thirty patients were included, mean age at presentation was 50 years (SD 13.9) and majority were female (27/30). Most common movement disorder was involuntary shaking/jerky movements (50%) and tremor (43%). Mean duration of symptoms was 3.2 years and mean number of PDP visits was 4.9. PDP lead to good outcomes in 10, modest in 8, and poor in 9. Three patients lost to follow up. Mean duration of symptoms between two groups (good vs. poor) was not statistically significant (p = 0.11), mean number of PDP visits showed a trend towards significance (p = 0.053). In all cases of good outcomes precipitants of the movement disorder were identified and a majority (60%) was receptive of the diagnosis and had good insight.
Conclusion
PDP lead to improvement in 60% of the patients which is encouraging as the treatment is challenging. This study supports heterogeneous causes of FMD including varied roles of past/recent events and demonstrates importance of psychological approaches such as PDP. Treatment with PDP should be considered in some patients with FMD but predicting who will respond remains a challenge. Further long term prospective studies with large sample size and placebo control are needed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Functional Tic‐Like Behaviors: A Common Comorbidity in Patients with Tourette Syndrome
    Kirsten R. Müller‐Vahl, Anna Pisarenko, Carolin Fremer, Martina Haas, Ewgeni Jakubovski, Natalia Szejko
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2024; 11(3): 227.     CrossRef
  • Neuropsychiatric Treatment Approaches for Functional Neurological Disorder: A How to Guide
    Sara A. Finkelstein, Caitlin Adams, Margaret Tuttle, Aneeta Saxena, David L. Perez
    Seminars in Neurology.2022; 42(02): 204.     CrossRef
  • Functional tremor
    Petra Schwingenschuh, Alberto J. Espay
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 435: 120208.     CrossRef
  • Psychological interventions for treating functional motor symptoms: A systematic scoping review of the literature
    Erin M. Beal, Peter Coates, Cara Pelser
    Clinical Psychology Review.2022; 94: 102146.     CrossRef
  • Living with functional movement disorders: a tale of three battles. An interpretative phenomenological analysis
    Sylwia Bazydlo, Fiona J. R. Eccles
    Psychology & Health.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Management of Functional Seizures and Functional Movement Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study
    Bruno Gabriel Dal Pasquale, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive, Marcelo Daudt von der Heyde, Luana Francine Anad Dal Pasquale
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment.2022; Volume 18: 2121.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of a 5-day, intensive, multidisciplinary, outpatient physical and occupational therapy protocol in the treatment of functional movement disorders: A retrospective study
    Megan Reid, Steven D. Mitchell, Katharine M. Mitchell, Christos Sidiropoulos
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 443: 120461.     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis and therapy of functional tremor a systematic review illustrated by a case report
    Michael Bartl, Rebekka Kewitsch, Mark Hallett, Martin Tegenthoff, Walter Paulus
    Neurological Research and Practice.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Speech, language and swallowing impairments in functional neurological disorder: a scoping review
    Caroline Barnett, Jean Armes, Christina Smith
    International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders.2019; 54(3): 309.     CrossRef
  • Functional movement disorders in neurogeriatric inpatients
    Sara Mätzold, Johanna Geritz, Kirsten E. Zeuner, Daniela Berg, Steffen Paschen, Johanne Hieke, Simone Sablowsky, Christian Ortlieb, Philipp Bergmann, Werner Hofmann, Alberto J. Espay, Walter Maetzler
    Zeitschrift für Gerontologie und Geriatrie.2019; 52(4): 324.     CrossRef
  • Psychogenic (Functional) Movement Disorders
    Mary Ann Thenganatt, Joseph Jankovic
    CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology.2019; 25(4): 1121.     CrossRef
  • Disentangling Stigma from Functional Neurological Disorders: Conference Report and Roadmap for the Future
    Karen S. Rommelfanger, Stewart A. Factor, Suzette LaRoche, Phyllis Rosen, Raymond Young, Mark H. Rapaport
    Frontiers in Neurology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Article
Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 for Gene Editing in Hereditary Movement Disorders
Wooseok Im, Jangsup Moon, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(3):136-143.   Published online September 21, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16029
  • 20,618 View
  • 622 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Gene therapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating hereditary movement disorders, including hereditary ataxia, dystonia, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. Genome editing is a type of genetic engineering in which DNA is inserted, deleted or replaced in the genome using modified nucleases. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) has been used as an essential tool in biotechnology. Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease enzyme that was originally associated with the adaptive immune system of Streptococcus pyogenes and is now being utilized as a genome editing tool to induce double strand breaks in DNA. CRISPR/Cas9 has advantages in terms of clinical applicability over other genome editing technologies such as zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases because of easy in vivo delivery. Here, we review and discuss the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 to preclinical studies or gene therapy in hereditary movement disorders.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Current Status and Future Perspectives on Stem Cell-Based Therapies for Parkinson’s Disease
    Young Cha, Tae-Yoon Park, Pierre Leblanc, Kwang-Soo Kim
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2023; 16(1): 22.     CrossRef
  • Crispr-a novel approach towards a fortified immune system
    Vasudevan Ranganathan, Padma Madham, Prerana Shankpal, Charitha Sheri
    Journal of Microbiology & Experimentation.2023; 11(3): 73.     CrossRef
  • Gene Therapy Approach with an Emphasis on Growth Factors: Theoretical and Clinical Outcomes in Neurodegenerative Diseases
    Della Grace Thomas Parambi, Khalid Saad Alharbi, Rajesh Kumar, Seetha Harilal, Gaber El-Saber Batiha, Natália Cruz-Martins, Omnia Magdy, Arafa Musa, Dibya Sundar Panda, Bijo Mathew
    Molecular Neurobiology.2022; 59(1): 191.     CrossRef
  • Effects of the timing of electroporation during in vitro maturation on triple gene editing in porcine embryos using CRISPR/Cas9 system
    Zhao Namula, Manita Wittayarat, Lanh Thi Kim Do, Thanh Van Nguyen, Qingyi Lin, Koki Takebayashi, Maki Hirata, Fuminori Tanihara, Takeshige Otoi
    Veterinary and Animal Science.2022; 16: 100241.     CrossRef
  • Will CRISPR-Cas9 Have Cards to Play Against Cancer? An Update on its Applications
    Precilla S. Daisy, Kuduvalli S. Shreyas, T. S. Anitha
    Molecular Biotechnology.2021; 63(2): 93.     CrossRef
  • The significance of bioengineered nanoplatforms against SARS-CoV-2: From detection to genome editing
    Parichehr Hassanzadeh
    Life Sciences.2021; 274: 119289.     CrossRef
  • CRISPR/Cas9 Technology as a Modern Genetic Manipulation Tool for Recapitulating of Neurodegenerative Disorders in Large Animal Models
    Mahdi Barazesh, Shiva Mohammadi, Yadollah Bahrami, Pooneh Mokarram, Mohammad Hossein Morowvat, Massoud Saidijam, Morteza Karimipoor, Soudabeh Kavousipour, Amir Reza Vosoughi, Korosh Khanaki
    Current Gene Therapy.2021; 21(2): 130.     CrossRef
  • La edición del ADN
    Ithzayana Madariaga-Perpiñan, Juan Camilo Duque-Restrepo, Paola Ayala-Ramirez, Reggie García-Robles
    Iatreia.2020; 33(3): 262.     CrossRef
  • Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson’s and in some other diseases: recent advancement and future prospective
    Sachchida Nand Rai, Vivek K. Chaturvedi, Payal Singh, Brijesh Kumar Singh, M. P. Singh
    3 Biotech.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current Approaches to the Treatment of Hunter Syndrome
    Ekaterina Yu. Zakharova, Elena Yu. Voskoboeva, Alla N. Semyachkina, Nato D. Vashakmadze, Amina I. Gamzatova, Svetlana V. Mikhailova, Sergey I. Kutsev
    Pediatric pharmacology.2018; 15(4): 324.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders