Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
14 "Myoclonus"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Case Report
Myoclonus-Ataxia Syndrome Associated with COVID-19
Kuldeep Shetty, Atul Manchakrao Jadhav, Ranjith Jayanthakumar, Seema Jamwal, Tejaswini Shanubhogue, Mallepalli Prabhakar Reddy, Gopal Krishna Dash, Radhika Manohar, Vivek Jacob Philip, Vikram Huded
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):153-156.   Published online April 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20106
  • 4,912 View
  • 160 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Neurological manifestations of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have increasingly been reported since the onset of the pandemic. Herein, we report a relatively new presentation. A patient in the convalescence period following a febrile illness with lower respiratory tract infection (fever, myalgia, nonproductive cough) presented with generalized disabling myoclonus, which is phenotypically suggestive of brainstem origin, along with additional truncal cerebellar ataxia. His neurology work-ups, such as brain MRI, electroencephalography, serum autoimmune and paraneoplastic antibody testing, were normal. His CT chest scan revealed right lower lung infiltrates, and serological and other laboratory testing did not show evidence of active infection. COVID-19 titers turned out to be strongly positive, suggestive of post-COVID-19 lung sequelae. He responded partially to antimyoclonic drugs and fully to a course of steroids, suggesting a para- or postinfectious immune-mediated pathophysiology. Myoclonusataxia syndrome appears to be a neurological manifestation of COVID-19 infection, and knowledge regarding this phenomenon should be increased among clinicians for better patient care in a pandemic situation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Temporal Changes in Brain Perfusion in a Patient with Myoclonus and Ataxia Syndrome Associated with COVID-19
    Kenta Osawa, Atsuhiko Sugiyama, Akiyuki Uzawa, Shigeki Hirano, Tatsuya Yamamoto, Masahiko Nezu, Nobuyuki Araki, Hiroki Kano, Satoshi Kuwabara
    Internal Medicine.2022; 61(7): 1071.     CrossRef
  • Post‐infectious cerebellar ataxia following COVID ‐19 in a patient with epilepsy
    Sidhartha Chattopadhyay, Judhajit Sengupta, Sagar Basu
    Clinical and Experimental Neuroimmunology.2022; 13(4): 323.     CrossRef
  • Persistent neurological manifestations in long COVID-19 syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Rizaldy Taslim Pinzon, Vincent Ongko Wijaya, Abraham Al Jody, Patrick Nalla Nunsio, Ranbebasa Bijak Buana
    Journal of Infection and Public Health.2022; 15(8): 856.     CrossRef
  • Anti-neuronal antibodies against brainstem antigens are associated with COVID-19
    Guglielmo Lucchese, Antje Vogelgesang, Fabian Boesl, Dina Raafat, Silva Holtfreter, Barbara M. Bröker, Angela Stufano, Robert Fleischmann, Harald Prüss, Christiana Franke, Agnes Flöel
    eBioMedicine.2022; 83: 104211.     CrossRef
  • Post–COVID ‐19 Myoclonus–Ataxia Syndrome Responsive to Intravenous Immunoglobulins
    Massimiliano Godani, Alessandro Beronio, Giuseppe Lanza
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anti-GAD associated post-infectious cerebellitis after COVID-19 infection
    Ahmed Serkan Emekli, Asuman Parlak, Nejla Yılmaz Göcen, Murat Kürtüncü
    Neurological Sciences.2021; 42(10): 3995.     CrossRef
Review Article
Immune-Mediated Cerebellar Ataxias: Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Based on Immunological and Physiological Mechanisms
Hiroshi Mitoma, Mario Manto, Marios Hadjivassiliou
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):10-28.   Published online January 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20040
  • 7,282 View
  • 539 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the first description of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias (IMCAs) by Charcot in 1868, several milestones have been reached in our understanding of this group of neurological disorders. IMCAs have diverse etiologies, such as gluten ataxia, postinfectious cerebellitis, paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome, anti-GAD ataxia, and primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. The cerebellum, a vulnerable autoimmune target of the nervous system, has remarkable capacities (collectively known as the cerebellar reserve, closely linked to plasticity) to compensate and restore function following various pathological insults. Therefore, good prognosis is expected when immune-mediated therapeutic interventions are delivered during early stages when the cerebellar reserve can be preserved. However, some types of IMCAs show poor responses to immunotherapies, even if such therapies are introduced at an early stage. Thus, further research is needed to enhance our understanding of the autoimmune mechanisms underlying IMCAs, as such research could potentially lead to the development of more effective immunotherapies. We underscore the need to pursue the identification of robust biomarkers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Gluten Ataxia: an Underdiagnosed Condition
    Marios Hadjivassiliou, R. A. Grϋnewald
    The Cerebellum.2022; 21(4): 620.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Problem Solving: Decreased Level of Consciousness and Unexplained Hydrocephalus
    Naomi Niznick, Ronda Lun, Daniel A. Lelli, Tadeu A. Fantaneanu
    The Neurohospitalist.2022; 12(2): 312.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and vestibular disorders
    João Lemos, Mario Manto
    Current Opinion in Neurology.2022; 35(1): 118.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the Pathogenesis of Auto-antibody-Induced Cerebellar Synaptopathies
    Hiroshi Mitoma, Mario Manto
    The Cerebellum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in the Cerebellum
    Christiane S. Hampe, Hiroshi Mitoma
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(3): 328.     CrossRef
  • Acute Cerebellar Inflammation and Related Ataxia: Mechanisms and Pathophysiology
    Md. Sorwer Alam Parvez, Gen Ohtsuki
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(3): 367.     CrossRef
  • A Case Report of Anti-PCA-2-Positive Autoimmune Cerebellitis
    霞 董
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(04): 3272.     CrossRef
  • Cell-Autonomous Processes That Impair Xenograft Survival into the Cerebellum
    Lorenzo Magrassi, Giulia Nato, Domenico Delia, Annalisa Buffo
    The Cerebellum.2022; 21(5): 821.     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis and Clinical Features in Autoimmune-Mediated Movement Disorders
    Pei-Chen Hsieh, Yih-Ru Wu
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(2): 95.     CrossRef
  • Autoimmune cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 antibodies: Two pediatric cases
    Zhang Weihua, Ren Haitao, Deng Jie, Ren Changhong, Zhou Ji, Zhou Anna, Guan Hongzhi, Ren Xiaotun
    Journal of Neuroimmunology.2022; 370: 577918.     CrossRef
  • Anti-dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein 6 encephalitis with pure cerebellar ataxia: a case report
    Jing Lin, Min Zhu, Xiaocheng Mao, Zeqing Jin, Meihong Zhou, Daojun Hong
    BMC Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Central Positional Nystagmus
    Ana Inês Martins, André Jorge, João Lemos
    Current Treatment Options in Neurology.2022; 24(10): 453.     CrossRef
  • Paraneoplastic Ataxia: Antibodies at the Forefront Have Become Routine Biomarkers
    Lazaros C. Triarhou, Mario Manto
    The Cerebellum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rare Etiologies in Immune-Mediated Cerebellar Ataxias: Diagnostic Challenges
    Marios Hadjivassiliou, Mario Manto, Hiroshi Mitoma
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(9): 1165.     CrossRef
  • Paraneoplastic syndromes in neuro-ophthalmology
    SimonJ Hickman
    Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology.2022; 25(8): 101.     CrossRef
  • Immunotherapies for the Effective Treatment of Primary Autoimmune Cerebellar Ataxia: a Case Series
    Jiao Li, Bo Deng, Wenli Song, Keru Li, Jingwen Ai, Xiaoni Liu, Haocheng Zhang, Yi Zhang, Ke Lin, Guofu Shao, Chunfeng Liu, Wenhong Zhang, Xiangjun Chen, Yanlin Zhang
    The Cerebellum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stiff-Eye Syndrome—Anti-GAD Ataxia Presenting with Isolated Ophthalmoplegia: A Case Report
    Abel Dantas Belém, Thaís de Maria Frota Vasconcelos, Rafael César dos Anjos de Paula, Francisco Bruno Santana da Costa, Pedro Gustavo Barros Rodrigues, Isabelle de Sousa Pereira, Paulo Roberto de Arruda Tavares, Gabriela Studart Galdino, Daniel Aguiar Dia
    Brain Sciences.2021; 11(7): 932.     CrossRef
  • Update on Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration
    Philipp Alexander Loehrer, Lara Zieger, Ole J. Simon
    Brain Sciences.2021; 11(11): 1414.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Involuntary Movements Following Administration of Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 Pneumonia
Emmaline Zantua Fernando, Jeryl Ritzi Tan Yu, Salvador Miclat Abad Santos, Roland Dominic Go Jamora
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):75-77.   Published online December 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20091
  • 4,017 View
  • 107 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) has been used as an investigational drug for patients with moderate to severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). There have been concerns of potential harms from side effects of the drug. We present a case of a 38-year-old male who was started on HCQ for COVID-19 pneumonia. He was referred for evaluation of myoclonus of all extremities, which resolved after discontinuation of HCQ. The involuntary movements were first reported after the initiation of HCQ, persisted despite improvement in inflammatory and radiologic parameters and eventually resolved after HCQ discontinuation. This supports a possible causality related to adverse drug reactions from HCQ that have not been commonly reported.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety profile of COVID-19 drugs in a real clinical setting
    Mei Nee Chiu, Maitry Bhardwaj, Sangeeta Pilkhwal Sah
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.2022; 78(5): 733.     CrossRef
  • Eventos adversos no sistema nervoso central potencialmente relacionados aos medicamentos utilizados na COVID-19: revisão de escopo
    Vinícius de Mello, Vinícius de Paula Pereira, João Paulo Vilela Rodrigues, Suelem Tavares da Silva Penteado, Leonardo Régis Leira Pereira, Fabiana Rossi Varallo
    Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública.2022; 46: 1.     CrossRef
Sialidosis Type I without a Cherry Red Spot— Is There a Genetic Basis?
Koti Neeraja, Vikram Venkappayya Holla, Shweta Prasad, Bharath Kumar Surisetti, Kempaiah Rakesh, Nitish Kamble, Ravi Yadav, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):65-69.   Published online October 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20083
  • 3,544 View
  • 119 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Sialidosis is an inborn error of metabolism due to a defect in the NEU1 gene and manifests as two phenotypes: mild type I and severe type II. The cherry red spot (CRS) is a characteristic feature in both types of sialidosis; reports of sialidosis without a CRS are rare. We report two cases of genetically confirmed sialidosis type I with a typical presentation of progressive cortical myoclonus and ataxia but without the CRS. A previously reported homozygous pathogenic variant p.Arg294Cys was detected in the first case, and a novel homozygous pathogenic variant p.Arg305Pro was detected in the second case. Additionally, we reviewed the literature describing cases with similar mutations to find a genetic basis for the absence of a CRS. Milder mutation of both alleles detected in both patients may be the reason for the absence of a CRS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A fuzzy rule based machine intelligence model for cherry red spot disease detection of human eyes in IoMT
    Kalyan Kumar Jena, Sourav Kumar Bhoi, Debasis Mohapatra, Chittaranjan Mallick, Kshira Sagar Sahoo, Anand Nayyar
    Wireless Networks.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Focal Unilateral Palatal Myoclonus Causing Objective Clicking Tinnitus without Uvula Elevation Diagnosed by Concurrent Auscultation
Chindhuri Selvadurai, Sara Maguire Schaefer
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):223-224.   Published online July 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20010
  • 4,719 View
  • 79 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Palatal myoclonus generally entails a visible elevation of the palate and uvula and may be accompanied by myoclonus of other oropharyngeal muscles. A 55-year-old man presented with left ear clicking and hyperacusis. Examination showed arrhythmic left lateral soft palate contraction in the tensor veli palatini region without elevation of the uvula, which correlated with an audible click by auscultation with a stethoscope over the left ear. This is a rare case of focal, unilateral palatal myoclonus without visual uvula elevation with concurrent auscultation, demonstrating the importance of careful examination to detect focal myoclonic contractions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Tinnitus
    Navdeep Bhamra, Charlotte Juman, Edward Balai
    InnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practice.2021; 14(9): 546.     CrossRef
Review Article
Principles of Electrophysiological Assessments for Movement Disorders
Kai-Hsiang Stanley Chen, Robert Chen
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):27-38.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19064
  • 10,429 View
  • 885 Download
  • 23 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Electrophysiological studies can provide objective and quantifiable assessments of movement disorders. They are useful in the diagnosis of hyperkinetic movement disorders, particularly tremors and myoclonus. The most commonly used measures are surface electromyography (sEMG), electroencephalography (EEG) and accelerometry. Frequency and coherence analyses of sEMG signals may reveal the nature of tremors and the source of the tremors. The effects of voluntary tapping, ballistic movements and weighting of the limbs can help to distinguish between organic and functional tremors. The presence of Bereitschafts-potentials and beta-band desynchronization recorded by EEG before movement onset provide strong evidence for functional movement disorders. EMG burst durations, distributions and muscle recruitment orders may identify and classify myoclonus to cortical, subcortical or spinal origins and help in the diagnosis of functional myoclonus. Organic and functional cervical dystonia can potentially be distinguished by EMG power spectral analysis. Several reflex circuits, such as the long latency reflex, blink reflex and startle reflex, can be elicited with different types of external stimuli and are useful in the assessment of myoclonus, excessive startle and stiff person syndrome. However, limitations of the tests should be recognized, and the results should be interpreted together with clinical observations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The clinical and electrophysiological investigation of tremor
    Günther Deuschl, Jos S. Becktepe, Michiel Dirkx, Dietrich Haubenberger, Anhar Hassan, Rick C. Helmich, Muthuraman Muthuraman, Pattamon Panyakaew, Petra Schwingenschuh, Kirsten E. Zeuner, Rodger J. Elble
    Clinical Neurophysiology.2022; 136: 93.     CrossRef
  • Remote measurement and home monitoring of tremor
    Zoltan Mari, Dietrich Haubenberger
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 435: 120201.     CrossRef
  • Functional tremor
    Petra Schwingenschuh, Alberto J. Espay
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 435: 120208.     CrossRef
  • Speech-induced action myoclonus
    Hugh D. Simpson, Joseph R. Duffy, Julie A.G. Stierwalt, J. Eric Ahlskog, Anhar Hassan
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 98: 41.     CrossRef
  • Simulation of the physical process of neural electromagnetic signal generation based on a simple but functional bionic Na+ channel
    Fan Wang, Jingjing Xu, Yanbin Ge, Shengyong Xu, Yanjun Fu, Caiyu Shi, Jianming Xue
    Chinese Physics B.2022; 31(6): 068701.     CrossRef
  • Functional Patients Referred for Deep Brain Stimulation: How Common Is it?
    Carolina Gorodetsky, Paula Azevedo, Alfonso Fasano
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2022; 9(6): 841.     CrossRef
  • Myoclonus and other jerky movement disorders
    Sterre van der Veen, John N. Caviness, Yasmine E.M. Dreissen, Christos Ganos, Abubaker Ibrahim, Johannes H.T.M. Koelman, Ambra Stefani, Marina A.J. Tijssen
    Clinical Neurophysiology Practice.2022; 7: 285.     CrossRef
  • Posthypoxic Segmental Spinal “Flutter”-Like Myoclonus
    BobyV Maramattom
    Neurology India.2022; 70(5): 2202.     CrossRef
  • Contemporary clinical neurophysiology applications in dystonia
    Petr Kaňovský, Raymond Rosales, Pavel Otruba, Martin Nevrlý, Lenka Hvizdošová, Robert Opavský, Michaela Kaiserová, Pavel Hok, Kateřina Menšíková, Petr Hluštík, Martin Bareš
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2021; 128(4): 509.     CrossRef
  • Suggestibility as a valuable criterion for laboratory-supported definite functional movement disorders
    Gerard Saranza, Daniel Vargas-Mendez, Anthony E. Lang, Robert Chen
    Clinical Neurophysiology Practice.2021; 6: 103.     CrossRef
  • Peribuccal and pharyngeal myorhythmia as a presenting symptom of hypertrophic olivary degeneration: Expert commentary
    Robert Chen
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 85: 144.     CrossRef
  • Nano‐dielectrics in biosystems
    Jingjing Xu, Fan Wang, Yihan Song, Song Ge, Shengyong Xu
    IET Nanodielectrics.2021; 4(4): 179.     CrossRef
  • Asterixis of peripheral origin: isolated lower limb asterixis in Guillain–Barre syndrome
    Boby Varkey Maramattom
    Acta Neurologica Belgica.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Jaw Pain and Oromandibular Dysfunction After a Complex Hospital Course
    Sarah Smith, Ny-Ying Lam
    American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.2021; 100(5): e62.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the Surgical Decision in Dystonia Patients Referred for Deep Brain Stimulation
    Carolina Gorodetsky, Paula Azevedo, Carolina Candeias da Silva, Alfonso Fasano
    Toxins.2021; 13(8): 511.     CrossRef
  • Tremor Syndromes: An Updated Review
    Abhishek Lenka, Joseph Jankovic
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The diagnostic value of clinical neurophysiology in hyperkinetic movement disorders: A systematic review
    S. van der Veen, M.R. Klamer, J.W.J. Elting, J.H.T.M. Koelman, A.M.M. van der Stouwe, M.A.J. Tijssen
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 89: 176.     CrossRef
  • Wearable monitoring of positive and negative myoclonus in progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1
    Saara M. Rissanen, Jelena Hyppönen, Katri Silvennoinen, Laura Säisänen, Pasi A. Karjalainen, Esa Mervaala, Reetta Kälviäinen
    Clinical Neurophysiology.2021; 132(10): 2464.     CrossRef
  • Surface electromyography for evaluating patients with oromandibular dystonia
    Jae-Hyung Kim, Byung-Gook Kim, Yeong-Gwan Im
    CRANIO®.2021; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of movement and brain activity
    Mark Hallett, Lourdes M. DelRosso, Rodger Elble, Raffaele Ferri, Fay B. Horak, Stephan Lehericy, Martina Mancini, Masao Matsuhashi, Riki Matsumoto, Muthuraman Muthuraman, Jan Raethjen, Hiroshi Shibasaki
    Clinical Neurophysiology.2021; 132(10): 2608.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Psychological Aspects of Myoclonus in Different age Periods
    Т.А. Литовченко, О.Ю. Сухоносова
    Психиатрия, психотерапия и клиническая психология.2021; (2): 303.     CrossRef
  • Minimum Electromyographic Burst Duration in Healthy Controls: Implications for Electrodiagnosis in Movement Disorders
    Alexis F. Collins, Steven T.R. Brown, Mark R. Baker
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2020; 7(7): 827.     CrossRef
  • Physiology-Based Treatment of Myoclonus
    Ashley B. Pena, John N. Caviness
    Neurotherapeutics.2020; 17(4): 1665.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Spinal Myoclonus Responding to Continuous Intrathecal Morphine Pump
Jung-Eun Ahn, Dallah Yoo, Ki-Young Jung, Jong-Min Kim, Beomseok Jeon, Myung Chong Lee
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):158-160.   Published online September 12, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17023
  • 5,107 View
  • 113 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Spinal myoclonus is a sudden, brief, and involuntary movement of segmental or propriospinal muscle groups. Spinal myoclonus has occasionally been reported in patients undergoing opioid therapy, but the pathophysiology of opioid-induced myoclonus has not been elucidated yet. Here, we present two patients with spinal segmental myoclonus secondary to ischemic and radiation myelopathy. Conventional medications did not help treat persistent myoclonus in both legs. Continuous intrathecal morphine infusion was implanted for pain control in one patient, which relieved spinal myoclonus entirely. This experience led to the application of this method with a second patient, leading to the same gratifying result. Spinal myoclonus reemerged as soon as the morphine pumps were off, which confirmed the therapeutic role of opioids. In contrast to the opioid-induced myoclonus, these cases show a benefit of opioids on spinal myoclonus, which could be explained by synaptic reorganization after pathologic insults in the spinal cord.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Spinal segmental myoclonus following spinal surgery
    Shrikant Pande, Kokcher Ang, May Win Myat, Shermyn Neo, Sivashankar Subramaniam
    British Journal of Neurosurgery.2020; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Myoclonus: An Electrophysiological Diagnosis
    Shabbir Hussain I. Merchant, Felipe Vial‐Undurraga, Giorgio Leodori, Jay A. Gerpen, Mark Hallett
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2020; 7(5): 489.     CrossRef
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Thailand: A Case Series and Review of the Literature
Praween Lolekha, Ahmed Rasheed, Chutanat Yotsarawat
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(3):136-140.   Published online September 10, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15014
  • 16,931 View
  • 78 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is an incurable and inevitably fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Although CJD has a worldwide distribution, there are no official statistics on CJD in Thailand. A diagnosis of CJD is suspected when a patient develops rapidly progressive dementia with myoclonus. However, CJD may be mistaken for a variety of illnesses because its initial presentation frequently consists of non-specific symptoms. Here, we examined cases of sporadic CJD (sCJD) from Thammasat University Hospital (a tertiary care hospital in Thailand) between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014. Three cases of probable and possible sCJD were collected. All cases presented with rapidly progressive cognitive dysfunction accompanied by spontaneous myoclonus. Classical electroencehalography changes and typical abnormal MRI features were observed. All of the cases died within a period of 8 months. None of the patients underwent brain biopsy. Our findings raise questions about the prevalence of CJD in Thailand, which needs further study.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The importance of ongoing international surveillance for Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease
    Neil Watson, Jean-Philippe Brandel, Alison Green, Peter Hermann, Anna Ladogana, Terri Lindsay, Janet Mackenzie, Maurizio Pocchiari, Colin Smith, Inga Zerr, Suvankar Pal
    Nature Reviews Neurology.2021; 17(6): 362.     CrossRef
  • Case series of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a third-level hospital in Quito
    Germaine Eleanor Torres Herrán, Andrés Damián Ortega Herrera, Braulio Martinez Burbano, Marcos Serrano-Dueñas, María Angélica Ortiz Yepez, Raúl Alberto Barrera Madera, Luis Alfredo Masabanda Campaña, Guillermo David Baño Jiménez, Denny Maritza Santos Salt
    BMC Neurology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Evaluation of Rapidly Progressive Dementia Culminating in a Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt–Jakob Disease
    Parmvir Parmar, Curtis L. Cooper, Daniel Kobewka
    Case Reports in Infectious Diseases.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • Diffusion-weighted MRI abnormalities antedate the onset of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
    Keisuke Suzuki, Akiko Kawasaki, Takahide Nagashima, Koichi Hirata
    Neurology.2016; 87(8): 843.     CrossRef
Suppression of Myoclonus in Corticobasal Degeneration by Levetiracetam
Jae Wook Cho, Jae Hyeok Lee
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):28-30.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14007
  • 9,058 View
  • 95 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Myoclonus in corticobasal degeneration (CBD) has often been associated with severe and difficult to treat disabilities. Levetiracetam is a new antiepileptic agent with antimyoclonic effects. Herein, we present a 72-year-old woman with clinically probable CBD and with spontaneous rhythmic myoclonus in the right foot, which was markedly ameliorated through treatment with levetiracetam. The effect of levetiracetam was associated with the decreased amplitude of enlarged cortical somatosensory evoked potentials. This result suggests that the antimyoclonic effect of levetiracetam might be mediated through the suppression of increased cortical excitability.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Chinese nutraceuticals and physical activity; their role in neurodegenerative tauopathies
    Abdullahi Alausa, Sunday Ogundepo, Barakat Olaleke, Rofiat Adeyemi, Mercy Olatinwo, Aminat Ismail
    Chinese Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Four-Repeat Tauopathies: Current Management and Future Treatments
    Lawren VandeVrede, Peter A. Ljubenkov, Julio C. Rojas, Ariane E. Welch, Adam L. Boxer
    Neurotherapeutics.2020; 17(4): 1563.     CrossRef
  • Physiology-Based Treatment of Myoclonus
    Ashley B. Pena, John N. Caviness
    Neurotherapeutics.2020; 17(4): 1665.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacological interventions in corticobasal degeneration: a review
    Leonardo Caixeta, Victor de Melo Caixeta, Yanley Lucio Nogueira, Tales Alexandre Aversi-Ferreira
    Dementia & Neuropsychologia.2020; 14(3): 243.     CrossRef
  • Available and future treatments for atypical parkinsonism. A systematic review
    Davide Vito Moretti
    CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.2019; 25(2): 159.     CrossRef
  • An Update on Myoclonus Management
    Christine M. Stahl, Steven J. Frucht
    Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.2019; 19(4): 325.     CrossRef
  • Corticobasal degeneration: key emerging issues
    F. Ali, K. A. Josephs
    Journal of Neurology.2018; 265(2): 439.     CrossRef
  • Focal Predominant Forms of Posthypoxic Action Myoclonus
    Carmen Gasca-Salas, Anthony E. Lang
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2016; 3(4): 417.     CrossRef
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration: Pathophysiology and Treatment Options
    Ruth Lamb, Jonathan D. Rohrer, Andrew J. Lees, Huw R. Morris
    Current Treatment Options in Neurology.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Update and Review of the Treatment of Myoclonus
    Kelly Mills, Zoltan Mari
    Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
Unilateral Negative Myoclonus Caused by Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis
Jin-Mo Park, Jin-Sung Park, Yong-Won Kim, Ho-Won Lee, Da-In Lee, Sung-Pa Park, Hyun Seok Song
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(1):49-52.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11009
  • 24,876 View
  • 52 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Various neurologic manifestations of herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis have been reported on the literatures. Chorea, ballism, choreoathetosis and myoclonus were reported as movement disorders which might be related with brain lesion by HSV encephalitis, but negative myoclonus (NM) has never been reported before. NM can be characterized as a shock-like involuntary jerky movement caused by a sudden, brief interruption of muscle activity. We experienced a case of HSV encephalitis with NM in unilateral arm and leg. In polygraphic monitoring, electroencephalography (EMG) silent periods are 50–250 ms in duration with no detectable EMG correlate.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Myoclonus in the critically ill: Diagnosis, management, and clinical impact
    Raoul Sutter, Anette Ristic, Stephan Rüegg, Peter Fuhr
    Clinical Neurophysiology.2016; 127(1): 67.     CrossRef
  • Chorée aiguë après encéphalite herpétique : réplication virale ou mécanisme immunologique ?
    H. Benrhouma, A. Nasri, I. Kraoua, H. Klaa, I. Turki, N. Gouider-Khouja
    Archives de Pédiatrie.2015; 22(9): 961.     CrossRef
Original Article
Four Cases with Peripheral Trauma Induced Involuntary Movements
Eun Joo Chung, Sang Jin Kim, Won Yong Lee, Jong Seok Bae, Eung Gyu Kim, Sung Hwa Pang
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(2):39-41.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10010
  • 8,229 View
  • 51 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose

Although peripheral trauma induced movement disorders have been rarely reported, diagnostic criteria for peripherally induced movement disorders (PIMD) have been established. Because preexisting subclinical movement disorders, or secondary gain for compensation and legal purposes are difficult to confirm, differential diagnosis for physicians still remains difficult.

Case Reports

We present four patients developed movement disorders after relatively various intervals after traffic accident. Three patients of them showed tremor and one patient presented propriospinal myoclonus. In this report, we investigate whether peripheral trauma can lead to movement disorders and describe the relationship between peripheral injury and movement disorders in four cases.

Conclusions

Injury was serious enough to develop involuntary abnormal movements with pain and the latency between injury and the onset of movements in all of cases was less than 1 year. Thus, our cases showed temporal and anatomical correlation between injury and the onset of movement disorder, strongly supporting the cause-and-effect relationship by previous diagnostic criteria for peripherally induced movement disorders.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Propriospinal myoclonus: The spectrum of clinical and neurophysiological phenotypes
    E. Antelmi, F. Provini
    Sleep Medicine Reviews.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Adult Onset Familial Cherry-Red Spot Myoclonus
Chi Kyung Kim, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(1):50-52.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09014
  • 17,750 View
  • 53 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

We report a case of a 36-year-old woman with progressive generalized myoclonus that first became apparent 9 years ago. Her younger brother had similar problems. Examination of her eyes revealed cherry-red spots. Hexosaminidase A, β-galactosidase and neuraminidase activity were normal. Although the laboratory findings were negative, cherry-red spots, progressive myoclonus and autosomal recessive inheritance pattern suggested that she had an unknown type of lysosomal storage disease.

Review Article
Electrophysiologic Assessments of Involuntary Movements: Tremor and Myoclonus
Hyun-Dong Park, Hee-Tae Kim
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(1):14-17.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09004
  • 11,092 View
  • 181 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Tremor is defined as a rhythmical, involuntary oscillatory movement of a body part. Although neurological examination reveals information regarding its frequency, regularity, amplitude, and activation conditions, the electrophysiological investigations help in confirming the tremor, in differentiating it from other hyperkinetic disorders like myoclonus, and may provide etiological clues. Accelerometer with surface electromyogram (EMG) can be used to document the dominant frequency of a tremor, which may be useful as certain frequencies are more characteristic of specific etiologies than others hyperkinetic disorders. It may show rhythmic bursts, duration and activation pattern (alternating or synchronous). Myoclonus is a quick, involuntary movement. Electrophysiological studies may helpful in the evaluation of myoclonus, not only for confirming the clinical diagnosis but also for understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms. Electroencephalogram (EEG)-EMG correlates can give us important information about myoclonus. Jerk-locked back-averaging and evoked potentials with recording of the long-latency, long-loop reflexes are currently available to study the pathophysiology of myoclonus.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Posthypoxic Segmental Spinal “Flutter”-Like Myoclonus
    BobyV Maramattom
    Neurology India.2022; 70(5): 2202.     CrossRef
  • The diagnostic value of clinical neurophysiology in hyperkinetic movement disorders: A systematic review
    S. van der Veen, M.R. Klamer, J.W.J. Elting, J.H.T.M. Koelman, A.M.M. van der Stouwe, M.A.J. Tijssen
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 89: 176.     CrossRef
  • How can neurophysiological studies help with movement disorders characterization in clinical practice? A review
    Talyta GRIPPE, Natalia Spinola Costa da CUNHA, Pedro Renato de Paula BRANDÃO, Rubens Nelson Morato FERNANDEZ, Francisco Eduardo Costa CARDOSO
    Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria.2020; 78(8): 512.     CrossRef
  • Epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysmal motor phenomena in newborns
    Carlotta Facini, Carlotta Spagnoli, Francesco Pisani
    The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine.2016; 29(22): 3652.     CrossRef
Case Report
Involuntary Scapular Movements as a Possible Manifestation of Radicular Myoclonus
Bosuk Park, Sook Keun Song, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2008;1(2):104-106.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.08021
  • 7,511 View
  • 41 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Radicular myoclonus (RM) is a kind of peripheral myoclonus exclusively related with traumatic spinal root lesion. Here we describe a case with involuntary scapular movements as a possible manifestation of RM. A 37-year-old woman without any underlying disease developedinvoluntary movements of left shoulder two days after cervical trauma. On needle electromyographic recordings, the myoclonic jerky movements were found in left serratus anterior and rhomboid major muscles, and the duration of bursts ranged from 100 to 300 ms with the irregular frequency of 1–2 Hz. Electromyography studies showed accompanying left C5 radiculopathy. Treatment with clonazepm markedly improved involuntary scapular movements.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders