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Review Article
Current Status and Future Perspectives on Stem Cell-Based Therapies for Parkinson’s Disease
Young Cha, Tae-Yoon Park, Pierre Leblanc, Kwang-Soo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(1):22-41.   Published online January 12, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22141
  • 6,093 View
  • 463 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, affecting 1%–2% of the population over the age of 65. As the population ages, it is anticipated that the burden on society will significantly escalate. Although symptom reduction by currently available pharmacological and/or surgical treatments improves the quality of life of many PD patients, there are no treatments that can slow down, halt, or reverse disease progression. Because the loss of a specific cell type, midbrain dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, is the main cause of motor dysfunction in PD, it is considered a promising target for cell replacement therapy. Indeed, numerous preclinical and clinical studies using fetal cell transplantation have provided proof of concept that cell replacement therapy may be a viable therapeutic approach for PD. However, the use of human fetal cells remains fraught with controversy due to fundamental ethical, practical, and clinical limitations. Groundbreaking work on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, coupled with extensive basic research in the stem cell field offers promising potential for hPSC-based cell replacement to become a realistic treatment regimen for PD once several major issues can be successfully addressed. In this review, we will discuss the prospects and challenges of hPSC-based cell therapy for PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • RNA-based controllers for engineering gene and cell therapies
    Kei Takahashi, Kate E Galloway
    Current Opinion in Biotechnology.2024; 85: 103026.     CrossRef
  • Precision Medicine in Parkinson's Disease Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
    Min Seong Kim, Hyesoo Kim, Gabsang Lee
    Advanced Healthcare Materials.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A recent update on drugs and alternative approaches for parkinsonism
    Sneha Kispotta, Debajyoti Das, Shakti Ketan Prusty
    Neuropeptides.2024; 104: 102415.     CrossRef
  • Recent Research Trends in Neuroinflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disorders
    Jessica Cohen, Annette Mathew, Kirk D. Dourvetakis, Estella Sanchez-Guerrero, Rajendra P. Pangeni, Narasimman Gurusamy, Kristina K. Aenlle, Geeta Ravindran, Assma Twahir, Dylan Isler, Sara Rukmini Sosa-Garcia, Axel Llizo, Alison C. Bested, Theoharis C. Th
    Cells.2024; 13(6): 511.     CrossRef
  • Continuous immunosuppression is required for suppressing immune responses to xenografts in non-human primate brains
    Su Feng, Ting Zhang, Zhengxiao He, Wenchang Zhang, Yingying Chen, Chunmei Yue, Naihe Jing
    Cell Regeneration.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The role of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases: current understanding and future therapeutic targets
    Alhamdu Adamu, Shuo Li, Fankai Gao, Guofang Xue
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Potential for Therapeutic-Loaded Exosomes to Ameliorate the Pathogenic Effects of α-Synuclein in Parkinson’s Disease
    David J. Rademacher
    Biomedicines.2023; 11(4): 1187.     CrossRef
  • Neural Stem Cell Therapies: Promising Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases
    Amir Gholamzad, Hadis Sadeghi, Maryam Azizabadi Farahani, Ali Faraji, Mahya Rostami, Sajad Khonche, Shirin Kamrani, Mahsa Khatibi, Omid Moeini, Seyed Armit Hosseini, Mohammadmatin Nourikhani, Mehrdad Gholamzad
    Neurology Letters.2023; 2(2): 55.     CrossRef
  • Should continuous dopaminergic stimulation be a standard of care in advanced Parkinson’s disease?
    Z. Pirtošek, V. Leta, P. Jenner, M. Vérin
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2023; 130(11): 1395.     CrossRef
Original Article
Nationwide Survey of Patient Knowledge and Attitudes towards Human Experimentation Using Stem Cells or Bee Venom Acupuncture for Parkinson’s Disease
Sun Ju Chung, Seong Beom Koh, Young-Su Ju, Jae Woo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(2):84-91.   Published online October 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14012
  • 16,847 View
  • 87 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective Stem cell treatment is a well-recognized experimental treatment among patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), for which there are high expectations of a positive impact. Acupuncture with bee venom is one of the most popular complementary and alternative treatments for PD. Patient knowledge and attitudes towards these experimental treatments are unknown.
Methods Using a 12-item questionnaire, a nationwide survey was conducted of 963 PD patients and 267 caregivers in 44 Korean Movement Disorders Society member hospitals from April 2013 to June 2013. The survey was performed by trained interviewers using conventional methods.
Results Regarding questions on experimental treatments using stem cells or bee venom acupuncture, 5.1–17.7% of PD patients answered questions on safety, efficacy, and evidence-based practice incorrectly; however, more than half responded that they did not know the correct answer. Although safety and efficacy have not been established, 55.5% of PD patients responded that they were willing to receive stem cell treatment. With regard to participating in experimental treatments, there was a strong correlation between stem cell treatment and bee venom acupuncture (p < 0.0001, odds ratio = 5.226, 95% confidence interval 3.919–6.969). Younger age, higher education, and a longer duration of PD were all associated with a correct understanding of experimental treatments.
Conclusions Our data suggest that relatively few PD patients correctly understand the safety and efficacy of experimental treatments and that PD patients are greatly interested in new treatments. We hope that our data will be used to educate or to plan educational programs for PD patients and caregivers.

Citations

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  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Bee Venom Acupuncture Therapy on Rheumatoid Arthritis Among Patients in Saudi Arabia
    Shahd E Sharaf, Safaa Alsanosi, Abdullah R Alzahrani, Saeed S Al-Ghamdi, Sharaf E Sharaf, Nahla Ayoub
    International Journal of General Medicine.2022; Volume 15: 1171.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Patient and Expert Perceptions of the Attainment of Research Milestones in Parkinson's Disease
    Patrick Bodilly Kane, Daniel M. Benjamin, Roger A. Barker, Anthony E. Lang, Todd Sherer, Jonathan Kimmelman
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(1): 171.     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of patient and public perspectives on cell and gene therapies
    Karen Macpherson, Olalekan Lee Aiyegbusi, Lauren Elston, Susan Myles, Jennifer Washington, Nisha Sungum, Mark Briggs, Philip Newsome, Melanie Calvert
    Regenerative Medicine.2021; 16(11): 1005.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Applications of Bee Venom Acupoint Injection
    Ting-Yen Lin, Ching-Liang Hsieh
    Toxins.2020; 12(10): 618.     CrossRef
  • Patient and public perspectives on cell and gene therapies: a systematic review
    Olalekan Lee Aiyegbusi, Karen Macpherson, Lauren Elston, Susan Myles, Jennifer Washington, Nisha Sungum, Mark Briggs, Philip N. Newsome, Melanie J. Calvert
    Nature Communications.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of Parkinson's disease: A cross-sectional survey of Asian patients
    Onanong Jitkritsadakul, Nonglak Boonrod, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2017; 374: 69.     CrossRef
  • Attitudes to Stem Cell Therapy Among Ischemic Stroke Survivors in the Lund Stroke Recovery Study
    Joseph Aked, Hossein Delavaran, Olle Lindvall, Bo Norrving, Zaal Kokaia, Arne Lindgren
    Stem Cells and Development.2017; 26(8): 566.     CrossRef
  • Professional ethics in complementary and alternative medicines in management of Parkinson’s disease
    Hee Jin Kim, Beomseok Jeon, Sun Ju Chung
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2016; 6(4): 675.     CrossRef
Review Article
Cell Therapy Strategies vs. Paracrine Effect in Huntington’s Disease
Wooseok Im, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):1-6.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14001
  • 14,016 View
  • 88 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder. The most common symptom of HD is abnormal involuntary writhing movements, called chorea. Antipsychotics and tetrabenazine are used to alleviate the signs and symptoms of HD. Stem cells have been investigated for use in neurodegenerative disorders to develop cell therapy strategies. Recent evidence indicates that the beneficial effects of stem cell therapies are actually mediated by secretory molecules, as well as cell replacement. Although stem cell studies show that cell transplantation provides cellular improvement around lesions in in vivo models, further work is required to elucidate some issues before the clinical application of stem cells. These issues include the precise mechanism of action, delivery method, toxicity and safety. With a focus on HD, this review summarizes cell therapy strategies and the paracrine effect of stem cells.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Current Understanding of Stem Cell and Secretome Therapies in Liver Diseases
    Dongkyu Kim, Gun-Sik Cho, Choongseong Han, Dong-Hyuk Park, Hee-Kyung Park, Dong-Hun Woo, Jong-Hoon Kim
    Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.2017; 14(6): 653.     CrossRef
  • Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Huntington’s Disease: Disease Modeling and the Potential for Cell-Based Therapy
    Ling Liu, Jin-Sha Huang, Chao Han, Guo-Xin Zhang, Xiao-Yun Xu, Yan Shen, Jie Li, Hai-Yang Jiang, Zhi-Cheng Lin, Nian Xiong, Tao Wang
    Molecular Neurobiology.2016; 53(10): 6698.     CrossRef
  • Stem Cells in Neurological Disorders: Emerging Therapy with Stunning Hopes
    Ghanshyam Upadhyay, Sharmila Shankar, Rakesh K. Srivastava
    Molecular Neurobiology.2015; 52(1): 610.     CrossRef
  • Genome Modification Leads to Phenotype Reversal in Human Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cells
    Guangbin Xia, Yuanzheng Gao, Shouguang Jin, S.H. Subramony, Naohiro Terada, Laura P.W. Ranum, Maurice S. Swanson, Tetsuo Ashizawa
    Stem Cells.2015; 33(6): 1829.     CrossRef
  • Glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition enhanced proliferation, migration and functional re-endothelialization of endothelial progenitor cells in hypercholesterolemia microenvironment
    Bin Cui, Jun Jin, Xiaohan Ding, Mengyang Deng, Shiyong Yu, MingBao Song, Yang Yu, Xiaohui Zhao, Jianfei Chen, Lan Huang
    Experimental Biology and Medicine.2015; 240(12): 1752.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders