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6 "positron emission tomography"
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Original Article
Nonmotor and Dopamine Transporter Change in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder by Olfactory Impairment
Jee-Young Lee, Eun Jin Yoon, Yu Kyeong Kim, Chae Won Shin, Hyunwoo Nam, Jae Min Jeong, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(2):103-112.   Published online May 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18061
  • 4,755 View
  • 179 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
It is unclear whether the decline in dopamine transporters (DAT) differs among idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) patients with different levels of olfactory impairment. This study aimed to characterize DAT changes in relation to nonmotor features in iRBD patients by olfactory loss.
Methods
This prospective cohort study consisted of three age-matched groups: 30 polysomnography-confirmed iRBD patients, 30 drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease patients, and 19 healthy controls without olfactory impairment. The iRBD group was divided into two groups based on olfactory testing results. Participants were evaluated for reported prodromal markers and then underwent 18F-FP-CIT positron emission tomography and 3T MRI. Tracer uptakes were analyzed in the caudate, anterior and posterior putamen, substantia nigra, and raphe nuclei.
Results
Olfactory impairment was defined in 38.5% of iRBD patients. Mild parkinsonian signs and cognitive functions were not different between the two iRBD subgroups; however, additional prodromal features, constipation, and urinary and sexual dysfunctions were found in iRBD patients with olfactory impairment but not in those without. Tracer uptake showed significant group differences in all brain regions, except the raphe nuclei. The iRBD patients with olfactory impairment had uptake reductions in the anterior and posterior putamen, caudate, and substantia nigra (p < 0.016 in all, adjusted for age), which ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 of age-normative values. In contrast, those without olfactory impairment had insignificant changes in all regions ranging above 0.8.
Conclusion
There was a clear distinction in DAT loss and nonmotor profiles by olfactory status in iRBD.
Review Article
Tau Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Degenerative Parkinsonisms
Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Hanna Cho, Jae Yong Choi, Young Hoon Ryu, Myung Sik Lee
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(1):1-12.   Published online January 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17071
  • 8,893 View
  • 411 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In recent years, several radiotracers that selectively bind to pathological tau proteins have been developed. Evidence is emerging that binding patterns of in vivo tau positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients closely resemble the distribution patterns of known neurofibrillary tangle pathology, with the extent of tracer binding reflecting the clinical and pathological progression of AD. In Lewy body diseases (LBD), tau PET imaging has clearly revealed cortical tau burden with a distribution pattern distinct from AD and increased cortical binding within the LBD spectrum. In progressive supranuclear palsy, the globus pallidus and midbrain have shown increased binding most prominently. Tau PET patterns in patients with corticobasal syndrome are characterized by asymmetrical uptake in the motor cortex and underlying white matter, as well as in the basal ganglia. Even in the patients with multiple system atrophy, which is basically a synucleinopathy, 18F-flortaucipir, a widely used tau PET tracer, also binds to the atrophic posterior putamen, possibly due to off-target binding. These distinct patterns of tau-selective radiotracer binding in the various degenerative parkinsonisms suggest its utility as a potential imaging biomarker for the differential diagnosis of parkinsonisms.
Original Article
Reorganization of the Human Somatosensory Cortex in Hand Dystonia
Maria Jose Catalan, Kenji Ishii, William Bara-Jimenez, Mark Hallett
J Mov Disord. 2012;5(1):5-8.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.12002
  • 7,425 View
  • 52 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose:

Abnormalities of finger representations in the somatosensory cortex have been identified in patients with focal hand dystonia. Measuring blood flow with positron emission tomography (PET) can be use to demonstrate functional localization of receptive fields.

Methods:

A vibratory stimulus was applied to the right thumb and little finger of six healthy volunteers and six patients with focal hand dystonia to map their receptive fields using H215O PET.

Results:

The cortical finger representations in the primary somatosensory cortex were closer to each other in patients than in normal subjects. No abnormalities were found in secondary somatosensory cortex, but the somatotopy there is less well distinguished.

Conclusions:

These data confirm prior electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging observations showing abnormalities of finger representations in somatosensory cortex of patients with focal hand dystonia.

Case Report
Preserved Glucose Metabolism of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in a Case of Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Study
Oh Dae Kwon, Chang-Seok Ki
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(2):51-53.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10014
  • 18,889 View
  • 34 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

The cerebellar glucose metabolism of multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C) is known to be decreased but is not defined among areas of cerebellum. We encountered a 54-year-old man who developed dizziness and progressive ataxia followed by urinary incontinence and orthostatic hypotension, all of those symptoms progressed relentlessly and the symptoms responded poorly to levodopa therapy. Visual analysis and statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed hypometabolism of both cerebellar hemisphere, severe at cortical area, and pons. There was clear sparing of deep cerebellar nuclei. Our report, as we know, shows the first case of preserved glucose metabolism of deep cerebellar nuclei relative to cerebellar cortex in an MSA-C patient.

Original Articles
Comparison of Cerebral Glucose Metabolism between Possible and Probable Multiple System Atrophy
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Jae Seung Kim, Ki Chun Im, Myoung Chong Lee, Sun Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(1):22-28.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09006
  • 8,533 View
  • 80 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background:

To investigate the relationship between presenting clinical manifestations and imaging features of multisystem neuronal dysfunction in MSA patients, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET).

Methods:

We studied 50 consecutive MSA patients with characteristic brain MRI findings of MSA, including 34 patients with early MSA-parkinsonian (MSA-P) and 16 with early MSA-cerebellar (MSA-C). The cerebral glucose metabolism of all MSA patients was evaluated in comparison with 25 age-matched controls. 18F-FDG PET results were assessed by the Statistic Parametric Mapping (SPM) analysis and the regions of interest (ROI) method.

Results:

The mean time from disease onset to 18F-FDG PET was 25.9±13.0 months in 34 MSA-P patients and 20.1±11.1 months in 16 MSA-C patients. Glucose metabolism of the putamen showed a greater decrease in possible MSA-P than in probable MSA-P (p=0.031). Although the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS) score did not differ between possible MSA-P and probable MSA-P, the subscores of rigidity (p=0.04) and bradykinesia (p= 0.008) were significantly higher in possible MSA-P than in probable MSA-P. Possible MSA-C showed a greater decrease in glucose metabolism of the cerebellum than probable MSA-C (p=0.016).

Conclusions:

Our results may suggest that the early neuropathological pattern of possible MSA with a predilection for the striatonigral or olivopontocerebellar system differs from that of probable MSA, which has prominent involvement of the autonomic nervous system in addition to the striatonigral or olivopontocerebellar system.

Relationship Between the Striatal and Cerebellar Glucose Metabolism and the Response to Levodopa Treatment in Patients With Multiple System Atrophy
Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Seung Hun Oh, Ki Ook Lee, Seung Yeob Lee, Young Hoon Ryu, Myung Sik Lee
J Mov Disord. 2008;1(1):26-32.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.08005
  • 9,334 View
  • 53 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Introduction:

About two thirds of the patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) do not respond to levodopa treatment. Postmortem pathological studies and one retrospective [18F]-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDGPET) study attributed such poor response to the striatal degeneration. We prospectively investigated the relationship between levodopa responsiveness and the metabolic activities of the striatum and cerebellum in MSA patients.

Methods:

In 39 patients with MSA, the UPDRS motor score was assessed and two sets of timed motor tests were perform ed before and after the levodopa treatment. After quantitative FDG PET and baseline evaluation, treatment w as started with 3 tablets of Sinemet® 25/250 mg a day. Clinical assessments were performed monthly for three months. Metabolic activities of the caudate, anterior putamen, posterior putamen, cerebellar cortex and cerebellar vermis were measured. We compared the measurements with mean percentage changes of motor function. Also, using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis, we tried to find brain areas in which metabolism correlated with the clinical changes.

Results:

Mean percentage improvements of UPDRS motor scores w ere correlated with glucose metabolism in the posterior putamen and cerebellar vermis. The mean percentage improvements of performance in Purdue peg board test correlated with the glucose metabolism in the cerebellar cortex and vermis. In SPM analysis, cerebellar glucose metabolism correlated with the improvement of UPDRS motor score and the performance of two timed motor tests.

Conclusion:

The integrity of cerebellum, as well as posterior putamen, may be an important factor for showing the response to levodopa.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders