Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
133 "Parkinson’s disease"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Association between exposure to particulate matter and incidence of Parkinson's disease: A nationwide cohort study in Taiwan
Ting-Bin Chen, Chih-Sung Liang, Ching-Mao Chang, Cheng-Chia Yang, Hwa-Lung Yu, Yuh-Shen Wu, Winn-Jung Huang, I-Ju Tsai, Yuan-Horng Yan, Cheng-Yu Wei, Chun-Pai Yang
Received January 2, 2024  Accepted June 18, 2024  Published online June 18, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24003    [Accepted]
  • 335 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Emerging evidence suggests that air pollution exposure may increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We aimed to investigate the association between exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and the risk of incident PD nationwide.
Methods
We utilized data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, which was spatiotemporally linked with air quality data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration website. The study population consisted of participants who were followed from the index date (January 1st, 2005) until the occurrence of PD or the end of the study period (December 31st, 2017). Participants who had a prior diagnosis of PD before the index date were excluded. To evaluate the association between exposure to PM2.5 and incident PD, we employed a Cox regression to estimate the hazard ratio with a 95% confidence interval (CI).
Results
A total of 454,583 participants were included, with a mean (SD) age of 63.1 (9.9) years and a male proportion of 50%. Over a mean follow-up period of 11.1 (3.6) years, 4% of the participants (n = 18,862) developed PD. We observed a significant positive association between PM2.5 exposure and the risk of PD, with a hazard ratio of 1.22 (95% CI, 1.20–1.23) per interquartile range increase in exposure (10.17 μg/m3) when adjusting for both SO2 and NO2.
Conclusion
We provide further evidence of an association between PM2.5 exposure and risk of PD. These findings underscore the urgent need for public health policies aimed at reducing ambient air pollution and its potential impact on PD.
Fatigue in PD is due to decreased efficiency of the frontal network: quantitative EEG analysis
Min Seung Kim, SangUk Park, Ukeob Park, Seung Wan Kang, Suk Yun Kang
Received February 17, 2024  Accepted June 5, 2024  Published online June 10, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24038    [Accepted]
  • 227 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Fatigue is a common, debilitating non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD), but its mechanism is poorly understood. We aimed to determine whether electroencephalography (EEG) could measure fatigue objectively and to expound on the pathophysiology of fatigue in PD.
Methods
We studied 32 de novo PD patients who underwent electroencephalography (EEG). We compared brain activity between 19 PD patients without fatigue and 13 PD patients with fatigue via EEG power spectrum and graph including global efficiency (GE), characteristic path length (CPL), clustering coefficient (CCO), small worldness (SW), local efficiency (LE), degree centrality (DC), closeness centrality (CCE), and betweenness centrality (BC).
Results
No significant differences in absolute and relative powers were seen between PD without and with fatigue (all ps > 0.02, Bonferroni-corrected). In network analysis, the brain network efficiency differed by frequency band. Generally, the brain network in the frontal area for theta and delta bands showed greater efficiency, and in the temporal area, the alpha1 band was less efficient in PD without fatigue (p= 0.0000, p = 0.0011, ps ≤ 0.0007, respectively, Bonferroni-corrected).
Conclusions
Our study suggests that PD patients with fatigue have less efficient networks in the frontal area compared with networks of those with PD without fatigue. These findings may explain why fatigue is common in PD, a frontostriatal disorder. Increased efficiency in the temporal area in PD with fatigue is assumed to be compensation. Brain network analysis using graph theory is more valuable than power spectrum analysis in revealing the brain mechanism related to fatigue.
Review Article
α-Synuclein: A Promising Biomarker for Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders
Taku Hatano, Ayami Okuzumi, Gen Matsumoto, Taiji Tsunemi, Nobutaka Hattori
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):127-137.   Published online April 9, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24075
  • 2,025 View
  • 275 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mutations in the SNCA gene, which encodes α-synuclein (α-syn), play a key role in the development of genetic Parkinson’s disease (PD). α-Syn is a major component of Lewy bodies in PD and glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients often progress to PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, or MSA, which are collectively known as α-synucleinopathies. The loss of dopaminergic neurons with Lewy bodies precedes motor dysfunction in these diseases, but the mechanisms of neurodegeneration due to α-syn aggregation are poorly understood. Monitoring α-syn aggregation in vivo could serve as a diagnostic biomarker and help elucidate pathogenesis, necessitating a simple and accurate detection method. Seed amplification assays (SAAs), such as real-time quaking-induced conversion and protein misfolding cyclic amplification, are used to detect small amounts of abnormally structured α-syn protofibrils, which are central to aggregation. These methods are promising for the early diagnosis of α-synucleinopathy. Differences in α-syn filament structures between α-synucleinopathies, as observed through transmission electron microscopy and cryo-electron microscopy, suggest their role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. SAAs may differentiate between subtypes of α-synucleinopathy and other diseases. Efforts are also being made to identify α-syn from blood using various methods. This review introduces body fluid α-syn biomarkers based on pathogenic α-syn seeds, which are expected to redefine α-synucleinopathy diagnosis and staging, improving clinical research accuracy and facilitating biomarker development.
Brief communication
Evaluating the validity and reliability of the Korean version of Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease–Cognition
Jinse Park, Eung Seok Oh, Seong-Beom Koh, In-Uk Song, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Sang-Myung Cheon, Yun Joong Kim, Jin Whan Cho, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee-Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do Young Kwon, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Ji Sun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hee Jin Kim, Jin Young Hong, Mi-Jung Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Ji Seon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Won Tae Yoon, Sooyeoun You, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Su-Yun Lee, Younsoo Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Joong-Seok Kim, Ji-Young Kim
Received March 8, 2024  Accepted April 2, 2024  Published online April 3, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24061    [Accepted]
  • 659 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease–Cognition (SCOPA-Cog) was developed to screen for cognition in PD. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the SCOPA-cog.
Methods
We recruited 129 PD patients from 31 clinics with movement disorders in South Korea. The original version of the SCOPA-cognition was translated into Korean using the translation-retranslation method. The test-rest method with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient were used to assess reliability. The Spearman’s Rank correlation analysis with Montreal Cognitive Assessment-Korean version (MOCA-K) and Korean Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were used to assess concurrent validity.
Results
The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.797, and the ICC was 0.887. Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed a significant correlation with the K-MMSE and MOCA-K scores (r = 0.546 and r = 0.683, respectively).
Conclusions
Our results demonstrate that K-SCOPA-Cog exhibits good reliability and validity.
Original Articles
Trends in Physiotherapy Interventions and Medical Costs for Parkinson’s Disease in South Korea, 2011–2020
Dong-Woo Ryu, Jinse Park, Myung Jun Lee, Dallah Yoo, Sang-Myung Cheon
Received December 22, 2023  Accepted March 18, 2024  Published online March 19, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23269    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 599 View
  • 54 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Physiotherapy (PT), which is an effective strategy for managing Parkinson’s disease (PD), can influence health care utilization. We analyzed trends in health care utilization, PT interventions, and medical costs among patients with PD.
Methods
Using data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service from 2011 to 2020, we analyzed the number of patients with PD and their health care utilization and assessed the odds ratio (OR) for receiving regular PTs.
Results
Over 10 years, 169,613 patients with PD were included in the analysis. The number of patients with PD increased annually from 49,417 in 2011 to 91,841 in 2020. The number of patients with PD receiving PT increased from 4,847 (9.81%) in 2011 to 13,163 (14.33%) in 2020, and the number of PT prescriptions increased from 81,220 in 2011 to 377,651 in 2019. Medical costs per patient with PD increased from 1,686 United States dollars (USD) in 2011 to 3,202 USD in 2020. The medical expenses for each patient with PD receiving PT increased from 6,582 USD in 2011 to 13,475 USD in 2020. Moreover, regular PTs were administered to 31,782 patients (18.74%) and were administered only through hospitalization. Those patients in their 50s with disabilities demonstrated a high OR for regular PTs, whereas those aged 80 years or older and residing outside of Seoul had a low OR.
Conclusion
The PD burden increased in South Korea between 2011 and 2020, as did health care utilization and medical costs. A significant increase in medical expenses can be associated with increased PD incidence and PT interventions. Regular PT applications remain restricted and have barriers to access.
Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels and Longitudinal Motor and Cognitive Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease Patients
Ko-Eun Choi, Dong-Woo Ryu, Yoon-Sang Oh, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):198-207.   Published online March 6, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23264
  • 992 View
  • 42 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus have been identified as poor prognostic factors for motor and nonmotor outcomes in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), although there is some controversy with this finding. In the present study, we investigated the effects of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels on longitudinal motor and cognitive outcomes in PD patients.
Methods
We included a total of 201 patients who were diagnosed with PD between January 2015 and January 2020. The patients were categorized based on FPG level into euglycemia (70 mg/dL < FPG < 100 mg/dL), intermediate glycemia (100 mg/dL ≤ FPG < 126 mg/dL), and hyperglycemia (FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL), and longitudinal FPG trajectories were analyzed using group-based trajectory modeling. Survival analysis was conducted to determine the time until motor outcome (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥ 2) and the conversion from normal cognition to mild cognitive impairment.
Results
Among the patient cohort, 82 had euglycemia, 93 had intermediate glycemia, and 26 had hyperglycemia. Intermediate glycemia (hazard ratio 1.747, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.083–2.816, p = 0.0221) and hyperglycemia (hazard ratio 3.864, 95% CI 1.996–7.481, p < 0.0001) were found to be significant predictors of worsening motor symptoms. However, neither intermediate glycemia (hazard ratio 1.183, 95% CI 0.697–2.009, p = 0.5339) nor hyperglycemia (hazard ratio 1.297, 95% CI 0.601–2.800, p = 0.5078) demonstrated associations with the longitudinal progression of cognitive impairment. Diabetes mellitus, defined by self-reported medical history, was not related to poor motor or cognitive impairment outcomes.
Conclusion
Our results suggest that both impaired glucose tolerance and hyperglycemia could be associated with motor progression in PD patients.
Effectiveness of Live-Streaming Tele-Exercise Intervention in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Study
Jongmok Ha, Jung Hyun Park, Jun Seok Lee, Hye Young Kim, Ji One Song, Jiwon Yoo, Jong Hyeon Ahn, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):189-197.   Published online February 29, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23251
  • 1,359 View
  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Exercise can improve both motor and nonmotor symptoms in people with Parkinson’s disease (PwP), but there is an unmet need for accessible and sustainable exercise options. This study aimed to evaluate the effect, feasibility, and safety of a regularly performed live-streaming tele-exercise intervention for PwP.
Methods
A live-streaming exercise intervention for PwP was implemented twice a week for 12 weeks. We measured the motor and nonmotor symptom scores of the included patients before and after the intervention. Changes in clinical scores from baseline to postintervention were analyzed using paired t-tests. Factors associated with improvements in clinical scores and compliance were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation analysis.
Results
Fifty-six participants were enrolled in the study. There were significant improvements in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)-anxiety (p = 0.007), HADS-depression (p < 0.001), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III (p < 0.001), UPDRS total (p = 0.015), Hoehn and Yahr stage (p = 0.027), and Parkinson’s Disease Fatigue Scale-16 (p = 0.026) scores after the intervention. Improvements in motor symptoms were associated with improvements in mood symptoms and fatigue. Higher motor impairment at baseline was associated with a greater compliance rate and better postintervention composite motor and nonmotor outcomes (ΔUPDRS total score). Overall, the 12-week tele-exercise program was feasible and safe for PwP. No adverse events were reported. The overall adherence rate was 60.0% in our cohort, and 83.4% of the participants were able to participate in more than half of the exercise routines.
Conclusion
The live-streaming tele-exercise intervention is a safe, feasible, and effective nonpharmacological treatment option that can alleviate fatigue and improve mood and motor symptoms in PwP.
Comparing Montreal Cognitive Assessment Performance in Parkinson’s Disease Patients: Age- and Education-Adjusted Cutoffs vs. Machine Learning
Kyeongmin Baek, Young Min Kim, Han Kyu Na, Junki Lee, Dong Ho Shin, Seok-Jae Heo, Seok Jong Chung, Kiyong Kim, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Jeehee Yoon, Yun Joong Kim
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):171-180.   Published online February 13, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23271
  • 1,170 View
  • 77 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is recommended for general cognitive evaluation in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. However, age- and education-adjusted cutoffs specifically for PD have not been developed or systematically validated across PD cohorts with diverse education levels.
Methods
In this retrospective analysis, we utilized data from 1,293 Korean patients with PD whose cognitive diagnoses were determined through comprehensive neuropsychological assessments. Age- and education-adjusted cutoffs were formulated based on 1,202 patients with PD. To identify the optimal machine learning model, clinical parameters and MoCA domain scores from 416 patients with PD were used. Comparative analyses between machine learning methods and different cutoff criteria were conducted on an additional 91 consecutive patients with PD.
Results
The cutoffs for cognitive impairment decrease with increasing age within the same education level. Similarly, lower education levels within the same age group correspond to lower cutoffs. For individuals aged 60–80 years, cutoffs were set as follows: 25 or 24 years for those with more than 12 years of education, 23 or 22 years for 10–12 years, and 21 or 20 years for 7–9 years. Comparisons between age- and education-adjusted cutoffs and the machine learning method showed comparable accuracies. The cutoff method resulted in a higher sensitivity (0.8627), whereas machine learning yielded higher specificity (0.8250).
Conclusion
Both the age- and education-adjusted cutoff methods and machine learning methods demonstrated high effectiveness in detecting cognitive impairment in PD patients. This study highlights the necessity of tailored cutoffs and suggests the potential of machine learning to improve cognitive assessment in PD patients.
Extraction of the pull force from inertial sensors during the pull test for Parkinson’s disease: A reliability study
Ryoma Taniuchi, Shusaku Kanai, Amane Hara, Kazuya Monden, Hiroaki Nagatani, Tsuyoshi Torii, Toshihide Harada
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):150-157.   Published online December 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23185
  • 1,679 View
  • 169 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To examine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of the pull test in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) using the extracted pull force.
Methods
In this inter- and intra-rater reliability study, two raters performed a pull test on 30 patients with PD. The pull force was quantified using inertial sensors attached to the rater’s right hand and the patient’s lower trunk. In this study, the pull force was calculated as an extracted three-dimensional vector quantity, the resultant acceleration, and was expressed in m/s2. Inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were analyzed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the pull force and Cohen’s weighted kappa (κw) for the pull test score. Furthermore, Bland–Altman analysis was used to investigate systematic errors.
Results
The inter- and intra-rater reliability of the pull force was very poor (ICC = 0.033–0.214). Bland–Altman analysis revealed no systematic errors in the pull forces between the two test points. Conversely, κw for the pull test scores ranged from 0.763 to 0.920, indicating substantial to almost perfect agreement.
Conclusion
The pull test score was reliable despite variations in the quantified pull force for inter- and intra-rater reliability. Our findings suggest that the pull test is a robust tool for evaluating postural instability in patients with PD and that the pull force probably does not affect scoring performance.
Brief communication
Accessibility of Device-Aided Therapies for Persons With Parkinson’s Disease in Poland
Katarzyna Smilowska, Tomasz Pietrzykowski, K. Ray Chaudhuri, Bastiaan R. Bloem, Daniel J. van Wamelen
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):208-212.   Published online November 20, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23172
  • 1,358 View
  • 71 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Access to care for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), particularly to device-aided therapies (DAT), is not equally distributed. The objective was to analyze accessibility to DAT (deep brain stimulation, intraduodenal levodopa pump therapy, and apomorphine pump therapy) in Poland.
Methods
We analyzed the distribution of DAT use in Poland by determining the number of persons with PD receiving one of the three DATs during 2015–2021.
Results
In 2021, the number of persons receiving DAT in Poland was 0.56% of the total PD population, increasing from 0.21% in 2015. Overall, deep brain stimulation was the preferred DAT in Poland, but strong regional differences in the use of the other DATs were observed. Accessibility to DAT was negatively associated with average annual income (p < 0.001).
Conclusion
Access to DAT for persons with PD in Poland is still limited, and strong regional differences in accessibility were observed, although its general increase over the last decade is encouraging.
Original Articles
Parkinson’s Disease, Impulsive-Compulsive Behaviors, and Health-Related Quality of Life
Marie Grall-Bronnec, Audrey Verholleman, Caroline Victorri-Vigneau, Juliette Leboucher, Elsa Thiabaud, Jean-Benoit Hardouin, Benoit Schreck, Tiphaine Rouaud, Monica Roy, Pascal Derkinderen, Gaëlle Challet-Bouju
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):82-88.   Published online November 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23042
  • 1,357 View
  • 155 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
A large body of literature has examined the links between the use of dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the development of “impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs).” Little is known regarding the link between the development of ICBs and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). We aimed to explore the factors that are associated with poorer HRQOL, especially in relation to DRT-induced ICBs, in a sample of PD patients.
Methods
This PARKADD (PARK: PARKinson’s disease; ADD: behavioral ADDictions) study was a prospective case‒control study initially designed to assess the factors associated with ICBs in PD patients. A prospective clinical follow-up was added, aiming to capture the long-term evolution of HRQOL in relation to ICBs occurring or worsening after the beginning of PD. We focused on sociodemographic and PD characteristics and the history or presence of ICBs. HRQOL was measured using the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-8. A multivariate linear regression was performed to identify factors related to poorer HRQOL.
Results
A total of 169 patients were eligible for the follow-up study. The presence of an ICB, a higher levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) and a longer PD duration were significantly associated with poorer HRQOL, with an interaction between LEDD and PD duration.
Conclusion
The presence of an ICB was related to poorer HRQOL and should be considered a crucial factor for the management of PD patients. Several studies were recently published that provide guidelines for the management of these patients, with recommendations based on two key principles: prevention and specific treatment.
Comparative Olfactory Profiles in Parkinson’s Disease and Drug-Induced Parkinsonism
In Hee Kwak, Young Eun Kim, Suk Yun Kang, Joong Seob Lee, Jeongjae Lee, Min Seung Kim, Dong A Yea, Hyeo-il Ma
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):64-70.   Published online October 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23105
  • 1,500 View
  • 177 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) is a frequently encountered diagnostic possibility when considering Parkinson’s disease (PD). While olfactory dysfunction is a common clinical feature in PD, the comparison of olfactory function between the two conditions remains insufficient. This study aimed to compare olfactory function, including threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) profiles, between PD and DIP.
Methods
Consecutive patients with drug-naïve PD (n = 78) or DIP (n = 31) confirmed through dopamine transporter imaging were enrolled in this study. The YSK olfactory function (YOF) test, composed of TDI domains culturally familiar odorants to Koreans, was administered to all patients.
Results
In the study population, patients with DIP were significantly older than patients with PD. Over 70% of patients in each group had hyposmia or anosmia, and there was no significant difference in the occurrence of olfactory dysfunction between the two groups. In addition, there were no differences in the total YOF score and threshold score between the two groups. Meanwhile, the PD group had a significantly lower discrimination and identification score than the DIP group after adjusting for age, sex, the existence of diabetes, disease duration, and cognitive function.
Conclusion
This study demonstrated that detailed olfactory profiles are different in PD and DIP, even though olfactory dysfunction can be observed in both conditions.
Hair Loss: A Well-Known Yet Understudied Symptom in Parkinson’s Disease Patients During Dopaminergic Therapy
Jungyeun Lee, Hwa Jung Ryu, Soon Young Hwang, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):47-54.   Published online September 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23088
  • 1,466 View
  • 152 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Hair loss has been reported to occur during dopaminergic therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which dopaminergic therapy induces hair loss is not well understood. Dopamine receptors are present in the hair follicle, where they regulate melanin production. However, the role of dopamine receptors in hair growth is still not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of hair loss and identify factors associated with complaints of hair loss in patients with Parkinson’s disease.
Methods
A cross-sectional design involving 495 Parkinson’s disease patients was applied to evaluate hair loss status. Patients completed a questionnaire, and scalp/hair examinations were performed. Patients with underlying conditions that could affect hair loss and those prescribed medications known to increase the risk of hair loss were excluded. Finally, 291 patients (58.8%) were included for analysis.
Results
Among the 495 patients, 138 (27.9%) reported hair loss. Interestingly, more than half of the patients who complained of hair loss (79 out of 138) did not utilize treatments such as hair products, massage, dietary modifications, or alopecia medications. Hair inspection by a single investigator revealed objective hair loss in 263 patients (53.1%). An analysis of factors associated with hair loss complaints showed that the intake of dopaminergic medications with a levodopa-equivalent daily dose > 448 mg was associated with complaints of hair loss.
Conclusion
Dopaminergic medication is associated with hair loss complaints in Parkinson’s disease patients.
Brief communication
A Survey of Perspectives on Telemedicine for Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Jae Young Joo, Ji Young Yun, Young Eun Kim, Yu Jin Jung, Ryul Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Woong-Woo Lee, Aryun Kim, Han-Joon Kim
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):89-93.   Published online August 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23130
  • 1,621 View
  • 196 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients often find it difficult to visit hospitals because of motor symptoms, distance to the hospital, or the absence of caregivers. Telemedicine is one way to solve this problem.
Methods
We surveyed 554 PD patients from eight university hospitals in Korea. The questionnaire consisted of the clinical characteristics of the participants, possible teleconferencing methods, and preferences for telemedicine.
Results
A total of 385 patients (70%) expressed interest in receiving telemedicine. Among them, 174 preferred telemedicine whereas 211 preferred in-person visits. The longer the duration of disease, and the longer the time required to visit the hospital, the more patients were interested in receiving telemedicine.
Conclusion
This is the first study on PD patients’ preferences regarding telemedicine in Korea. Although the majority of patients with PD have a positive view of telemedicine, their interest in receiving telemedicine depends on their different circumstances.
Original Article
Cervical proprioception in Parkinson's disease and its correlation with manual dexterity function
Özlem Menevşe, Büşra Kepenek-Varol, Murat Gültekin, Sevil Bilgin
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):295-306.   Published online July 3, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23039
  • 2,450 View
  • 114 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Cervical proprioception plays a crucial role in posture and movement control. This study aimed to determine the relationships of cervical proprioception, cervical muscle strength and endurance with manual dexterity and hand strength in individuals with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
Twenty individuals with PD (mean age: 63.9 years) and 20 healthy individuals as a control group (mean age: 61.9 years) were recruited. Cervical joint position error (JPE), static endurance of neck muscles, activation of deep cervical flexor muscles (Craniocervical Flexion Test, CCFT), manual dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test, PPT), cognitive and motor tasks of the PPT, finger tapping test (FTT), pinch strength, and grip strength were assessed.
Results
Cervical JPE was significantly higher in individuals with PD than in controls (p < 0.05). The strength and endurance of the cervical muscles were significantly decreased in individuals with PD (p < 0.05). Cervical JPE measurements were negatively correlated with PPT, cognitive and motor tasks of the PPT in individuals with PD (all p < 0.05). The endurance of cervical flexor muscles was negatively correlated with PPT and cognitive PPT scores in the PD group (p < 0.05). In addition, a significant positive correlation was found between cervical flexor endurance and hand strength in the PD group (p < 0.05).
Conclusion
Cervical proprioception and the strength and endurance of cervical muscles decrease in individuals with PD compared to healthy individuals. Impairment of cervical proprioception appears to be associated with poorer upper extremity performance. Detailed evaluation of the cervical region in PD may help determine the factors affecting upper extremity function.

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders Twitter